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The British and Irish Short Story Handbook.

By: Malcolm, David.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Wiley Blackwell Literature Handbooks: Publisher: Hoboken : Wiley, 2011Edition: 1.Description: 1 online resource (365 p.).ISBN: 9781444355208.Subject(s): English fiction - Irish authors - History and criticism | Short stories, English - History and criticism | Short storyGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The British and Irish Short Story HandbookDDC classification: 823.0099417 | 823.0109 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
THE BRITISH AND IRISH: SHORT STORY HANDBOOK; Contents; Acknowledgments; Preface; Part 1: A Brief History of the British and Irish Short Story; Part 2: Issues in Short Story Criticism; Definitions; Genre?; Collections; Marginality; Canonicity; Institutions; Part 3: Genres; The Ghost Short Story, the Supernatural Short Story, and the Gothic Short Story; The Science Fiction Short Story and the Fantasy Short Story; The Fable; The Short Story of Exotic Adventure; The Detective and Crime Short Story; The Historical Short Story; The Realist Social-Psychological Short Story
The Metafictional/Experimental Short StoryPart 4: Key Authors; Richard Aldington (1892-1962); J. G. Ballard (1930-2009); Samuel Beckett (1906-1989); Frances Bellerby (1899-1975); John Berger (born 1926); Elizabeth Bowen (1899-1973); Angela Carter (1940-1992); Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930); Joseph Conrad (1857-1924); A. E. Coppard (1878-1957); Hubert Crackanthorpe (1870-1896); Walter de la Mare (1873-1956); Hugh Fleetwood (born 1944); Graham Greene (1904-1991); Thomas Hardy (1840-1928); Henry James (1843-1916); Gabriel Josipovici (born 1940); James Joyce (1882-1941); James Kelman (born 1946)
Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936)Hanif Kureishi (born 1954); James Lasdun (born 1958); Mary Lavin (1912-1996); D. H. Lawrence (1885-1930); Doris Lessing (born 1919); George Mackay Brown (1921-1996); Julian Maclaren-Ross (1912-1964); Bernard MacLaverty (born 1942); Katherine Mansfield (1888-1923); E. A. Markham (1939-2008); W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965); Ian McEwan (born 1948); John McGahern (1934-2006); Michael Moorcock (born 1939); H. H. Munro ("Saki") (1870-1916); Frank O'Connor (1903-1966); Seán O'Faoláin (1900-1991); Mollie Panter-Downes (1906-1997); T. F. Powys (1875-1953)
V. S. Pritchett (1900-1997)Jean Rhys (1890-1979); Alan Sillitoe (1928-2010); Muriel Spark (1918-2006); Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894); Sylvia Townsend Warner (1893-1978); William Trevor (born 1928); H. G. Wells (1866-1946); Oscar Wilde (1854-1900); Virginia Woolf (1882-1941); Part 5: Key Works; Robert Louis Stevenson, "Markheim" (1885); Oscar Wilde, "The Canterville Ghost: A Hylo-Idealistic Romance" (1887); Oscar Wilde, "The Selfish Giant" (1888); Arthur Conan Doyle, "The Adventure of the Engineer's Thumb" (1892); Hubert Crackanthorpe, "Modern Melodrama" (1895)
Henry James, "The Altar of the Dead" (1895)Joseph Conrad, "Amy Foster" (1901); George Moore, "Home Sickness" (1903); H. G. Wells, "The Valley of Spiders" (1903); M. R. James, "Canon Alberic's Scrap-Book" (1904); H. H. Munro ("Saki"), "Sredni Vashtar" (1911); James Joyce, "An Encounter" (1914); D. H. Lawrence, "Tickets, Please" (1919); Virginia Woolf, "Kew Gardens" (1919); Katherine Mansfield, "The Stranger" (1921); A. E. Coppard, "The Higgler" (1925); Rudyard Kipling, "The Gardener" (1926); Jean Rhys, "Mannequin" (1927); W. Somerset Maugham, "Footprints in the Jungle" (1927)
T. F. Powys, "John Pardy and the Waves" (1929)
Summary: The British and Irish Short Story Handbook guides readers through the development of the short story and the unique critical issues involved in discussions of short fiction. It includes a wide-ranging analysis of non-canonical and non-realist writers as well as the major authors and their works, providing a comprehensive and much-needed appraisal of this area. Guides readers through the development of the short story and critical issues involved in discussions of short fictionOffers a detailed discussion of the range of genres in the British and Irish short storyIncludes extensive analysis of non-canonical writers, such as Hubert Crackanthorpe, Ella D'Arcy, T.F. Powys, A.E. Coppard, Julian Maclaren-Ross, Mollie Panter-Downes, Denton Welch, and Sylvia Townsend WarnerProvide a wide-ranging discussion of non-realist and experimental short storiesIncludes a large section on the British short story in the Second World War
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THE BRITISH AND IRISH: SHORT STORY HANDBOOK; Contents; Acknowledgments; Preface; Part 1: A Brief History of the British and Irish Short Story; Part 2: Issues in Short Story Criticism; Definitions; Genre?; Collections; Marginality; Canonicity; Institutions; Part 3: Genres; The Ghost Short Story, the Supernatural Short Story, and the Gothic Short Story; The Science Fiction Short Story and the Fantasy Short Story; The Fable; The Short Story of Exotic Adventure; The Detective and Crime Short Story; The Historical Short Story; The Realist Social-Psychological Short Story

