A Companion to Modern British and Irish Drama : 1880 - 2005

By: Luckhurst, MaryMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandBlackwell companions to literature and culture: Publisher: Hoboken : Wiley, 2008Edition: 1Description: 1 online resource (604 p.)ISBN: 9780470751473Subject(s): England - Intellectual life - 20th century | English drama - 20th century - History and criticism | English drama - Irish authors - History and criticism | English drama | Ireland - Intellectual life - 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: A Companion to Modern British and Irish Drama : 1880 - 2005DDC classification: 822.909 | 822/.9109 LOC classification: PR736.C575 2006Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
A COMPANION TO MODERNBRITISH AND I RISHDRAMA; Contents; Acknowledgements; List of Illustrations; Notes on Contributors; Introduction; Part I Contexts; 1 Domestic and Imperial Politics in Britain and Ireland: The Testimony of Irish Theatre; 2 Reinventing England; 3 Ibsen in the English Theatre in the Fin de Siècle; 4 New Woman Drama; Part II Mapping New Ground, 1900-1939; 5 Shaw among the Artists; 6 Granville Barker and the Court Dramatists; 7 Gregory, Yeats and Ireland''s Abbey Theatre; 8 Suffrage Theatre: Community Activism and Political Commitment; 9 Unlocking Synge Today
10 Sean O''Casey''s Powerful Fireworks11 Auden and Eliot: Theatres of the Thirties; Part III England, Class and Empire, 1939-1990; 12 Empire and Class in the Theatre of John Arden and Margaretta D''Arcy; 13 When Was the Golden Age? Narratives of Loss and Decline: John Osborne, Arnold Wesker and Rodney Ackland; 14 A Commercial Success: Women Playwrights in the 1950s; 15 Home Thoughts from Abroad: Mustapha Matura; 16 The Remains of the British Empire: The Plays of Winsome Pinnock; Part IV Comedy; 17 Wilde''s Comedies; 18 Always Acting: Noël Coward and the Performing Self
19 Beckett''s Divine Comedy20 Form and Ethics in the Comedies of Brendan Behan; 21 Joe Orton: Anger, Artifice and Absurdity; 22 Alan Ayckbourn: Experiments in Comedy; 23 ''They Both Add up to Me'': The Logic of Tom Stoppard''s Dialogic Comedy; 24 Stewart Parker''s Comedy of Terrors; Part V War and Terror; 25 A Wounded Stage: Drama and World War I; 26 Staging ''the Holocaust'' in England; 27 Troubling Perspectives: Northern Ireland, the ''Troubles'' and Drama; 28 On War: Charles Wood''s Military Conscience; 29 Torture in the Plays of Harold Pinter; 30 Sarah Kane: From Terror to Trauma
Part VI Theatre since 196831 Theatre since 1968; 32 Lesbian and Gay Theatre: All Queer on the West End Front; 33 Edward Bond: Maker of Myths; 34 John McGrath and Popular Political Theatre; 35 David Hare and Political Playwriting: Between the Third Way and the Permanent Way; 36 Left in Front: David Edgar''s Political Theatre; 37 Liz Lochhead: Writer and Re-Writer: Stories, Ancient and Modern; 38 ''Spirits that Have Become Mean and Broken'': Tom Murphy and the ''Famine'' of Modern Ireland; 39 Caryl Churchill: Feeling Global; 40 Howard Barker and the Theatre of Catastrophe
41 Reading History in the Plays of Brian Friel42 Marina Carr: Violence and Destruction: Language, Space and Landscape; 43 Scrubbing up Nice? Tony Harrison''s Stagings of the Past; 44 The Question of Multiculturalism: The Plays of Roy Williams; 45 Ed Thomas: Jazz Pictures in the Gaps of Language; 46 Theatre and Technology; Index
Summary: This wide-ranging Companion to Modern British and Irish Drama offers challenging analyses of a range of plays in their political contexts. It explores the cultural, social, economic and institutional agendas that readers need to engage with in order to appreciate modern theatre in all its complexity.An authoritative guide to modern British and Irish drama.Engages with theoretical discourses challenging a canon that has privileged London as well as white English males and realism.Topics covered include: national, regional and fringe theatres; post-colonial stages and multiculturalism; feminist and queer theatres; sex and consumerism; technology and globalisation; representations of war, terrorism, and trauma.
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A COMPANION TO MODERNBRITISH AND I RISHDRAMA; Contents; Acknowledgements; List of Illustrations; Notes on Contributors; Introduction; Part I Contexts; 1 Domestic and Imperial Politics in Britain and Ireland: The Testimony of Irish Theatre; 2 Reinventing England; 3 Ibsen in the English Theatre in the Fin de Siècle; 4 New Woman Drama; Part II Mapping New Ground, 1900-1939; 5 Shaw among the Artists; 6 Granville Barker and the Court Dramatists; 7 Gregory, Yeats and Ireland''s Abbey Theatre; 8 Suffrage Theatre: Community Activism and Political Commitment; 9 Unlocking Synge Today

