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The Birth of Rock & Roll : Music in the 1950s Through the 1960s

By: Publishing, Britannica Educational.
Contributor(s): Wallenfeldt, Jeff.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Popular Music Through the Decades: Publisher: Chicago : Britannica Educational Publishing, 2013Edition: 1.Description: 1 online resource (240 p.).ISBN: 9781615309115.Subject(s): Rock music -- United States -- 1961-1970 -- History and criticism -- Juvenile literature | Rock music -- United States -- To 1961 -- History and criticism -- Juvenile literature | Rock musicians -- United States -- Biography -- Juvenile literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Birth of Rock & Roll : Music in the 1950s Through the 1960sDDC classification: 781.6609 | 781.6609/045 | 781.6609045 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Half Title; Title; Copyright; Contents; Introduction; Chapter 1: What Is Rock?; The Difficulty of Definition; Crucial Rock Musicians; Musical Eclecticism and the Use of Technology; Rural Music in Urban Settings; Rock and Recording Technology; Marketing Rock and Roll; American Bandstand; A Black and White Hybrid; Chapter 2: Roots: Part 1, the Blues; Blues Basics; Classic Blues; W.C. Handy; Ma Rainey; Bessie Smith; Rural Blues; Blind Lemon Jefferson; Delta Blues; Charley Patton; Tommy Johnson; Skip James and Bukka White; Robert Johnson; Lonnie Johnson; Urban Blues
Sweet Home Chicago in the 1950sChapter 3: Roots: Part 2, Country and Western; "Grand Ole Opry"; Carter Family; The Louvin Brothers; Jimmie Rodgers; Singing Cowboys and Western Swing; Gene Autry; Bob Wills; Honky-Tonk; Ernest Tubb; Hank Williams; Bluegrass; Bill Monroe; The Birth of Music City; Ralph Stanley; Johnny Cash; Chapter 4: Roots: Part 3, Pre-rock Pop; Stephen Foster; Tin Pan Alley; The Development of the New Vocal Pop Star; Bing Crosby; Frank Sinatra; Nat King Cole; Pop Goes Eclectic; Chapter 5: Rhythum and Blues; Jump Blues; Louis Jordan; R&B on Record
J & M Studio: Making Musical Magic in New OrleansRhythm and Blues or Rock and Roll; Representative Works; Chapter 6: Rhythm and Blues People; Big Bands, Shouters, and Combos; Big Joe Turner; Johnny Otis; Charles Brown; Electric Bluesmen; Muddy Waters; Sonny Boy Williamson; John Lee Hooker; Howlin' Wolf; Little Walter; B.B. King; Jimmy Reed; Buddy Guy; Women; Dinah Washington; Big Mama Thornton; Ruth Brown; LaVern Baker; Etta James; Tina Turner; R&B; Ike Turner; Representative Works; Lloyd Price; The Drifters; Doc Pomus; Clyde McPhatter; Hank Ballard; The Coasters; Little Willie John
Huey "Piano" SmithRay Charles; Sam Cooke; Bobby "Blue" Bland; Jackie Wilson; Representative Works; Chapter 7: Doo-wop; The Mills Brothers; The Ink Spots; A Capella and Echo; The Orioles; The Platters; The Flamingos; The Moonglows; Representative Works; The Four Seasons; Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers; Race and Cover Versions; Chapter 8: Rock and Roll; Rockabillies to Rockers; Rockabilly; Representative Works; Frankie Avalon; Instrumentals; Duane Eddy; The Shadows; Lee Hazlewood; The Ventures; Leo Fender; Instrumental Developments; Surf Music; Surfing Culture; The Beach Boys
Chapter 9: Rock and RollersElvis Presley; Bill Haley and His Comets; Little Richard; Carl Perkins; Jerry Lee Lewis; Fats Domino; Chuck Berry; Bo Diddley; Buddy Holly; Buddy Holly's Record Collection; Gene Vincent; Eddie Cochran; The Everly Brothers; Sir Cliff Richard; Ritchie Valens; Roy Orbison; Wanda Jackson; Gene Pitney; Del Shannon; Chapter 10: Buildings and Walls of Sound; The Brill Building: Assembly-Line Pop; Leiber and Stoller; Bobby Darin; Phil Spector; Don Kirshner; Gold Star Studios; Girl Groups; Carole King; The Shirelles; The Crystals; The Ronettes; The Shangri-Las; Legacy
Chapter 11: Independent Record Labels and Producers
Summary: When rock and roll first burst onto the scene in the 1950s, it was more than a new form of music-it was a rebellion against the past. With the music of such artists as Elvis Presley, Buddy Holly, Little Richard, and the Supremes came a new attitude that allowed fans-many of them young-to look past the social norms of the time, a shift that included a greater interaction with and understanding between the races. This stunning, story-filled volume examines the phenomenon of rock and roll-the way it was before it crept into the mainstream it had once retaliated against-and the many musicians who made it into an art.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
ML3534.3 .B52 2013 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1069121 Available EBL1069121

