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Resisting History : Gender, Modernity, and Authorship in William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, and Eudora Welty

By: Ladd, Barbara.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Southern Literary Studies: Publisher: Baton Rouge : LSU Press, 2007Edition: 1.Description: 1 online resource (184 p.).ISBN: 9780807143827.Subject(s): American fiction - Southern States - History and criticism | American fiction -- Southern States -- History and criticism | Faulkner, William - Criticism and interpretation | Faulkner, William, 1897-1962 -- Criticism and interpretation | Gender identity in literature | Gender identity in literature | Hurston, Zora Neale - Criticism and interpretation | Hurston, Zora Neale -- Criticism and interpretation | Literature and history - Southern States | Literature and history -- Southern States | Southern States - In literature | Southern States -- In literature | Sublime, The, in literature | Sublime, The, in literature | Welty, Eudora - Criticism and interpretation | Welty, Eudora, 1909-2001 -- Criticism and interpretation | Women in literature | Women in literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Resisting History : Gender, Modernity, and Authorship in William Faulkner, Zora Neale Hurston, and Eudora WeltyDDC classification: 813.5093522 | 813/.5093522 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. The Dynamo and the Virgin: Women, Modernity, and the Sublime in As I Lay Dying; 2. Putting the Colonel In: Eudora Welty's Feminist Poetics; 3. "The Anonymity of a Murmur": History, Memory, and Resistance in Faulkner's A Fable; 4. "Tell Them Two Ti Blancs are Coming": Zora Neale Hurston's "I"'s in Tell My Horse; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y
Summary: In a major reinterpretation, Resisting History reveals that women, as subjects of writing and as writing subjects themselves, played a far more important role in shaping the landscape of modernism than has been previously acknowledged. Here Barbara Ladd offers powerful new readings of three southern writers who reimagined authorship between World War I and the mid-1950s. Resisting History challenges ideas about history as a coherent narrative and about the development of U.S. modernism and points the way to new histories of literary and cultural modernisms in which the work of women shares center stage with the work of men.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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PS261 .L34 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=876359 Available EBL876359

Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1. The Dynamo and the Virgin: Women, Modernity, and the Sublime in As I Lay Dying; 2. Putting the Colonel In: Eudora Welty's Feminist Poetics; 3. "The Anonymity of a Murmur": History, Memory, and Resistance in Faulkner's A Fable; 4. "Tell Them Two Ti Blancs are Coming": Zora Neale Hurston's "I"'s in Tell My Horse; Notes; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y

In a major reinterpretation, Resisting History reveals that women, as subjects of writing and as writing subjects themselves, played a far more important role in shaping the landscape of modernism than has been previously acknowledged. Here Barbara Ladd offers powerful new readings of three southern writers who reimagined authorship between World War I and the mid-1950s. Resisting History challenges ideas about history as a coherent narrative and about the development of U.S. modernism and points the way to new histories of literary and cultural modernisms in which the work of women shares center stage with the work of men.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In looking at the work of three major southern writers, Ladd (Emory Univ.) focuses on elements that clearly bring into question writing and authorship, especially as it pertains to women as authors. She uses exemplary works from each of the three authors: Faulkner's As I Lay Dying and A Fable, Welty's Golden Apples and some of her short stories, and Hurston's Tell My Horse. Ladd demonstrates changing mainstream beliefs about women as subjects in a world emerging from a world war into a state of "industrialization," in which women's mobility and changes in traditional roles provided a great range of possibilities beyond wife and mother. Ladd demonstrates that history is a far less coherent statement than one might suppose. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, researchers, and faculty. C. R. Bloss Columbus State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Barbara Ladd is professor of English at Emory University and the author of Nationalism and the Color Line in George W. Cable, Mark Twain, and William Faulkner.</p>

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