Reading Colonial Japan : Text, Context, and Critique

By: Mason, MicheleContributor(s): Lee, HelenMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: Palo Alto : Stanford University Press, 2012Description: 1 online resource (322 p.)ISBN: 9780804781596Subject(s): Colonies in literature | Imperialism in literature | Japan -- Colonies -- History | Japanese literature -- 20th century -- History and criticism | Japanese literature -- Translations into EnglishGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Reading Colonial Japan : Text, Context, and CritiqueDDC classification: 325.352 | 325/.352 LOC classification: JV5227JV5227 .R43 2012JV5227.R43 2012Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Contributors; Acknowledgments; Note on Japanese Names; Introduction - Michele M. Mason and Helen J. S. Lee ; Chapter One ; Text: The Shores of the Sorachi River - Kunikida Doppo, Translation by Michele M. Mason ; Context/Critique: Writing Ainu Out/Writing Japanese In: The "Nature" of Japanese Colonialism in Hokkaido - Michele M. Mason; Chapter Two; Text: Hokkaido Former Natives Protection Law, Translation by Richard Siddle ; Context/Critique Rule in the Name of "Protection": The Vocabulary of Colonialism - Komori Yoichi, Translation by Michele M. Mason; Chapter Three
Text: Officer Ukuma - Ikemiyagi Sekiho, Translation by Davinder L. Bhowmik Context/Critique: Subaltern Identity in Okinawa - Davinder L. Bhowmik; Chapter Four; Text: Demon Bird - Sato Haruo, Translation by Robert Tierney ; Context/Critique: Violence, Borders, Identity: An Ethnographic Narrative Set in Colonial Taiwan - Robert Tierney; Chapter Five; Text: The Manual of Home Cuisine - The Women's Division of the Green Flag Association, Translation by Helen J. S. Lee; Context/Critique: Eating for the Emperor: The Nationalization of Settler Homes and Bodies in the Kominka Era - Helen J. S. Lee
Chapter SixText: Wolf Forest, Basket Forest, and Thief Forest - Miyazawa Kenji, Translation by Kota Inoue ; Context/Critique: A Little Story of Settler Colonialism: Imperialist Consciousness and Children's Literature in the 1920s - Kota Inoue; Chapter Seven; Text: Manchu Girl - Koizumi Kikue, Translation by Kimberly T. Kono ; Context/Critique: Imperializing Motherhood: The Education of a "Manchu Girl" in Colonial Manchuria - Kimberly T. Kono; Chapter Eight; Text: The Adventures of Dankichi - Shimada Keizo, Translation by Helen J. S. Lee
Context/Critique: Popular Orientalism and Japanese Views of Asia - Kawamura Minato, Translation by Kota Inoue and Helen J. S. LeeIndex
Summary: By any measure, Japan''s modern empire was formidable. The only major non-western colonial power in the 20th century, Japan controlled a vast area of Asia and numerous archipelagos in the Pacific Ocean. The massive extraction of resources and extensive cultural assimilation policies radically impacted the lives of millions of Asians and Micronesians, and the political, economic, and cultural ramifications of this era are still felt today.The Japanese empire lasted from 1869-1945. During this time, how was the Japanese imperial project understood, imagined, and lived? Reading Colonial Japan is a unique anthology that aims to deepen knowledge of Japanese colonialism(s) by providing an eclectic selection of translated Japanese primary sources and analytical essays that illuminate Japan''s many and varied colonial projects. The primary documents highlight how central cultural production and dissemination were to the colonial effort, while accentuating the myriad ways colonialism permeated every facet of life. The variety of genres the explored includes legal documents, children''s literature, cookbooks, serialized comics, and literary texts by well-known authors of the time. These cultural works, produced by a broad spectrum of "ordinary" Japanese citizens (a housewife in Manchuria, settlers in Korea, manga artists and fiction writers in mainland Japan, and so on), functioned effectively to reinforce the official policies that controlled and violated the lives of the colonized throughout Japan''s empire. By making available and analyzing a wide-range of sources that represent "media" during the Japanese colonial period, Reading Colonial Japan draws attention to the powerful role that language and imagination played in producing the material realities of Japanese colonialism.
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Contents; Contributors; Acknowledgments; Note on Japanese Names; Introduction - Michele M. Mason and Helen J. S. Lee ; Chapter One ; Text: The Shores of the Sorachi River - Kunikida Doppo, Translation by Michele M. Mason ; Context/Critique: Writing Ainu Out/Writing Japanese In: The "Nature" of Japanese Colonialism in Hokkaido - Michele M. Mason; Chapter Two; Text: Hokkaido Former Natives Protection Law, Translation by Richard Siddle ; Context/Critique Rule in the Name of "Protection": The Vocabulary of Colonialism - Komori Yoichi, Translation by Michele M. Mason; Chapter Three

