Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Culture, Politics, and National Identity in Mexican Literature and Film, 1929-1952.

By: Doremus, Anne T.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : Peter Lang Publishing Inc., 2012Description: 1 online resource (222 p.).ISBN: 9781453910092.Subject(s): Culture in motion pictures | Mexican literature -- 20th century -- History and criticism | Mexico -- In motion pictures | Motion pictures -- Mexico | National characteristics, Mexican, in literature | National characteristics, Mexican, in motion picturesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Culture, Politics, and National Identity in Mexican Literature and Film, 1929-1952DDC classification: 860.9/358 | 860.9358 LOC classification: PQ7155 .D67 2000Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Table of Contents; Acknowledgments ix; Note on Translations xi; Introduction 1; CHAPTER 1: Mexican Culture in the 1920s 18; CHAPTER 2: The Revolutionary and State Consolidation 30; CHAPTER 3: The Alienation of the Indian and the Integration Process 56; CHAPTER 4: Nationalism, the Pelado and the Myth of Authenticity 80; CHAPTER 5: The Psyche of the Provincial Mexican 104; CHAPTER 6: lndigenism, Mestizaje and National Identity 131; CHAPTER 7: The Construction of the Modern Mexican 156; Conclusion 182; Glossary 185; Works Cited 187; Index 200; BM 1 207
Summary: From 1929 to 1952 Mexico underwent a period of intense nationalism as the state, newly emerging from the Mexican Revolution, sought to legitimize itself, consolidate its institutions, and promote economic growth. As a consequence, these years also witnessed a fervent search for national self-awareness in the cultural sphere. This work contrasts constructions of national identity in some of the most renowned literary works of the period with those in some of the most popular films, revealing their distinct functions within the nationalist project. It demonstrates that in spite of their striking dissimilarities, articulations of a Mexican consciousness in these two mediums were complementary within the framework of nationalism, as they satisfied and shaped the interests and desires of distinct sectors of Mexican society.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PQ7155 .D67 2000 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1056637 Available EBL1056637

Table of Contents; Acknowledgments ix; Note on Translations xi; Introduction 1; CHAPTER 1: Mexican Culture in the 1920s 18; CHAPTER 2: The Revolutionary and State Consolidation 30; CHAPTER 3: The Alienation of the Indian and the Integration Process 56; CHAPTER 4: Nationalism, the Pelado and the Myth of Authenticity 80; CHAPTER 5: The Psyche of the Provincial Mexican 104; CHAPTER 6: lndigenism, Mestizaje and National Identity 131; CHAPTER 7: The Construction of the Modern Mexican 156; Conclusion 182; Glossary 185; Works Cited 187; Index 200; BM 1 207

From 1929 to 1952 Mexico underwent a period of intense nationalism as the state, newly emerging from the Mexican Revolution, sought to legitimize itself, consolidate its institutions, and promote economic growth. As a consequence, these years also witnessed a fervent search for national self-awareness in the cultural sphere. This work contrasts constructions of national identity in some of the most renowned literary works of the period with those in some of the most popular films, revealing their distinct functions within the nationalist project. It demonstrates that in spite of their striking dissimilarities, articulations of a Mexican consciousness in these two mediums were complementary within the framework of nationalism, as they satisfied and shaped the interests and desires of distinct sectors of Mexican society.

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

The Author: Anne T. Doremus received her Ph.D. in Spanish from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 1998. Her article, #65533;Authenticity, the Pelado and the Mexican National Identity: Essay versus Film during the 1930s and the 1940s,#65533; is scheduled to appear in Confluencia in the fall of 2000. She has ten years of college teaching experience, including two years as Assistant Professor of Spanish at Carroll College in Waukesha, Wisconsin. Currently she is an independent scholar in Seattle, Washington.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.