Pimps Up, Ho''s Down : Hip Hop''s Hold on Young Black Women

By: Sharpley-Whiting, T. Denean DeneanMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandPublisher: New York : NYU Press, 2007Edition: 1Description: 1 online resource (205 p.)ISBN: 9780814786505Subject(s): African American women -- Interviews | African American women -- Psychology | African American women -- Social conditions | Hip-hop -- Social aspects | Sex role -- Political aspects -- United States | Sexism -- United States | United States -- Social conditions -- 1980- | Young women -- United States -- Interviews | Young women -- United States -- Psychology | Young women -- United States -- Social conditionsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Pimps Up, Ho''s Down : Hip Hop''s Hold on Young Black WomenDDC classification: 305.48/896073 | 305.48896073 LOC classification: E185.86 .S515 2007Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Prologue: Sex, Power, and Punanny; Introduction: Pimpin Ain''t Easy, But Somebody''s Got to Do It; " I See the Same Ho": Video Vixens, Beauty Culture, and Diasporic Sex Tourism; Too Hot To Be Bothered: Black Women and Sexual Abuse; " I'm a Hustla, Baby": Groupie Love and the Hip Hop Star; Strip Tails: Booty Clappin'', P-poppin'', Shake Dancing; Coda: or a Few Last Words on Hip Hop and Feminism; Notes; Index
Summary: 2007 Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association Emily Toth Award. Pimps Up, Ho's Down pulls at the threads of the intricately knotted issues surrounding young black women and hip hop culture. What unravels for Tracy D. Sharpley-Whiting is a new, and problematic, politics of gender. In this fascinating and forceful book, Sharpley-Whiting, a feminist writer who is a member of the hip hop generation, interrogates the complexities of young black women''s engagement with a culture that is masculinist, misogynistic, and frequently mystifying. Beyond their portrayal in rap lyrics, the display of black women in music videos, television, film, fashion, and on the Internet is indispensable to the mass media engineered appeal of hip hop culture, the author argues. And the commercial trafficking in the images and behaviors associated with hip hop has made them appear normal, acceptable, and entertaining - both in the U.S. and around the world. Sharpley-Whiting questions the impacts of hip hop''s increasing alliance with the sex industry, the rise of groupie culture in the hip hop world, the impact of hip hop''s compulsory heterosexual culture on young black women, and the permeation of the hip hop ethos into young black women''s conceptions of love and romance. The author knows her subject from the inside. Coming of age in the midst of hip hop''s evolution in the late 1980s, she mixed her graduate studies with work as a runway and print model in the 1990s. Her book features interviews with exotic dancers, black hip hop groupies, and hip hop generation members Jacklyn "Diva" Bush, rapper Trina, and filmmaker Aishah Simmons, along with the voices of many "everyday" young women. Pimps Up, Ho's Down turns down the volume and amplifies the substance of discussions about hip hop culture and to provide a space for young black women to be heard.
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Contents; Acknowledgments; Prologue: Sex, Power, and Punanny; Introduction: Pimpin Ain''t Easy, But Somebody''s Got to Do It; " I See the Same Ho": Video Vixens, Beauty Culture, and Diasporic Sex Tourism; Too Hot To Be Bothered: Black Women and Sexual Abuse; " I'm a Hustla, Baby": Groupie Love and the Hip Hop Star; Strip Tails: Booty Clappin'', P-poppin'', Shake Dancing; Coda: or a Few Last Words on Hip Hop and Feminism; Notes; Index

2007 Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association Emily Toth Award. Pimps Up, Ho's Down pulls at the threads of the intricately knotted issues surrounding young black women and hip hop culture. What unravels for Tracy D. Sharpley-Whiting is a new, and problematic, politics of gender. In this fascinating and forceful book, Sharpley-Whiting, a feminist writer who is a member of the hip hop generation, interrogates the complexities of young black women''s engagement with a culture that is masculinist, misogynistic, and frequently mystifying. Beyond their portrayal in rap lyrics, the display of black women in music videos, television, film, fashion, and on the Internet is indispensable to the mass media engineered appeal of hip hop culture, the author argues. And the commercial trafficking in the images and behaviors associated with hip hop has made them appear normal, acceptable, and entertaining - both in the U.S. and around the world. Sharpley-Whiting questions the impacts of hip hop''s increasing alliance with the sex industry, the rise of groupie culture in the hip hop world, the impact of hip hop''s compulsory heterosexual culture on young black women, and the permeation of the hip hop ethos into young black women''s conceptions of love and romance. The author knows her subject from the inside. Coming of age in the midst of hip hop''s evolution in the late 1980s, she mixed her graduate studies with work as a runway and print model in the 1990s. Her book features interviews with exotic dancers, black hip hop groupies, and hip hop generation members Jacklyn "Diva" Bush, rapper Trina, and filmmaker Aishah Simmons, along with the voices of many "everyday" young women. Pimps Up, Ho's Down turns down the volume and amplifies the substance of discussions about hip hop culture and to provide a space for young black women to be heard.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

This work by Sharpley-Whiting (African American & diaspora studies, French, Vanderbilt Univ.; Negritude Women) isn't a discussion of hip-hop and women but a look at women of the hip-hop generation (black people born between about 1965 and 1984). Topics range from strip clubs, groupie culture, and sex as a commodity to the ongoing idealization of white beauty and a cultural preference for, in the author's words, Ascriptive Mulattas (women of mixed race or lighter-skinned black or Latina women). Although clear and well written, the book suffers from superficial treatments of hip-hop, engaging only briefly with, e.g., controversial women rappers and women's role in the success of hip-hop music, especially on the dance floor. It serves as a decent jumping-off point to discussions of young black women in our current society, but a longer, more nuanced, and in-depth look at particulars would have been more useful. Nevertheless, Sharpley-Whiting has opened up the dialog, offering a source for research in a burgeoning area of study. Recommended for academic libraries catering to popular music or feminist studies programs.--Anna Katterjohn, Library Journal (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

This book's title suggests it is another addition to the growing literature on hip-hop. But this is not really a musical or historical examination; rather, it is a series of five essays tangential to hip-hip but specifically addressing feminist issues and focusing on sex and gender. Overlooking persons who, for aesthetic or sociological reasons, object to the idiom, Sharpley-Whiting (African American and diaspora studies and French, Vanderbilt Univ.) offers no apologies. This frees space for discussions of beauty culture, peer pressure, rape, the music industry, and the club scene. The front matter includes a fairly expansive autobiographical introduction ("Pimpin' Ain't Easy, but Somebody's Got to Do It"). The book includes endnotes, which are primarily bibliographical. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-/upper-division undergraduates; general readers. D.-R. de Lerma Lawrence University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Sharpley-WhitingT. Denean Denean:

T. Denean Sharpley-Whiting is Professor of African American and Diaspora Studies and French at Vanderbilt University, where she also directs the Program in African American and Diaspora Studies and serves as Director of the W. T. Bandy Center for Baudelaire and Modern French Studies. Author of four books, she was described by cultural critic and scholar Michael Eric Dyson as a rising "superstar" among black intellectuals and "one of the country's most brilliant and prolific racial theorists" in the Chicago Sun-Times in 2002. She has also co-edited three volumes, including The Black Feminist Reader.

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