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New and Improved : The Transformation of American Women''s Emotional Culture

By: Spurlock, John C.
Contributor(s): Magistro, Cynthia.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: eBooks on Demand.History of Emotions S: Publisher: New York : NYU Press, 1998Edition: 1.Description: 1 online resource (230 p.).ISBN: 9780814739815.Subject(s): Emotions -- Social aspects -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Emotions in literature | United States -- Social life and customs -- 20th century -- Psychological aspects | Women -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Women -- United States -- Psychology -- History -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: New and Improved : The Transformation of American Women''s Emotional CultureDDC classification: 305.4/0973/0904 | 305.409730904 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title Page; Copyright Page; Contents; Preface; 1 Self and Emotion in the Early Twentieth Century; 2 Flaming Youth; 3 The Single Woman; 4 The Flapper Wife; 5 The Silver Cord; 6 The Fountain; Notes; Index; About the Authors
Summary: As the Victorian era drew to a close, American culture experienced a vast transformation. In many ways, the culture changed even more rapidly and profoundly for women. The "new woman," the "new freedom," and the "sexual revolution" all referred to women moving out of the Victorian home and into the public realm that men had long claimed as their own. Modern middle-class women made a distinction between emotional styles that they considered Victorian and those they considered modern. They expected fulfillment in marriage, companionship, and career, and actively sought up-to-date versions of love and happiness, relieved that they lived in an age free from taboo and prudery. Drawing on the diaries, letters, and memoirs of women from a wide range of backgrounds and geographic regions, this volume offers insights into middle-class women''s experiences of American culture in this age of transition. It documents the ways in which that culture--including new technologies, advertising, and movies--shaped women''s emotional lives and how these women appropriated the new messages and ideals. In addition, the authors describe the difficulties that women encountered when emotional experiences failed to match cultural expectations.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HQ1420 .S68 1998 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=865554 Available EBL865554

Cover; Title Page; Copyright Page; Contents; Preface; 1 Self and Emotion in the Early Twentieth Century; 2 Flaming Youth; 3 The Single Woman; 4 The Flapper Wife; 5 The Silver Cord; 6 The Fountain; Notes; Index; About the Authors

As the Victorian era drew to a close, American culture experienced a vast transformation. In many ways, the culture changed even more rapidly and profoundly for women. The "new woman," the "new freedom," and the "sexual revolution" all referred to women moving out of the Victorian home and into the public realm that men had long claimed as their own. Modern middle-class women made a distinction between emotional styles that they considered Victorian and those they considered modern. They expected fulfillment in marriage, companionship, and career, and actively sought up-to-date versions of love and happiness, relieved that they lived in an age free from taboo and prudery. Drawing on the diaries, letters, and memoirs of women from a wide range of backgrounds and geographic regions, this volume offers insights into middle-class women''s experiences of American culture in this age of transition. It documents the ways in which that culture--including new technologies, advertising, and movies--shaped women''s emotional lives and how these women appropriated the new messages and ideals. In addition, the authors describe the difficulties that women encountered when emotional experiences failed to match cultural expectations.

Description based upon print version of record.

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