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Fruits of Victory : The Woman's Land Army of America in the Great War

By: Weiss, Elaine F.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Dulles, : Potomac Books Inc., 2008Description: 1 online resource (352 p.).ISBN: 9781612343990.Subject(s): Women farmers -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Women’s Land Army of America -- History | World War, 1914-1918 -- Economic aspects -- United States | World War, 1914-1918 -- Food supply -- United States | World War, 1914-1918 -- Participation, Female | World War, 1914-1918 -- War work -- United States | World War, 1914-1918 -- Women -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Fruits of Victory : The Woman''s Land Army of America in the Great WarDDC classification: 940.3/73082 | 940.373082 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Prelude: Liberty Day; Part One: The Girl With a Hoe Behind the Man With a Gun; 1. The Right to Serve: A British Land Army; 2. Female Preparedness; 3. An Agricultural Army; 4. Suffrage Agriculture; 5. Soil Sisters; 6. A Feminine Invasion of the Land: The Bedford Camp; 7. Farmerettes and Hoover Helpers: Fall 1917; 8. Women on the Land; 9. A Hysterical Appeal; 10. A Fine Propaganda: The Fair Farmerette and Her Publicity Machine; 11. Enlist Now!; Part Two: The Patriot Farmerette; 12. In Bifurcated Garb of Toil: California; 13. Hortense Powdermaker in Maryland
14. Cultivating the Soothing Weed: Connecticut15. Libertyville: Illinois; 16. Girls Who Thought Potatoes Grew on Trees: New England; 17. The Farmerette in Wanamaker's Window: Selling the Land Army in New Jersey; 18. Georgia Cotton; 19. Harsh Terrain; 20. Miss Diehl and the Wellesley Experiment Station; 21. Tiller, Planter, Gleaner: New York; 22. Marriage of Convenience; 23. A Hungry World; 24. Carry On; 25. Farmerette Redux: 1919 and Beyond; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z; About the Author
Summary: The women who kept the farms going while the soldiers were Over There
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Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Prelude: Liberty Day; Part One: The Girl With a Hoe Behind the Man With a Gun; 1. The Right to Serve: A British Land Army; 2. Female Preparedness; 3. An Agricultural Army; 4. Suffrage Agriculture; 5. Soil Sisters; 6. A Feminine Invasion of the Land: The Bedford Camp; 7. Farmerettes and Hoover Helpers: Fall 1917; 8. Women on the Land; 9. A Hysterical Appeal; 10. A Fine Propaganda: The Fair Farmerette and Her Publicity Machine; 11. Enlist Now!; Part Two: The Patriot Farmerette; 12. In Bifurcated Garb of Toil: California; 13. Hortense Powdermaker in Maryland

14. Cultivating the Soothing Weed: Connecticut15. Libertyville: Illinois; 16. Girls Who Thought Potatoes Grew on Trees: New England; 17. The Farmerette in Wanamaker's Window: Selling the Land Army in New Jersey; 18. Georgia Cotton; 19. Harsh Terrain; 20. Miss Diehl and the Wellesley Experiment Station; 21. Tiller, Planter, Gleaner: New York; 22. Marriage of Convenience; 23. A Hungry World; 24. Carry On; 25. Farmerette Redux: 1919 and Beyond; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z; About the Author

The women who kept the farms going while the soldiers were Over There

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Library Journal Review

Weiss, who has written for such publications as the New York Times and Harper's, chronicles the largely forgotten history of the Woman's Land Army (WLA), a group of women in the United States who left their homes and college dorms in droves to volunteer when American involvement in World War I called young men from the fields to the trenches of Europe. Weiss shows how these "farmerettes" faced an uphill battle, as they were often met with disdain by shorthanded farmers and Washington politicians who did not feel the situation was dire enough to warrant hiring women to do men's work. WLA architects, many of whom earned their stripes in the suffrage movement, developed a blueprint for managing a group anywhere in the United States, and they were able to secure wages-and an eight-hour workday-equal to their male counterparts. The group was disbanded after the war, but the farmerettes helped pave the way for women working during World War II. Weiss effectively chronicles the birth of the WLA movement and the dedicated women behind it. Recommended for both scholarly readers and interested history buffs.-Patti C. McCall, Albany Molecular Research, Inc., NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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