American Muslim Women : Negotiating Race, Class, and Gender within the Ummah

By: Karim, JamillahMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandReligion, Race, & Ethnicity: Publisher: New York : NYU Press, 2008Edition: 1Description: 1 online resource (304 p.)ISBN: 9780814749111Subject(s): African American women -- Religious life | Atlanta (Ga.) -- Race relations | Chicago (Ill.) -- Race relations | Muslim women -- United States -- Social conditions | Muslims -- United States -- Social conditions -- Case studies | Sex role -- United States -- Case studies | Social classes -- United States -- Case studies | South Asian American women -- Religious life | United States -- Race relations -- Case studies | Women immigrants -- United States -- Social conditionsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: American Muslim Women : Negotiating Race, Class, and Gender within the UmmahDDC classification: 305.6/97 LOC classification: E184.M88 K37 2009Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
CONTENTS; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 African American and Immigrant Relations: Between Inequality and Global Flows ; 2 Race, Class, and Residence in the Chicago Ummah: Ethnic Muslim Spaces and American Muslim Discourses; 3 Across Ethnic Boundaries: Women's Movement and Resistance in the Chicago Ummah; 4 Negotiating an American Muslim Identity after September 11: Second-Generation Muslim Women in Chicago; 5 Negotiating Gender Lines: Women's Movement across Atlanta Mosques
6 Negotiating Sisterhood, Gender, and Generation: Friendship between Second-Generation South Asian American and African American Muslim WomenConclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Glossary; Index; About the Author
Summary: African American Muslims and South Asian Muslim immigrants are two of the largest ethnic Muslim groups in the U.S. Yet there are few sites in which African Americans and South Asian immigrants come together, and South Asians are often held up as a "model minority" against African Americans. However, the American ummah, or American Muslim community, stands as a unique site for interethnic solidarity in a time of increased tensions between native-born Americans and immigrants. This ethnographic study of African American and South Asian immigrant Muslims in Chicago and Atlanta explores how Islamic ideals of racial harmony and equality create hopeful possibilities in an American society that remains challenged by race and class inequalities. The volume focuses on women who, due to gender inequalities, are sometimes more likely to move outside of their ethnic Muslim spaces and interact with other Muslim ethnic groups in search of gender justice. American Muslim Women explores the relationships and sometimes alliances between African Americans and South Asian immigrants, drawing on interviews with a diverse group of women from these two communities. Karim investigates what it means to negotiate religious sisterhood against America''s race and class hierarchies, and how those in the American Muslim community both construct and cross ethnic boundaries. American Muslim Women reveals the ways in which multiple forms of identity frame the American Muslim experience, in some moments reinforcing ethnic boundaries, and at other times, resisting them.
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CONTENTS; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 African American and Immigrant Relations: Between Inequality and Global Flows ; 2 Race, Class, and Residence in the Chicago Ummah: Ethnic Muslim Spaces and American Muslim Discourses; 3 Across Ethnic Boundaries: Women's Movement and Resistance in the Chicago Ummah; 4 Negotiating an American Muslim Identity after September 11: Second-Generation Muslim Women in Chicago; 5 Negotiating Gender Lines: Women's Movement across Atlanta Mosques

6 Negotiating Sisterhood, Gender, and Generation: Friendship between Second-Generation South Asian American and African American Muslim WomenConclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Glossary; Index; About the Author

African American Muslims and South Asian Muslim immigrants are two of the largest ethnic Muslim groups in the U.S. Yet there are few sites in which African Americans and South Asian immigrants come together, and South Asians are often held up as a "model minority" against African Americans. However, the American ummah, or American Muslim community, stands as a unique site for interethnic solidarity in a time of increased tensions between native-born Americans and immigrants. This ethnographic study of African American and South Asian immigrant Muslims in Chicago and Atlanta explores how Islamic ideals of racial harmony and equality create hopeful possibilities in an American society that remains challenged by race and class inequalities. The volume focuses on women who, due to gender inequalities, are sometimes more likely to move outside of their ethnic Muslim spaces and interact with other Muslim ethnic groups in search of gender justice. American Muslim Women explores the relationships and sometimes alliances between African Americans and South Asian immigrants, drawing on interviews with a diverse group of women from these two communities. Karim investigates what it means to negotiate religious sisterhood against America''s race and class hierarchies, and how those in the American Muslim community both construct and cross ethnic boundaries. American Muslim Women reveals the ways in which multiple forms of identity frame the American Muslim experience, in some moments reinforcing ethnic boundaries, and at other times, resisting them.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Karim (religious studies, Spelman College), a second generation African American Muslim scholar, explores the complex relationship between African American Muslims and South Asian Muslim immigrants in the context of the larger US Muslim community, which is estimated to number three to six million people. Karim's focus is on women members of the African American and South Asian immigrant Muslim communities of Chicago and Atlanta and the way they experience and interpret their interactions as they come together in private homes, Arabic classes, and mosques. The author's interest is on how "religious identity influences race relations and how race affects religious identity" (p.6) and on what a shared religious identity as Muslims means in a racially divided society. In other words, does the notion of a universal Muslim community, the ummah, with its ideals of sisterhood and brotherhood and social justice, transcend racial and cultural differences? Drawing on her own life and the lives of the many women she interviewed, Karim reveals the subtle and uneasy ways in which racial, ethnic, class, and gender divisions in the US interact to challenge the idealized notion of a united Muslim community. Summing Up: Recommended. All levels/libraries. A. Rassam emerita, CUNY Queens College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

KarimJamillah:

Jamillah Karim is an international lecturer in race, gender, and Islam in America. She was formerly Associate Professor of Religious Studies at Spelman College. She is the author of American Muslim Women: Negotiating Race, Class, and Gender within the Ummah.

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