Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Our Bodies, Our Crimes : The Policing of Women's Reproduction in America

By: Flavin, Jeanne.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : NYU Press, 2008Edition: 1.Description: 1 online resource (316 p.).ISBN: 9780814728550.Subject(s): Children of women prisoners -- United States | Reproductive rights -- United States | Women -- United States -- Social conditions | Women prisoners -- Family relationships -- United States | Women prisoners -- Health and hygiene -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Our Bodies, Our Crimes : The Policing of Women’s Reproduction in AmericaDDC classification: 323.3/40973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Introduction; Part I: Beginning; 1 "Race Criminals": Reproductive Rights in America; Part II: Begetting; 2 "Breeders": The Right to Procreate; 3 "Back-Alley Butchers": Terminating Pregnancies; 4 "Baby-Killers": Neonaticide and Infant Abandonment; Part III: Bearing; 5 "Innocent Preborn Victims": Fetal Protectionism and Pregnant Women; 6 "Liars and Whiners": Incarcerated Women's Right to Reproductive Health; Part IV: Mothering; 7 "Bad Mothers": Incarcerated Women's Ties to Their Children; 8 "Asking for It": Battered Women and Child Custody; Conclusion: Being; Notes; Bibliography
AcknowledgmentsIndex; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; P; R; S; T; V; W; About the Author
Summary: Winner of the 2010 Distinguished Book Award from the American Sociological Association; Sex and Gender Section. The Real Issue behind the Abortion Debate. An op-ed by Jeanne Flavin in the San Francisco Chronicle. 2009 Choice Outstanding Academic Title. The intense policing of women's reproductive capacity places women's health and human rights in great peril. Poor women are pressured to undergo sterilization. Women addicted to illicit drugs risk arrest for carrying their pregnancies to term. Courts, child welfare, and law enforcement agencies fail to recognize the efforts of battered and incarcerated women to care for their children. Pregnant inmates are subject to inhumane practices such as shackling during labor and poor prenatal care. And decades after Roe , the criminalization of certain procedures and regulation of abortion providers still obstruct women's access to safe and private abortions. In this important work, Jeanne Flavin looks beyond abortion to document how the law and the criminal justice system police women's rights to conceive, to be pregnant, and to raise their children. Through vivid and disturbing case studies, Flavin shows how the state seeks to establish what a "good woman" and "fit mother" should look like and whose reproduction is valued. With a stirring conclusion that calls for broad-based measures that strengthen women's economic position , choice-making, autonomy, sexual freedom, and health care, Our Bodies, Our Crimes is a battle cry for all women in their fight to be fully recognized as human beings. At its heart, this book is about the right of a woman to be a healthy and valued member of society independent of how or whether she reproduces.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HQ1236.5.U6 F532 2009 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=865451 Available EBL865451

Contents; Introduction; Part I: Beginning; 1 "Race Criminals": Reproductive Rights in America; Part II: Begetting; 2 "Breeders": The Right to Procreate; 3 "Back-Alley Butchers": Terminating Pregnancies; 4 "Baby-Killers": Neonaticide and Infant Abandonment; Part III: Bearing; 5 "Innocent Preborn Victims": Fetal Protectionism and Pregnant Women; 6 "Liars and Whiners": Incarcerated Women's Right to Reproductive Health; Part IV: Mothering; 7 "Bad Mothers": Incarcerated Women's Ties to Their Children; 8 "Asking for It": Battered Women and Child Custody; Conclusion: Being; Notes; Bibliography

AcknowledgmentsIndex; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; P; R; S; T; V; W; About the Author

Winner of the 2010 Distinguished Book Award from the American Sociological Association; Sex and Gender Section. The Real Issue behind the Abortion Debate. An op-ed by Jeanne Flavin in the San Francisco Chronicle. 2009 Choice Outstanding Academic Title. The intense policing of women's reproductive capacity places women's health and human rights in great peril. Poor women are pressured to undergo sterilization. Women addicted to illicit drugs risk arrest for carrying their pregnancies to term. Courts, child welfare, and law enforcement agencies fail to recognize the efforts of battered and incarcerated women to care for their children. Pregnant inmates are subject to inhumane practices such as shackling during labor and poor prenatal care. And decades after Roe , the criminalization of certain procedures and regulation of abortion providers still obstruct women's access to safe and private abortions. In this important work, Jeanne Flavin looks beyond abortion to document how the law and the criminal justice system police women's rights to conceive, to be pregnant, and to raise their children. Through vivid and disturbing case studies, Flavin shows how the state seeks to establish what a "good woman" and "fit mother" should look like and whose reproduction is valued. With a stirring conclusion that calls for broad-based measures that strengthen women's economic position , choice-making, autonomy, sexual freedom, and health care, Our Bodies, Our Crimes is a battle cry for all women in their fight to be fully recognized as human beings. At its heart, this book is about the right of a woman to be a healthy and valued member of society independent of how or whether she reproduces.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This book contributes to the literature on reproduction in three important ways: first, by broadly interpreting "reproduction" to include not only the right to beget and bear a child (or not), but also reproductive health, protection from violence, and the parenting of one's children; second, by including within the category of "women" the experiences of women of color, minors, the poor, and the incarcerated; and third, by demonstrating how the regulation of women's reproduction threatens their very citizenship. Flavin's approach is unique for how it draws on concepts from criminal justice to critiquing society's propensity for punishment and control of women rather than commitment to supporting them through social programs. Her astute analysis sees beyond the rhetoric to critique popular symbolic laws such as safe haven statutes, AMBER alerts, and fetal homicide laws. The writing is clear, the arguments well documented, and the result disturbing. Flavin (Fordham Univ.) concludes with a hopeful chapter that offers guidance in how to use the power of law to support women as citizens rather than to police them as criminals. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. S. Behuniak Le Moyne College

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.