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Markets and Bodies : Women, Service Work, and the Making of Inequality in China

By: Otis, Eileen.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Palo Alto : Stanford University Press, 2011Description: 1 online resource (229 p.).ISBN: 9780804778350.Subject(s): Equality - China | Equality -- China | Sex role in the work environment - China | Sex role in the work environment -- China | Women - China - Social conditions | Women -- China -- Social conditions | Women - Employment - China | Women -- Employment -- China | Women service industries workers - China | Women service industries workers -- ChinaGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Markets and Bodies : Women, Service Work, and the Making of Inequality in ChinaDDC classification: 306.360820951 | 331.4/81000951 | 331.40951 | 331.481000951 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Global Markets, Local Bodies; 1. "The Customer Is God": Women and China's New Occupational Landscape; 2. Virtual Personalism: Importing Global Luxury and Emphasized Femininity to the Beijing Transluxury Hotel; 3. Virtuous Professionalism: Localizing Global Luxury at the Kunming Transluxury Hotel; 4. Aspirational Urbanism: Consuming Respect in China's Informal Service Sector; 5. Embodying Consumer Markets at Work; Afterword: Embodiment, the Research, and the Researcher; Notes; References; Index
Summary: Insulated from the dust, noise, and crowds churning outside, China''s luxury hotels are staging areas for the new economic and political landscape of the country. These hotels, along with other emerging service businesses, offer an important, new source of employment for millions of workers, but also bring to light levels of inequality that surpass most developed nations. Examining how gender enables the globalization of markets and how emerging forms of service labor are changing women''s social status in China, Markets and Bodies reveals the forms of social inequality produced by shifts in the economy. No longer working for the common good as defined by the socialist state, service workers are catering to the individual desires of consumers. This economic transition ultimately affords a unique opportunity to investigate the possibilities and current limits for better working conditions for the young women who are enabling the development of capitalism in China.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HD6073 | HD6073.S452 .C668 2011 | HD6073.S452C668 2012 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=816149 Available EBL816149

Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Global Markets, Local Bodies; 1. "The Customer Is God": Women and China's New Occupational Landscape; 2. Virtual Personalism: Importing Global Luxury and Emphasized Femininity to the Beijing Transluxury Hotel; 3. Virtuous Professionalism: Localizing Global Luxury at the Kunming Transluxury Hotel; 4. Aspirational Urbanism: Consuming Respect in China's Informal Service Sector; 5. Embodying Consumer Markets at Work; Afterword: Embodiment, the Research, and the Researcher; Notes; References; Index

Insulated from the dust, noise, and crowds churning outside, China''s luxury hotels are staging areas for the new economic and political landscape of the country. These hotels, along with other emerging service businesses, offer an important, new source of employment for millions of workers, but also bring to light levels of inequality that surpass most developed nations. Examining how gender enables the globalization of markets and how emerging forms of service labor are changing women''s social status in China, Markets and Bodies reveals the forms of social inequality produced by shifts in the economy. No longer working for the common good as defined by the socialist state, service workers are catering to the individual desires of consumers. This economic transition ultimately affords a unique opportunity to investigate the possibilities and current limits for better working conditions for the young women who are enabling the development of capitalism in China.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Otis (sociology, Univ. of Oregon) articulates the nuanced context of gender, ethnicity, and class inequalities in China's urban service workforce. She goes beyond well-explored territories of emotional labor to theorize the embodied labor of the backbone of the rising globalized service and leisure economies: women. Outlining three comprehensive concepts of the differently classed femininities deployed by women service industry workers, Otis explores the tensions between rural and urban identities, service provision, and socialist context. Rural migrant women in the informal sector mask their rural roots through "aspirational urbanism." Workers in a hotel that caters to domestic businessmen differentiate themselves from sex workers though a "virtual professionalism." In a high-end hotel, women are trained to embrace an emphasized femininity and implement a "virtual personalism" to create individualized and special customer service interactions for rich, male, Western clients. Overall, Otis deftly describes how assumptions of essentialized feminine attributes fit neatly into service industry demands for friendly, docile laborers who will cater to male clientele. The author provides refreshing, meticulous, theorized explanations of the naturalization of class distinctions via gender and sexuality in a growing, globalized, leisure economy. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. C. A. Jackson University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Eileen Otis is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of Oregon.

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