Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Blue Collar, Theoretically : A Post-Marxist Approach to Working Class Literature

By: Lavelle, John F.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Jefferson : McFarland & Company, Inc., Publishers, 2011Description: 1 online resource (288 p.).ISBN: 9780786487011.Subject(s): Marxist criticism | Social classes in literature | Working class in literature | Working class writings -- History and criticismGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Blue Collar, Theoretically : A Post-Marxist Approach to Working Class LiteratureDDC classification: 809 | 809/.93355 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Table of Contents; Acknowledgments; Preface; 1. The Praxis of Class; 2. A Study in New Working-Class Studies; 3. A Review of the Discourse of Working- Class Literature; 4. Post Marxist Theories of Class; 5. Postmodern/Poststructuralist Theories of Class and a Theory of the Working Class; 6. A Working- Class Reading of Maggie; Conclusion; Chapter Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: Though Marxism is the dominant philosophical theory applied to class in academia, its real-life inconsistencies, particularly stereotyping, have troubling effects on working class studies. As a result of its hegemony, alternative discourses have been effectively shut out of the academic world. This critical work seeks to establish a new philosophy of class, drawing on disciplines as diverse as sociology, cognitive science, anthropology and psychology and applying a decidedly Weberian hermeneutical lens. Topics covered include a detailed exploration of Marxism, a review of working class literature, post-marxist theories of class and the future of the field.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PN56.L22 L38 2011 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=823683 Available EBL823683

Cover; Table of Contents; Acknowledgments; Preface; 1. The Praxis of Class; 2. A Study in New Working-Class Studies; 3. A Review of the Discourse of Working- Class Literature; 4. Post Marxist Theories of Class; 5. Postmodern/Poststructuralist Theories of Class and a Theory of the Working Class; 6. A Working- Class Reading of Maggie; Conclusion; Chapter Notes; Bibliography; Index

Though Marxism is the dominant philosophical theory applied to class in academia, its real-life inconsistencies, particularly stereotyping, have troubling effects on working class studies. As a result of its hegemony, alternative discourses have been effectively shut out of the academic world. This critical work seeks to establish a new philosophy of class, drawing on disciplines as diverse as sociology, cognitive science, anthropology and psychology and applying a decidedly Weberian hermeneutical lens. Topics covered include a detailed exploration of Marxism, a review of working class literature, post-marxist theories of class and the future of the field.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Lavelle (Florida Institute of Technology) challenges the predominant influence of Marxist theory within working-class studies. By drawing on work of theorists in alternative disciplines--anthropology, cognitive science, psychology, and sociology--he positions class in relation to status and signs of difference at the small-group level. He begins with the fundamentals: the limitations of Marxist theory to rigorously define terms central to the discipline and to engage alternative theories. Lavelle builds his argument through an examination and critique of texts pivotal to working-class studies, in particular to working-class literature. He is methodical in his critique of the problematics of the discourse itself, the positive and negative contributions of established theories by leading figures in the field, and the contradictions and inadequacies of identifying a working-class literary canon. In the final three chapters, the author offers a revision to current practice--one that draws on Bourdieu's and Foucault's post-Marxist theories of class, employs postmodern tenets for working-class readings of any text, and demonstrates a post-Marxist, working-class reading of Stephen Crane's Maggie: A Girl of the Streets and F. Scott Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students through faculty. K. A. Welsch Clarion University of Pennsylvania

Author notes provided by Syndetics

John F. Lavelle is an assistant professor at the Florida Institute of Technology and is the author of numerous journal articles.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.