Cover; Half Title; Title; Copyright; Contents; Introduction; Chapter 1: What Is Rock?; The Difficulty of Definition; Crucial Rock Musicians; Musical Eclecticism and the Use of Technology; Rural Music in Urban Settings; Rock and Recording Technology; Marketing Rock and Roll; American Bandstand; A Black and White Hybrid; Chapter 2: Roots: Part 1, the Blues; Blues Basics; Classic Blues; W.C. Handy; Ma Rainey; Bessie Smith; Rural Blues; Blind Lemon Jefferson; Delta Blues; Charley Patton; Tommy Johnson; Skip James and Bukka White; Robert Johnson; Lonnie Johnson; Urban Blues

Sweet Home Chicago in the 1950sChapter 3: Roots: Part 2, Country and Western; "Grand Ole Opry"; Carter Family; The Louvin Brothers; Jimmie Rodgers; Singing Cowboys and Western Swing; Gene Autry; Bob Wills; Honky-Tonk; Ernest Tubb; Hank Williams; Bluegrass; Bill Monroe; The Birth of Music City; Ralph Stanley; Johnny Cash; Chapter 4: Roots: Part 3, Pre-rock Pop; Stephen Foster; Tin Pan Alley; The Development of the New Vocal Pop Star; Bing Crosby; Frank Sinatra; Nat King Cole; Pop Goes Eclectic; Chapter 5: Rhythum and Blues; Jump Blues; Louis Jordan; R&B on Record

J & M Studio: Making Musical Magic in New OrleansRhythm and Blues or Rock and Roll; Representative Works; Chapter 6: Rhythm and Blues People; Big Bands, Shouters, and Combos; Big Joe Turner; Johnny Otis; Charles Brown; Electric Bluesmen; Muddy Waters; Sonny Boy Williamson; John Lee Hooker; Howlin' Wolf; Little Walter; B.B. King; Jimmy Reed; Buddy Guy; Women; Dinah Washington; Big Mama Thornton; Ruth Brown; LaVern Baker; Etta James; Tina Turner; R&B; Ike Turner; Representative Works; Lloyd Price; The Drifters; Doc Pomus; Clyde McPhatter; Hank Ballard; The Coasters; Little Willie John

Huey "Piano" SmithRay Charles; Sam Cooke; Bobby "Blue" Bland; Jackie Wilson; Representative Works; Chapter 7: Doo-wop; The Mills Brothers; The Ink Spots; A Capella and Echo; The Orioles; The Platters; The Flamingos; The Moonglows; Representative Works; The Four Seasons; Frankie Lymon and the Teenagers; Race and Cover Versions; Chapter 8: Rock and Roll; Rockabillies to Rockers; Rockabilly; Representative Works; Frankie Avalon; Instrumentals; Duane Eddy; The Shadows; Lee Hazlewood; The Ventures; Leo Fender; Instrumental Developments; Surf Music; Surfing Culture; The Beach Boys

Chapter 9: Rock and RollersElvis Presley; Bill Haley and His Comets; Little Richard; Carl Perkins; Jerry Lee Lewis; Fats Domino; Chuck Berry; Bo Diddley; Buddy Holly; Buddy Holly's Record Collection; Gene Vincent; Eddie Cochran; The Everly Brothers; Sir Cliff Richard; Ritchie Valens; Roy Orbison; Wanda Jackson; Gene Pitney; Del Shannon; Chapter 10: Buildings and Walls of Sound; The Brill Building: Assembly-Line Pop; Leiber and Stoller; Bobby Darin; Phil Spector; Don Kirshner; Gold Star Studios; Girl Groups; Carole King; The Shirelles; The Crystals; The Ronettes; The Shangri-Las; Legacy

Chapter 11: Independent Record Labels and Producers

When rock and roll first burst onto the scene in the 1950s, it was more than a new form of music-it was a rebellion against the past. With the music of such artists as Elvis Presley, Buddy Holly, Little Richard, and the Supremes came a new attitude that allowed fans-many of them young-to look past the social norms of the time, a shift that included a greater interaction with and understanding between the races. This stunning, story-filled volume examines the phenomenon of rock and roll-the way it was before it crept into the mainstream it had once retaliated against-and the many musicians who made it into an art.

Description based upon print version of record.

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