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Out on Assignment : Newspaper Women and the Making of Modern Public Space

By: Fahs, Alice.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, 2011Description: 1 online resource (373 p.).ISBN: 9780807869031.Subject(s): Women and journalism - United States - History - 20th century | Women and journalism -- United States -- History -- 20th century | Women in journalism -- History -- United States -- 20th century | Women in journalism - United States - 20th century | Women in journalism - United States - History - 20th century | Women journalists - United States | Women journalists -- United States -- BiographyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Out on Assignment : Newspaper Women and the Making of Modern Public SpaceDDC classification: 070.4082 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Introduction; Chapter one: Among the Newspaper Women; Chapter two: The Woman's Page; Chapter three: Human Interest; Chapter four: Bachelor Girls; Chapter five: Adventure; Chapter six: Work; Chapter seven: Travel; Epilogue: Toward Suffrage; Notes; Selected Bibliography; Acknowledgments; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z
Summary: Out on Assignment illuminates the lives and writings of a lost world of women who wrote for major metropolitan newspapers at the start of the twentieth century. Using extraordinary archival research, Alice Fahs unearths a richly networked community of female journalists drawn by the hundreds to major cities--especially New York--from all parts of the United States. Newspaper women were part of a wave of women seeking new, independent, urban lives, but they struggled to obtain the newspaper work of their dreams. Although some female journalists embraced more adventurous reporting, including stunt work and undercover assignments, many were relegated to the women''s page. However, these intrepid female journalists made the women''s page their own. Fahs reveals how their writings--including celebrity interviews, witty sketches of urban life, celebrations of being "bachelor girls," advice columns, and a campaign in support of suffrage--had far-reaching implications for the creation of new, modern public spaces for American women at the turn of the century. As observers and actors in a new drama of independent urban life, newspaper women used the simultaneously liberating and exploitative nature of their work, Fahs argues, to demonstrate the power of a public voice, both individually and collectively.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PN4872 .F35 2011 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=819535 Available EBL819535

Cover; Contents; Introduction; Chapter one: Among the Newspaper Women; Chapter two: The Woman's Page; Chapter three: Human Interest; Chapter four: Bachelor Girls; Chapter five: Adventure; Chapter six: Work; Chapter seven: Travel; Epilogue: Toward Suffrage; Notes; Selected Bibliography; Acknowledgments; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z

Out on Assignment illuminates the lives and writings of a lost world of women who wrote for major metropolitan newspapers at the start of the twentieth century. Using extraordinary archival research, Alice Fahs unearths a richly networked community of female journalists drawn by the hundreds to major cities--especially New York--from all parts of the United States. Newspaper women were part of a wave of women seeking new, independent, urban lives, but they struggled to obtain the newspaper work of their dreams. Although some female journalists embraced more adventurous reporting, including stunt work and undercover assignments, many were relegated to the women''s page. However, these intrepid female journalists made the women''s page their own. Fahs reveals how their writings--including celebrity interviews, witty sketches of urban life, celebrations of being "bachelor girls," advice columns, and a campaign in support of suffrage--had far-reaching implications for the creation of new, modern public spaces for American women at the turn of the century. As observers and actors in a new drama of independent urban life, newspaper women used the simultaneously liberating and exploitative nature of their work, Fahs argues, to demonstrate the power of a public voice, both individually and collectively.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Although written by an academic for academics, this study of the turn-of-the-20th-century newspaper business and its women practitioners is an accessible cultural history. In seven chapters covering such topics as the personalities of women newspaper writers, the style and impact of papers' popular "women's pages" and human interest stories, and how women writers undertook "stunt" journalism and travel adventures, Fahs (history, Univ. of California, Irvine; The Imagined Civil War: Popular Literature of the North & South, 1861-65) combines quotations from the journalists (from the well-known Nellie Bly to the more obscure, e.g., Margherita Hamm) with primary research and scholarly citations. In discussing how these trendsetters wrote about themselves as "bachelor girls" and adventurers, Fahs also explores how they led the way to women's suffrage and modern ideas of feminism. VERDICT Readers with an interest in media history as well as in women's studies will find this to be an enjoyable and character-driven scholarly book, although its academic style may render it a bit dry for the general history reader.-Sarah Statz Cords, The Reader's Advisor Online (c) Copyright 2011. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Numerous women entered the emerging field of journalism at the turn of the 20th century, but until now they have been, Fahs (history, Univ. of California, Irvine) writes, "hiding in plain sight." The writings of these women not only helped shape the thoughts of women readers but also fostered conversations about culture and politics. Many of these female journalists relished the opportunity to be "out on assignment," doing what they considered real newspaper work. Fahs discusses several shifts that allowed women to enter print journalism: newspapers were seeking new readers, advertisers needed new customers, and editors wanted to create women's pages and features and they wanted women to write them. Women writers made these pages their own, with advice columns, undercover assignments, witty sketches, beauty advice, and recipes. Fahs's well-researched study ends with a chapter that moves toward suffrage. Newspaper writing gave women journalists wide public exposure that was dramatically different from the literary and journalistic writing of the previous century, which emphasized privacy and home. This well-written book includes vintage photographs and graphics. A most informative and enjoyable read. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. R. Ray Mississippi State University

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