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Postcolonial Imaginations and Moral Representations in African Literature and Culture.

By: Eze, Chielozona.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Lanham : Lexington Books, 2011Description: 1 online resource (157 p.).ISBN: 9780739145081.Subject(s): Africa - Intellectual life - 20th century | Africa -- Intellectual life -- 20th century | Africa - Intellectual life - 21st century | Africa -- Intellectual life -- 21st century | African literature - 20th century - History and criticism | African literature -- 20th century -- History and criticism | African literature - 21st century - History and criticism | African literature -- 21st century -- History and criticism | Ethics in literature | Ethics in literature | Postcolonialism - Africa | Postcolonialism -- Africa | Postcolonialism in literature | Postcolonialism in literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Postcolonial Imaginations and Moral Representations in African Literature and CultureDDC classification: 809.896 LOC classification: PL8010 .Ez899 2011Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Postcolonial Imagination and Moral Representations-Africa in Discourse and Culture; Chapter One: Postcolonial States of Injury and Moral Imaginations; Chapter Two: The Moral Reinvention of Africa; Chapter Three: Things Fall Apart and the Invention of African Culture; Chapter Four: The Pitfalls of African Feminism; Chapter Five: Robert Mugabe and the Symbolic Power of History; Chapter Six: Frantz Fanon and the Search for New Discourse Paradigms; Chapter Seven: Wole Soyinka and the Moral Foundations of Community
Chapter Eight: Literature and the Task of Increasing the Sum Total of HumanityBibliography; Index; About the Author
Summary: Following in the footsteps of Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart, the tenor of the postcolonial African culture has been justifiably anti-imperialist. In the 21st century, however, there has been a gradual but certain shift away from the "write-back" discourse paradigm, towards more integrative, globally inflected cultural interpretive models in Africa. This book celebrates the emergence of new interpretive paradigms such as in African philosophy, gender studies and literature.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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PL8010 .Ez899 2011 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=860136 Available EBL860136

Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Postcolonial Imagination and Moral Representations-Africa in Discourse and Culture; Chapter One: Postcolonial States of Injury and Moral Imaginations; Chapter Two: The Moral Reinvention of Africa; Chapter Three: Things Fall Apart and the Invention of African Culture; Chapter Four: The Pitfalls of African Feminism; Chapter Five: Robert Mugabe and the Symbolic Power of History; Chapter Six: Frantz Fanon and the Search for New Discourse Paradigms; Chapter Seven: Wole Soyinka and the Moral Foundations of Community

Chapter Eight: Literature and the Task of Increasing the Sum Total of HumanityBibliography; Index; About the Author

Following in the footsteps of Chinua Achebe's Things Fall Apart, the tenor of the postcolonial African culture has been justifiably anti-imperialist. In the 21st century, however, there has been a gradual but certain shift away from the "write-back" discourse paradigm, towards more integrative, globally inflected cultural interpretive models in Africa. This book celebrates the emergence of new interpretive paradigms such as in African philosophy, gender studies and literature.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Eze (Northeastern Illinois Univ.) is aware of the many cultures of Africa, despite the title of his book, and he notes that the reader should acknowledge that Africa is not one monolithic culture. Eze takes issue with the delusion of Africa's racial innocence, a notion that has permeated world culture and literature and is largely due to Africa's violent encounters with Western powers. He asserts that there is a guilt-driven discourse in Africa and about Africa and seeks to challenge that. The text is divided into eight chapters. In chapter 1, Eze discusses the works of significant African writers and critics--Chinua Achebe, Moses Ebe Ochonu. In subsequent chapters he considers, among other things, the ideas of Edward Wilmot Blyden as a pioneer of pan-Negro thinkers in the West (and challenges many of Blyden's ideas, theories, and conclusions); the importance and monumental influence of Achebe's Things Fall Apart; and the role of the new African writers in regenerating the African mind. Readers with no knowledge of African literature, history, authors, and critics will find the book difficult to follow and understand. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. B. Taylor-Thompson Houston Community College

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