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Gender and lynching : the politics of memory / [edited by] Evelyn M. Simien.

Contributor(s): Simien, Evelyn M, 1974-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York, NY : Palgrave Macmillan, 2011Edition: 1st ed.Description: 1 online resource (xiv, 184 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781137001221 (electronic bk.); 1137001224 (electronic bk.).Subject(s): Lynching -- Sex differences -- United States -- History | African American women -- Violence against -- United States -- History | Rape -- United States -- History | Lynching in literature | Lynching in art | Sexism -- United States -- History | Racism -- United States -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Gender and lynching.DDC classification: 364.1/34 LOC classification: HV6457 | .G46 2011Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction / Evelyn M. Simien -- Mary Turner, hidden memory, and narrative possibility / Julie Buckner Armstrong -- Sisters in motherhood : the politics of race and gender in lynching drama / Koritha Mitchell -- The antislavery roots of African American women's antilynching literature, 1895-1920 / Barbara McCaskill -- "A woman was lynched the other day" : memory, gender, and the limits of traumatic representation / Jennifer D. Williams -- The politics of sexuality in Billie Holiday's "Strange fruit" / Fumiko Sakashita -- Gender, race, and public space : photography and memory in the massacre of East Saint Louis and the Crisis Magazine / Anne Rice / Notes on Contributors / Index.
Summary: Where much of the scholarship on lynching and its victims has focused on African American men, Gender and Lynching is the first to examine African American women in this history. The authorsprobe the reasons and circumstances surrounding the death and torture of African American female victims, employing such methodological approaches as comparative historical work, content and media analysis, and literary criticism.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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HV6457 .G468 2011 (Browse shelf) https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=832202 Available EBL832202

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction / Evelyn M. Simien -- Mary Turner, hidden memory, and narrative possibility / Julie Buckner Armstrong -- Sisters in motherhood : the politics of race and gender in lynching drama / Koritha Mitchell -- The antislavery roots of African American women's antilynching literature, 1895-1920 / Barbara McCaskill -- "A woman was lynched the other day" : memory, gender, and the limits of traumatic representation / Jennifer D. Williams -- The politics of sexuality in Billie Holiday's "Strange fruit" / Fumiko Sakashita -- Gender, race, and public space : photography and memory in the massacre of East Saint Louis and the Crisis Magazine / Anne Rice / Notes on Contributors / Index.

Where much of the scholarship on lynching and its victims has focused on African American men, Gender and Lynching is the first to examine African American women in this history. The authorsprobe the reasons and circumstances surrounding the death and torture of African American female victims, employing such methodological approaches as comparative historical work, content and media analysis, and literary criticism.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Between 1880 and 1960, approximately 150 women were lynched in the US. Approximately 130 of them were black. This is a significant history, and this book argues that black female lynch victims have been forgotten. The six original essays probe, from varying vantage points, why black female lynch victims have been excluded from public memory and the historical scholarship on lynching. The contributors primarily analyze literary texts and journalistic treatments of the lynched female black body between 1880 and 1930. Collectively, the volume argues that black female lynch victims' stories can act as an antidote to the black beast rapist mythology, which they suggest still lingers in the public's memory of lynching. Moreover, the book suggests that the occlusion of black women's stories from lynching narratives only perpetuates the myth. This is a timely and important contribution to the scholarly literature on lynching, a literature that has for too long neglected understanding lynching primarily as a gendered (rather than racial) form of social control. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Graduate students, researchers, and faculty. K. K. Hill Texas Tech University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

EVELYN M. SIMIEN Associate Director of the Humanities Institute at the University of Connecticut, USA.

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