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Capital Intentions : Female Proprietors in San Francisco, 1850-1920

By: Sparks, Edith.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Luther Hartwell Hodges Series on Business, Society & the State: Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, 2006Description: 1 online resource (348 p.).ISBN: 9780807868201.Subject(s): Business | Businesswomen -- California -- San Francisco -- History | Capital intentions | Women-owned business enterprises -- California -- San Francisco -- HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Capital Intentions : Female Proprietors in San Francisco, 1850-1920DDC classification: 338.70820979461 LOC classification: HD6096.C3 .S638 2006Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Chapter 1. Female Proprietors and the Businesses They Started; Chapter 2. Why San Francisco Women Started Businesses; Chapter 3. How Women Started Businesses; Chapter 4. What It Took to Draw Customers; Chapter 5. Women as Financial Managers; Chapter 6. When Women Went Out of Business; Conclusion; Appendix 1: Note on Sources; Appendix 2: Figures and Tables; Figure A1. Percentage of All Gainfully Occupied Women in the Hospitality Industry; Figure A2. Number of San Francisco Female Proprietors in the Hospitality Industry
Table A1. Female Proprietors in San Francisco as a Percentage of All Gainfully Occupied WomenTable A2. San Francisco Male and Female Populations; Table A3. Women in the San Francisco Directory Employed in Hospitality; Table A4. Retail Dealers in San Francisco in 1920; Table A5. Race and Nativity of Female Proprietors and of Total San Francisco Female Population, 1890; Table A6. San Francisco Female Proprietors in Types of Businesses as Percentage of All Proprietors from Racial/Ethnic Background, 1890
Table A7. San Francisco Female Proprietors in Types of Businesses as Percentage of All Proprietors in Each Category, 1890Table A8. San Francisco Foreign-Born White Female Proprietors by Origin and Type of Business, 1890; Table A9. Race and Nativity of Male Proprietors and of Total San Francisco Male Population, 1890; Table A10. San Francisco Male Proprietors in Types of Businesses as Percentage of All Proprietors in Each Category, 1890; Table A11. San Francisco Foreign-Born White Male Proprietors by Origin and Type of Business, 1890
Table A12. Percentage of Women's Businesses Located on Kearny, Montgomery, Second, Third, and Market StreetsTable A13. Business Failure among San Francisco Female Proprietors; Notes; Selected Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y
Summary: Late 19th-century San Francisco was a booming marketplace in which some women stepped beyond their roles as wives, caregivers, and homemakers to start businesses that combined family concerns with money-making activities. Edith Sparks traces the experiences of these women entrepreneurs, exploring who they were, why they started businesses, how they attracted customers and managed finances, and how they dealt with failure. Using a unique sample of bankruptcy records, credit reports, advertisements, city directories, census reports, and other sources, Sparks argues that women were competitive, economic actors, strategizing how best to capitalize on their skills in the marketplace.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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HD6096.C3 .S638 2006 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=830258 Available EBL830258
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HD6095 .T49 2006eb From Marriage to the Market : HD6095 .W678 2013 Women and Work : HD6096.C3 S63 2006 Capital intentions : HD6096.C3 .S638 2006 Capital Intentions : HD6096.D35 L86 2014 Women and Business Ownership : HD6096.N6 1986 City of women : HD6096.W67 | HD6096.W67H36 2003eb Gender, Work and Space.

Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Chapter 1. Female Proprietors and the Businesses They Started; Chapter 2. Why San Francisco Women Started Businesses; Chapter 3. How Women Started Businesses; Chapter 4. What It Took to Draw Customers; Chapter 5. Women as Financial Managers; Chapter 6. When Women Went Out of Business; Conclusion; Appendix 1: Note on Sources; Appendix 2: Figures and Tables; Figure A1. Percentage of All Gainfully Occupied Women in the Hospitality Industry; Figure A2. Number of San Francisco Female Proprietors in the Hospitality Industry

Table A1. Female Proprietors in San Francisco as a Percentage of All Gainfully Occupied WomenTable A2. San Francisco Male and Female Populations; Table A3. Women in the San Francisco Directory Employed in Hospitality; Table A4. Retail Dealers in San Francisco in 1920; Table A5. Race and Nativity of Female Proprietors and of Total San Francisco Female Population, 1890; Table A6. San Francisco Female Proprietors in Types of Businesses as Percentage of All Proprietors from Racial/Ethnic Background, 1890

Table A7. San Francisco Female Proprietors in Types of Businesses as Percentage of All Proprietors in Each Category, 1890Table A8. San Francisco Foreign-Born White Female Proprietors by Origin and Type of Business, 1890; Table A9. Race and Nativity of Male Proprietors and of Total San Francisco Male Population, 1890; Table A10. San Francisco Male Proprietors in Types of Businesses as Percentage of All Proprietors in Each Category, 1890; Table A11. San Francisco Foreign-Born White Male Proprietors by Origin and Type of Business, 1890

Table A12. Percentage of Women's Businesses Located on Kearny, Montgomery, Second, Third, and Market StreetsTable A13. Business Failure among San Francisco Female Proprietors; Notes; Selected Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y

Late 19th-century San Francisco was a booming marketplace in which some women stepped beyond their roles as wives, caregivers, and homemakers to start businesses that combined family concerns with money-making activities. Edith Sparks traces the experiences of these women entrepreneurs, exploring who they were, why they started businesses, how they attracted customers and managed finances, and how they dealt with failure. Using a unique sample of bankruptcy records, credit reports, advertisements, city directories, census reports, and other sources, Sparks argues that women were competitive, economic actors, strategizing how best to capitalize on their skills in the marketplace.

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