Text: Officer Ukuma - Ikemiyagi Sekiho, Translation by Davinder L. Bhowmik Context/Critique: Subaltern Identity in Okinawa - Davinder L. Bhowmik; Chapter Four; Text: Demon Bird - Sato Haruo, Translation by Robert Tierney ; Context/Critique: Violence, Borders, Identity: An Ethnographic Narrative Set in Colonial Taiwan - Robert Tierney; Chapter Five; Text: The Manual of Home Cuisine - The Women's Division of the Green Flag Association, Translation by Helen J. S. Lee; Context/Critique: Eating for the Emperor: The Nationalization of Settler Homes and Bodies in the Kominka Era - Helen J. S. Lee

Chapter SixText: Wolf Forest, Basket Forest, and Thief Forest - Miyazawa Kenji, Translation by Kota Inoue ; Context/Critique: A Little Story of Settler Colonialism: Imperialist Consciousness and Children's Literature in the 1920s - Kota Inoue; Chapter Seven; Text: Manchu Girl - Koizumi Kikue, Translation by Kimberly T. Kono ; Context/Critique: Imperializing Motherhood: The Education of a "Manchu Girl" in Colonial Manchuria - Kimberly T. Kono; Chapter Eight; Text: The Adventures of Dankichi - Shimada Keizo, Translation by Helen J. S. Lee

Context/Critique: Popular Orientalism and Japanese Views of Asia - Kawamura Minato, Translation by Kota Inoue and Helen J. S. LeeIndex

By any measure, Japan''s modern empire was formidable. The only major non-western colonial power in the 20th century, Japan controlled a vast area of Asia and numerous archipelagos in the Pacific Ocean. The massive extraction of resources and extensive cultural assimilation policies radically impacted the lives of millions of Asians and Micronesians, and the political, economic, and cultural ramifications of this era are still felt today.The Japanese empire lasted from 1869-1945. During this time, how was the Japanese imperial project understood, imagined, and lived? Reading Colonial Japan is a unique anthology that aims to deepen knowledge of Japanese colonialism(s) by providing an eclectic selection of translated Japanese primary sources and analytical essays that illuminate Japan''s many and varied colonial projects. The primary documents highlight how central cultural production and dissemination were to the colonial effort, while accentuating the myriad ways colonialism permeated every facet of life. The variety of genres the explored includes legal documents, children''s literature, cookbooks, serialized comics, and literary texts by well-known authors of the time. These cultural works, produced by a broad spectrum of "ordinary" Japanese citizens (a housewife in Manchuria, settlers in Korea, manga artists and fiction writers in mainland Japan, and so on), functioned effectively to reinforce the official policies that controlled and violated the lives of the colonized throughout Japan''s empire. By making available and analyzing a wide-range of sources that represent "media" during the Japanese colonial period, Reading Colonial Japan draws attention to the powerful role that language and imagination played in producing the material realities of Japanese colonialism.

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Michele M. Mason is assistant professor of Japanese literature at the University of Maryland, College Park. She is also the co-producer and interpreter for the short documentary film Witness to Hiroshima (2010). Helen J.S. Lee is an assistant professor of Japanese studies at the Underwood International College, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea.

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