The Metafictional/Experimental Short StoryPart 4: Key Authors; Richard Aldington (1892-1962); J. G. Ballard (1930-2009); Samuel Beckett (1906-1989); Frances Bellerby (1899-1975); John Berger (born 1926); Elizabeth Bowen (1899-1973); Angela Carter (1940-1992); Arthur Conan Doyle (1859-1930); Joseph Conrad (1857-1924); A. E. Coppard (1878-1957); Hubert Crackanthorpe (1870-1896); Walter de la Mare (1873-1956); Hugh Fleetwood (born 1944); Graham Greene (1904-1991); Thomas Hardy (1840-1928); Henry James (1843-1916); Gabriel Josipovici (born 1940); James Joyce (1882-1941); James Kelman (born 1946)

Rudyard Kipling (1865-1936)Hanif Kureishi (born 1954); James Lasdun (born 1958); Mary Lavin (1912-1996); D. H. Lawrence (1885-1930); Doris Lessing (born 1919); George Mackay Brown (1921-1996); Julian Maclaren-Ross (1912-1964); Bernard MacLaverty (born 1942); Katherine Mansfield (1888-1923); E. A. Markham (1939-2008); W. Somerset Maugham (1874-1965); Ian McEwan (born 1948); John McGahern (1934-2006); Michael Moorcock (born 1939); H. H. Munro ("Saki") (1870-1916); Frank O'Connor (1903-1966); Seán O'Faoláin (1900-1991); Mollie Panter-Downes (1906-1997); T. F. Powys (1875-1953)

V. S. Pritchett (1900-1997)Jean Rhys (1890-1979); Alan Sillitoe (1928-2010); Muriel Spark (1918-2006); Robert Louis Stevenson (1850-1894); Sylvia Townsend Warner (1893-1978); William Trevor (born 1928); H. G. Wells (1866-1946); Oscar Wilde (1854-1900); Virginia Woolf (1882-1941); Part 5: Key Works; Robert Louis Stevenson, "Markheim" (1885); Oscar Wilde, "The Canterville Ghost: A Hylo-Idealistic Romance" (1887); Oscar Wilde, "The Selfish Giant" (1888); Arthur Conan Doyle, "The Adventure of the Engineer's Thumb" (1892); Hubert Crackanthorpe, "Modern Melodrama" (1895)

Henry James, "The Altar of the Dead" (1895)Joseph Conrad, "Amy Foster" (1901); George Moore, "Home Sickness" (1903); H. G. Wells, "The Valley of Spiders" (1903); M. R. James, "Canon Alberic's Scrap-Book" (1904); H. H. Munro ("Saki"), "Sredni Vashtar" (1911); James Joyce, "An Encounter" (1914); D. H. Lawrence, "Tickets, Please" (1919); Virginia Woolf, "Kew Gardens" (1919); Katherine Mansfield, "The Stranger" (1921); A. E. Coppard, "The Higgler" (1925); Rudyard Kipling, "The Gardener" (1926); Jean Rhys, "Mannequin" (1927); W. Somerset Maugham, "Footprints in the Jungle" (1927)

T. F. Powys, "John Pardy and the Waves" (1929)

The British and Irish Short Story Handbook guides readers through the development of the short story and the unique critical issues involved in discussions of short fiction. It includes a wide-ranging analysis of non-canonical and non-realist writers as well as the major authors and their works, providing a comprehensive and much-needed appraisal of this area. Guides readers through the development of the short story and critical issues involved in discussions of short fictionOffers a detailed discussion of the range of genres in the British and Irish short storyIncludes extensive analysis of non-canonical writers, such as Hubert Crackanthorpe, Ella D'Arcy, T.F. Powys, A.E. Coppard, Julian Maclaren-Ross, Mollie Panter-Downes, Denton Welch, and Sylvia Townsend WarnerProvide a wide-ranging discussion of non-realist and experimental short storiesIncludes a large section on the British short story in the Second World War

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Here, Malcolm (Univ. of Gdansk, Poland) offers an accessible guide for undergraduates. The short story emerged later in Great Britain than elsewhere in Europe. The term "short story" did not appear in the Oxford English Dictionary (online version, CH, May'11, 48-4812) until the 1930s, and short stories were not anthologized as a distinct genre until then. Malcolm's excellent introduction discusses the literary and historical development of the genre and includes a separate discussion of the Irish short story. An especially helpful section summarizes literary scholars' attempts to define the short story. Is it characterized solely by length? How have anthologies, the literary canon, and the publishing industry shaped the form? What is the significance of subgenres such as the fable, science fiction, and experimental fiction? Biographical sketches of major authors and the explication of nearly 50 key works, from Robert Louis Stevenson to China Mieville, are included. Overall, this is a useful introduction, particularly for libraries looking for a briefer alternative to the comprehensive A Companion to the British and Irish Short Story, edited by C. A. Malcolm and D. Malcolm (CH, Apr'09, 46-4281), or The Facts on File Companion to the British Short Story, edited by A. Maunder (CH, Sep'07, 45-0013). Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-level undergraduates and general readers. L. R. Braunstein Dartmouth College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> David Malcolm is Professor of English Literature at the University of Gdañsk. He is co-author (with Cheryl Alexander Malcolm) of Jean Rhys: A Study of the Short Fiction (1996), and author of Understanding Ian McEwan (2002), Understanding Graham Swift (2003) and Understanding John McGahern (2007). He is co-editor (with Cheryl Alexander Malcolm) of British and Irish Short-Fiction Writers, 1945-2000 , Dictionary of Literary Biography Vol. 319 (2006) and A Companion to the British and Irish Short Story (Wiley-Blackwell, 2008).</p>

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