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Afterimages of Slavery : Essays on Appearances in Recent American Films, Literature, Television and Other Media

By: Allen, Marlene D.
Contributor(s): Williams, Seretha D.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Jefferson : McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, 2012Description: 1 online resource (243 p.).ISBN: 9780786490165.Subject(s): American prose literature -- 20th century -- History and criticism | American prose literature -- 21st century -- History and criticism | American prose literature | Slavery in literature | Slavery in mass mediaGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Afterimages of Slavery : Essays on Appearances in Recent American Films, Literature, Television and Other MediaDDC classification: 810.9/3552 | 810.93552 LOC classification: PS374.S58Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Table of Contents; Preface; Part I: Reading and Writing Slavery; Mediation, Misremembering, Creativity, and Healing in Zakes Mda's Cion; Black Women's Ghostly Re-visions of History; Inhabitants of Borderlands; "If I Allow Myself to Listen"; Tricksterism, Masquerades, and the Legacy of the African Diasporic Past in Nalo Hopkinson's Midnight Robber; Written on the Walls; The Laveau Folk Heroine; Part II: Visualizing and Positioning Slavery; Hottentot Venus; Hollywood's White Legal Heroes and the Legacy of Slave Codes; The Slave's Cabin; "Commence the Great Work"; A Comic Routine
The Slavery of the MachineAbout the Contributors; Index
Summary: Since the election of President Barack Obama, many pundits have declared that we are living in a "post-racial America," a culture where the legacy of slavery has been erased. The new essays in this collection, however, point to a resurgence of the theme of slavery in American cultural artifacts from the late twentieth- and twenty-first centuries. Ranging from disciplines as diverse as African American studies, film and television, architectural studies, and science fiction, the essays provide a provocative look into how and why slavery continues to recur as a trope in American popular culture. By exploring how authors, filmmakers, historians, and others engage and challenge the narrative of American slavery, this volume invites further study of slavery in its contemporary forms of human trafficking and forced labor and challenges the misconception that slavery is an event of the past.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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PS374.S5 G34 1996 The Adman in the Parlor : PS374 .S5 N336 2015 The American Short Story Handbook. PS374.S56 -- C87 2003 Out of Touch : PS374.S58 Afterimages of Slavery : PS374.S58 R87 1999eb Neo-slave Narratives : PS374.S68D69 2009 Narrating Class in American Fiction. PS374.S68 H375 2008 A Class of Its Own :

Cover; Table of Contents; Preface; Part I: Reading and Writing Slavery; Mediation, Misremembering, Creativity, and Healing in Zakes Mda's Cion; Black Women's Ghostly Re-visions of History; Inhabitants of Borderlands; "If I Allow Myself to Listen"; Tricksterism, Masquerades, and the Legacy of the African Diasporic Past in Nalo Hopkinson's Midnight Robber; Written on the Walls; The Laveau Folk Heroine; Part II: Visualizing and Positioning Slavery; Hottentot Venus; Hollywood's White Legal Heroes and the Legacy of Slave Codes; The Slave's Cabin; "Commence the Great Work"; A Comic Routine

The Slavery of the MachineAbout the Contributors; Index

Since the election of President Barack Obama, many pundits have declared that we are living in a "post-racial America," a culture where the legacy of slavery has been erased. The new essays in this collection, however, point to a resurgence of the theme of slavery in American cultural artifacts from the late twentieth- and twenty-first centuries. Ranging from disciplines as diverse as African American studies, film and television, architectural studies, and science fiction, the essays provide a provocative look into how and why slavery continues to recur as a trope in American popular culture. By exploring how authors, filmmakers, historians, and others engage and challenge the narrative of American slavery, this volume invites further study of slavery in its contemporary forms of human trafficking and forced labor and challenges the misconception that slavery is an event of the past.

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Marlene D. Allen is an assistant professor of English at Fayetteville State University in North Carolina and has published several articles on African American literature. Seretha D. Williams is an associate professor of English at Augusta State University in Georgia, where she has also served as the interim director for women's studies and the coordinator for minority advising.

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