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Neo-Feminist Cinema : Girly Films, Chick Flicks, and Consumer Culture

By: Radner, Hilary.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2011Edition: 1.Description: 1 online resource (442 p.).ISBN: 9780203855218.Subject(s): Feminism and motion pictures | Feminism and motion pictures | Motion pictures for women - United States | Motion pictures for women --United States | Women in motion pictures | Women in motion picturesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Neo-Feminist Cinema : Girly Films, Chick Flicks, and Consumer CultureDDC classification: 791.43/6522 | 791.43082 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Figures; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Chapter 1 Neo-Feminism and the Rise of the Single Girl; Chapter 2 Pretty Woman (1990) and the Girly Film; Chapter 3 Romy and Michele's High School Reunion (1997); Chapter 4 Legally Blonde (2001); Chapter 5 Jennifer Lopez; Chapter 6 Maid in Manhattan (2002); Chapter 7 Hit Movies for "Femmes" Chick Flicks and Chick Lit; Indie Films for the Female Demo: My Big Fat Greek Wedding (Joel Zwick, 2002) and Mamma Mia! (Phyllida Lloyd, 2008); Chapter 8 The Devil Wears Prada (2006); Chapter 9 Sex and the City: The Movie (2008)
Chapter 10 Something's Gotta Give (2003)Conclusion; Notes; Index
Summary: Neo-Feminist Cinema examines how Hollywood has responded to women's changing social roles. Radner pays particular attention to how the contemporary woman's film portrays what some have called postfeminism and what the author redefines as neo-feminism, represented by figures such as Helen Gurley Brown-women for whom work was a necessity, rather than a right or even a privilege. Popular films explored include He's Just Not That Into You, The Devil Wears Prada, Bride Wars, Sex and the City, and many more. 
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PN1995.9.W6R335 2010 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=667831 Available EBL667831

Contents; Figures; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Chapter 1 Neo-Feminism and the Rise of the Single Girl; Chapter 2 Pretty Woman (1990) and the Girly Film; Chapter 3 Romy and Michele's High School Reunion (1997); Chapter 4 Legally Blonde (2001); Chapter 5 Jennifer Lopez; Chapter 6 Maid in Manhattan (2002); Chapter 7 Hit Movies for "Femmes" Chick Flicks and Chick Lit; Indie Films for the Female Demo: My Big Fat Greek Wedding (Joel Zwick, 2002) and Mamma Mia! (Phyllida Lloyd, 2008); Chapter 8 The Devil Wears Prada (2006); Chapter 9 Sex and the City: The Movie (2008)

Chapter 10 Something's Gotta Give (2003)Conclusion; Notes; Index

Neo-Feminist Cinema examines how Hollywood has responded to women's changing social roles. Radner pays particular attention to how the contemporary woman's film portrays what some have called postfeminism and what the author redefines as neo-feminism, represented by figures such as Helen Gurley Brown-women for whom work was a necessity, rather than a right or even a privilege. Popular films explored include He's Just Not That Into You, The Devil Wears Prada, Bride Wars, Sex and the City, and many more. 

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

What has happened to feminist filmmaking in the past several decades? How did it transform itself from a serious consideration of sexual politics and gender roles, at least in mainstream culture, into a series of films that glorify consumerism over all other considerations? That is what Radner would like to know, and as this compact, sharply written book demonstrates, the evidence of this shift in focus and values is all around--for example, in Sex in the City (as a television series and two feature films), the "Romeo and Juliet" falsity of Pretty Woman, the retro-girlishness of Legally Blonde, and the embrace of high fashion and the industry that creates it in The Devil Wears Prada. As entertainment, these films seek to keep viewers in a constant state of "brand consciousness," highlighting shopping and spending as their principal pursuits. As narratives, they resemble the romance novels that stream off the paperback racks in a seemingly endless torrent, offering their viewers escapism but not empowerment. This is a compelling and much-needed book. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty and professionals; general readers. G. A. Foster University of Nebraska--Lincoln

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Hilary Radneris Professor and Foundation Chair of Film and Media Studies at the University of Otago in New Zealand. She is author of Shopping Around: Feminine Culture and the Pursuit of Pleasureand co-editor of several books including New Zealand Cinema: Interpreting History(forthcoming); Jane Campion: Cinema, Nation, Identity; Swinging Single: Representing Sexuality in the 1960s; Constructing the New Consumer Society; and Film Theory Goes to the Movies, also published by Routledge.</p>

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