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A History of Women''s Menstruation from Ancient Greece to the Twenty-First Century : Psychological, Social, Medical, Religious, and Educational Issues

By: Hufnagel, Glenda Lewin.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Lewiston : The Edwin Mellen Press, 2012Edition: 1.Description: 1 online resource (186 p.).ISBN: 9780773411579.Subject(s): Menstruation -- Religious aspects -- History - -20th century | Menstruation -- Social aspects -- Greece -- History -- 20th century | Menstruation --Psychological aspects -- History -- 20st century | Women -- Health and hygiene -- History -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: A History of Women''s Menstruation from Ancient Greece to the Twenty-First Century : Psychological, Social, Medical, Religious, and Educational IssuesDDC classification: 612.6/62 | 612.662 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Title Page; Copyright Information; Dedication; Table of Contents; Foreword; Acknowledgements; Introduction; Chapter 1- The Ancient Construction: The Classical Greek and Roman Period Through the Eighteenth-Century; The Classical Greek and Roman Period; Medieval Europe; Sixteenth-Century Through Eighteenth-Century Europe; Summary; Chapter 2- The Modern Construction: Nineteenth-Century Europe and America ; Medical Explanations of Early Menarche; Menstruation as Rationale Against Girl''s Education; Menstruation and Class Differences; Menstruation and Gynecological Surgery
The Early Psychiatric Management of MenstruationA Response to Medicine: Women''s Religious Reform; Menstruation and Food-Handling Restrictions ; Arguments Against Menstruation as Disability; Medical Explanations of Menstruation; Summary; Chapter 3- The Contemporary Construction: Twentieth and Twenty-First Century Europe and America; Decline in Menarcheal Age; Discovery of Hormonal Influence on Menstruation; Menstruation and Class Differences; Menstruation and the Education of Girls; Emergence of Commercially Produced Menstrual Products; Tampons and Toxic Shock Syndrome
Tampon Safety and Research ActPMS, Menopause, and the selling of Estrogen; The Ovulatory Revolution; Summary; Chapter 4- Implications for Education; General Educational Implications; Educational Implications of the Religious Construction; Educational Implications of the Medical Construction; Educational Implications of the Commercial Construction; Summary; Chapter 5- Summary, Recommendations, Future Research; Summary; Recommendations; Future Research; Refrences; Index
Summary: Hufnagel chronicles the historical inaccuracies in understanding menstruation which have contributed to viewing women as a 'second sex' and perpetuated feelings of shame. Her argument claims that only in the last few decades has science begun to fully understand the issue. Subsequent social and psychological treatment of menstruation in recent years has helped women to have an increased sense of comfort with their bodies. From Ancient Greece where Aristotle claimed that women were closer to animals, to contemporary misunderstandings about menstruation leading to increased acne, which was viewed as a sign of sexual immorality beginning with pubescence, the book tells the tawdry tale of women learning to accept themselves through successive scientific breakthroughs.
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Title Page; Copyright Information; Dedication; Table of Contents; Foreword; Acknowledgements; Introduction; Chapter 1- The Ancient Construction: The Classical Greek and Roman Period Through the Eighteenth-Century; The Classical Greek and Roman Period; Medieval Europe; Sixteenth-Century Through Eighteenth-Century Europe; Summary; Chapter 2- The Modern Construction: Nineteenth-Century Europe and America ; Medical Explanations of Early Menarche; Menstruation as Rationale Against Girl''s Education; Menstruation and Class Differences; Menstruation and Gynecological Surgery

The Early Psychiatric Management of MenstruationA Response to Medicine: Women''s Religious Reform; Menstruation and Food-Handling Restrictions ; Arguments Against Menstruation as Disability; Medical Explanations of Menstruation; Summary; Chapter 3- The Contemporary Construction: Twentieth and Twenty-First Century Europe and America; Decline in Menarcheal Age; Discovery of Hormonal Influence on Menstruation; Menstruation and Class Differences; Menstruation and the Education of Girls; Emergence of Commercially Produced Menstrual Products; Tampons and Toxic Shock Syndrome

Tampon Safety and Research ActPMS, Menopause, and the selling of Estrogen; The Ovulatory Revolution; Summary; Chapter 4- Implications for Education; General Educational Implications; Educational Implications of the Religious Construction; Educational Implications of the Medical Construction; Educational Implications of the Commercial Construction; Summary; Chapter 5- Summary, Recommendations, Future Research; Summary; Recommendations; Future Research; Refrences; Index

Hufnagel chronicles the historical inaccuracies in understanding menstruation which have contributed to viewing women as a 'second sex' and perpetuated feelings of shame. Her argument claims that only in the last few decades has science begun to fully understand the issue. Subsequent social and psychological treatment of menstruation in recent years has helped women to have an increased sense of comfort with their bodies. From Ancient Greece where Aristotle claimed that women were closer to animals, to contemporary misunderstandings about menstruation leading to increased acne, which was viewed as a sign of sexual immorality beginning with pubescence, the book tells the tawdry tale of women learning to accept themselves through successive scientific breakthroughs.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This brief, well-organized book provides a succinct overview of the history of menarche and menstruation from classical Greek and Roman times through the 18th, 19th, and contemporary 20th and 21st centuries in European-American culture. Chapters begin with representative quotations to set the stage for introducing misogynistic bias and limited scholarly historical menstrual research, along with the taboo against speaking about the passage from girl to woman in literature. The strongest chapters are 4 and 5, in which Hufnagel (human relations, Univ. of Oklahoma) discusses educational implications and important recommendations for future research. The author reports that what was a celebrated event during the ancient period, and remains positive for native and nondominant cultures, has been redefined as a curse or even an illness sometimes requiring medical-surgical and/or pharmacological intervention by male-dominated gynecology. She explores the evolution of the average age of menarche and marriage, the level of physical activity during menstruation and pregnancy, class differences, higher education for girls and women, and the role of wife and mother. By the 1950s, menstrual education was largely marketed by commercial producers of disposable pads and tampons. Extensive 49-page reference list and selection of recommended menarcheal education books/films for both girls and boys, health professionals, parents, and educators. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. E. R. Paterson emeritus, SUNY College at Cortland

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