Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Interdependencies Between Fertility and Women''s Labour Supply.

By: Matysiak, Anna.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.European Studies of Population, 17: Publisher: Dordrecht : Springer, 2011Description: 1 online resource (191 p.).ISBN: 9789400712843.Subject(s): Fertility, Human -- Social aspects -- Europe | Fertility, Human -- Social aspects -- Norway | Fertility, Human -- Social aspects -- Switzerland | Labor supply -- Europe | Labor supply -- Norway | Labor supply -- Switzerland | LinkWomen -- Employment -- Europe | Women -- Employment -- Norway | Women -- Employment -- SwitzerlandGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Interdependencies Between Fertility and Women''s Labour SupplyDDC classification: 331.40 | 331.409481 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Acknowledgements; Contents; List of Figures; List of Tables; 1 Introduction; 1.1 Background and Impetus for the Study; 1.2 Objectives of the Study; 1.3 Major Theoretical Concepts; 1.3.1 Methodological Individualism; 1.3.2 The Concept of Rational Choice; 1.3.3 Life-Course Perspective; 1.4 Relevance and Outline of the Study; 1.5 Limitations of the Study; 1.6 Methodological Notes; 2 Developments in Fertility and Womens Labour Supply in Europe; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Data; 2.3 Macro-level Developments in Fertility and Womens Labour Supply; 2.3.1 Classification of Countries
2.3.2 Developments in Female Labour Force Participation2.3.3 Women''s Labour Supply and Fertility: Temporal Patterns and Cross-Country Differences; 2.4 Effects of Children on Womens Labour Supply; 2.4.1 Labour Force Participation of Mothers; 2.4.2 Part-Time Employment of Mothers; 2.5 Discussion; 3 Fertility and Womens Labour Supply: Theoretical Considerations; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Micro-Economic Approach to Fertility and Womens Labour Supply: A Price-of-Time Model; 3.3 Macro-Contextual Opportunities and Restrictions; 3.3.1 Family Policies; 3.3.1.1 Childcare Services
3.3.1.2 Maternity and Parental Leave Policies3.3.1.3 Statutory Paternity Leaves; 3.3.1.4 Income Transfers; 3.3.2 Labour Market Structures; 3.3.3 Social Norms for Women''s Roles; 3.3.4 Living Standards; 3.3.5 Interplay of Contextual Dimensions; 3.4 The Role of Preferences; 3.5 Measurement Problems and Selection Effects; 3.6 Theoretical Framework: Summary and Implications for the Study; 4 Macro-Context and Its Cross-Country Variation; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Family Policies; 4.2.1 Western Countries -- Overview of the Existing Welfare State Typologies; 4.2.2 Central and Eastern European Countries
4.2.3 Institutional Incompatibilities Between Women''s Employment and Childbearing in Europe: Country Ranking4.3 Labour Market Structures; 4.4 Social Norms for Womens Roles; 4.5 Living Standards; 4.6 Final Country Ranking; 5 Macro-context and the Cross-Country Variation in the Micro-level Relationship Between Fertility and Womens Employment; 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 Meta-Analysis as a Quantitative Literature Review; 5.3 Meta-Sample; 5.4 Critical Review of the Collected Studies; 5.5 Meta-Analytic Techniques; 5.5.1 Effect Size Estimates; 5.5.2 Summary Indicators; 5.5.3 Meta-Regression
5.6 Empirical Findings5.7 Discussion; 6 Womens Employment in Post-Socialist Poland: A Barrier or a Pre-condition to Childbearing; 6.1 Introduction; 6.2 Contextual Opportunities and Restrictions; 6.2.1 Economic Developments and Living Standards; 6.2.2 Family Policies; 6.2.3 Labour Market Structures; 6.2.4 Social Norms for Women''s Roles; 6.2.5 Contextual Opportunities and Restrictions: Concluding Remarks; 6.3 Developments in Fertility and Womens Labour Supply; 6.3.1 Changes in Fertility Patterns and Women''s Orientations Towards Family
6.3.2 Transformations in the Labour Market and Women''s Orientations Towards Paid Work
Summary: The book explores interlinkages between women''s employment and fertility at both a macro- and a micro-level in EU member states, Norway and Switzerland. Similarly as many other studies on the topic, it refers to the cross-country variation in the macro-context for explaining cross-country differences in women''s labour supply and fertility levels. However, in contrast to other studies, which mainly focus on Western Europe, it extends the discussion to Central and Eastern European countries. Furthermore, it looks at the macro-context from a multi-dimensional perspective, indicating its four dimensions as relevant for fertility and women''s employment choices: economic (living standards), institutional (family policies), structural (labour market structures), and cultural (social norms). A unique feature of the study is the development of indices that measure the intensity of institutional, structural, and cultural incompatibilities between women''s employment and fertility. These indices are used for ranking European countries from the perspective of the country-specific conditions for work and family reconciliation.A country where these conditions are the worst, but where women are additionally perceived as important income providers, is picked up for an in-depth empirical study of the interrelationship between fertility and women''s employment choices. Finally, against the review of theoretical concepts predominantly used for studying interdependencies between fertility and women''s labour supply the book assesses the micro-level empirical studies available on the topic and proposes an analytical approach for modelling the two variables. Thereby, it also contributes to methodological developments in the field.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HQ1683 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=763726 Available EBL763726

Acknowledgements; Contents; List of Figures; List of Tables; 1 Introduction; 1.1 Background and Impetus for the Study; 1.2 Objectives of the Study; 1.3 Major Theoretical Concepts; 1.3.1 Methodological Individualism; 1.3.2 The Concept of Rational Choice; 1.3.3 Life-Course Perspective; 1.4 Relevance and Outline of the Study; 1.5 Limitations of the Study; 1.6 Methodological Notes; 2 Developments in Fertility and Womens Labour Supply in Europe; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Data; 2.3 Macro-level Developments in Fertility and Womens Labour Supply; 2.3.1 Classification of Countries

2.3.2 Developments in Female Labour Force Participation2.3.3 Women''s Labour Supply and Fertility: Temporal Patterns and Cross-Country Differences; 2.4 Effects of Children on Womens Labour Supply; 2.4.1 Labour Force Participation of Mothers; 2.4.2 Part-Time Employment of Mothers; 2.5 Discussion; 3 Fertility and Womens Labour Supply: Theoretical Considerations; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Micro-Economic Approach to Fertility and Womens Labour Supply: A Price-of-Time Model; 3.3 Macro-Contextual Opportunities and Restrictions; 3.3.1 Family Policies; 3.3.1.1 Childcare Services

3.3.1.2 Maternity and Parental Leave Policies3.3.1.3 Statutory Paternity Leaves; 3.3.1.4 Income Transfers; 3.3.2 Labour Market Structures; 3.3.3 Social Norms for Women''s Roles; 3.3.4 Living Standards; 3.3.5 Interplay of Contextual Dimensions; 3.4 The Role of Preferences; 3.5 Measurement Problems and Selection Effects; 3.6 Theoretical Framework: Summary and Implications for the Study; 4 Macro-Context and Its Cross-Country Variation; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Family Policies; 4.2.1 Western Countries -- Overview of the Existing Welfare State Typologies; 4.2.2 Central and Eastern European Countries

4.2.3 Institutional Incompatibilities Between Women''s Employment and Childbearing in Europe: Country Ranking4.3 Labour Market Structures; 4.4 Social Norms for Womens Roles; 4.5 Living Standards; 4.6 Final Country Ranking; 5 Macro-context and the Cross-Country Variation in the Micro-level Relationship Between Fertility and Womens Employment; 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 Meta-Analysis as a Quantitative Literature Review; 5.3 Meta-Sample; 5.4 Critical Review of the Collected Studies; 5.5 Meta-Analytic Techniques; 5.5.1 Effect Size Estimates; 5.5.2 Summary Indicators; 5.5.3 Meta-Regression

5.6 Empirical Findings5.7 Discussion; 6 Womens Employment in Post-Socialist Poland: A Barrier or a Pre-condition to Childbearing; 6.1 Introduction; 6.2 Contextual Opportunities and Restrictions; 6.2.1 Economic Developments and Living Standards; 6.2.2 Family Policies; 6.2.3 Labour Market Structures; 6.2.4 Social Norms for Women''s Roles; 6.2.5 Contextual Opportunities and Restrictions: Concluding Remarks; 6.3 Developments in Fertility and Womens Labour Supply; 6.3.1 Changes in Fertility Patterns and Women''s Orientations Towards Family

6.3.2 Transformations in the Labour Market and Women''s Orientations Towards Paid Work

The book explores interlinkages between women''s employment and fertility at both a macro- and a micro-level in EU member states, Norway and Switzerland. Similarly as many other studies on the topic, it refers to the cross-country variation in the macro-context for explaining cross-country differences in women''s labour supply and fertility levels. However, in contrast to other studies, which mainly focus on Western Europe, it extends the discussion to Central and Eastern European countries. Furthermore, it looks at the macro-context from a multi-dimensional perspective, indicating its four dimensions as relevant for fertility and women''s employment choices: economic (living standards), institutional (family policies), structural (labour market structures), and cultural (social norms). A unique feature of the study is the development of indices that measure the intensity of institutional, structural, and cultural incompatibilities between women''s employment and fertility. These indices are used for ranking European countries from the perspective of the country-specific conditions for work and family reconciliation.A country where these conditions are the worst, but where women are additionally perceived as important income providers, is picked up for an in-depth empirical study of the interrelationship between fertility and women''s employment choices. Finally, against the review of theoretical concepts predominantly used for studying interdependencies between fertility and women''s labour supply the book assesses the micro-level empirical studies available on the topic and proposes an analytical approach for modelling the two variables. Thereby, it also contributes to methodological developments in the field.

Description based upon print version of record.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.