10 Sean O''Casey''s Powerful Fireworks11 Auden and Eliot: Theatres of the Thirties; Part III England, Class and Empire, 1939-1990; 12 Empire and Class in the Theatre of John Arden and Margaretta D''Arcy; 13 When Was the Golden Age? Narratives of Loss and Decline: John Osborne, Arnold Wesker and Rodney Ackland; 14 A Commercial Success: Women Playwrights in the 1950s; 15 Home Thoughts from Abroad: Mustapha Matura; 16 The Remains of the British Empire: The Plays of Winsome Pinnock; Part IV Comedy; 17 Wilde''s Comedies; 18 Always Acting: Noël Coward and the Performing Self

19 Beckett''s Divine Comedy20 Form and Ethics in the Comedies of Brendan Behan; 21 Joe Orton: Anger, Artifice and Absurdity; 22 Alan Ayckbourn: Experiments in Comedy; 23 ''They Both Add up to Me'': The Logic of Tom Stoppard''s Dialogic Comedy; 24 Stewart Parker''s Comedy of Terrors; Part V War and Terror; 25 A Wounded Stage: Drama and World War I; 26 Staging ''the Holocaust'' in England; 27 Troubling Perspectives: Northern Ireland, the ''Troubles'' and Drama; 28 On War: Charles Wood''s Military Conscience; 29 Torture in the Plays of Harold Pinter; 30 Sarah Kane: From Terror to Trauma

Part VI Theatre since 196831 Theatre since 1968; 32 Lesbian and Gay Theatre: All Queer on the West End Front; 33 Edward Bond: Maker of Myths; 34 John McGrath and Popular Political Theatre; 35 David Hare and Political Playwriting: Between the Third Way and the Permanent Way; 36 Left in Front: David Edgar''s Political Theatre; 37 Liz Lochhead: Writer and Re-Writer: Stories, Ancient and Modern; 38 ''Spirits that Have Become Mean and Broken'': Tom Murphy and the ''Famine'' of Modern Ireland; 39 Caryl Churchill: Feeling Global; 40 Howard Barker and the Theatre of Catastrophe

41 Reading History in the Plays of Brian Friel42 Marina Carr: Violence and Destruction: Language, Space and Landscape; 43 Scrubbing up Nice? Tony Harrison''s Stagings of the Past; 44 The Question of Multiculturalism: The Plays of Roy Williams; 45 Ed Thomas: Jazz Pictures in the Gaps of Language; 46 Theatre and Technology; Index

This wide-ranging Companion to Modern British and Irish Drama offers challenging analyses of a range of plays in their political contexts. It explores the cultural, social, economic and institutional agendas that readers need to engage with in order to appreciate modern theatre in all its complexity.An authoritative guide to modern British and Irish drama.Engages with theoretical discourses challenging a canon that has privileged London as well as white English males and realism.Topics covered include: national, regional and fringe theatres; post-colonial stages and multiculturalism; feminist and queer theatres; sex and consumerism; technology and globalisation; representations of war, terrorism, and trauma.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Divided into six parts, these 48 essays address political and historical context, influential mid- and late-20th-century playwrights, class and empire, comic modes, war and terror on stage, and major developments post 1968. Luckhurst (Univ. of York, UK; Dramaturgy: A Revolution in Theatre, CH, Dec'06, 44-2042) argues for a reassessment of "Englishness," and, accordingly, this companion emphasizes postcolonial and feminist agendas and questions the dominance of urban locales and certain theatrical institutions. For instance, in her essay "New Woman Drama" Sally Ledger surveys neglected fin de siecle female playwrights, and Gabriele Griffin's "The Remains of the British Empire" examines how Winsome Pinnock addressed issues preoccupying postcolonial theorists. John Lennard's "Staging 'the Holocaust' in England" surveys problems representing a Sho'ah, his preferred term; in "On War: Charles Wood's Military Conscience," Dawn Fowler argues that Wood's dramas best question all things military. David Pattie's "Theatre since 1968" opens the final section, which also offers essays on lesbian and gay theater and on Edward Bond, Liz Lochhead, David Edgar, and Marina Carr, among others. Each essay includes notes and lists of primary and secondary reading; combined, the essays provide a necessary reassessment of British and Irish drama. Summing Up: Recommended. Lower-/upper-division undergraduates; general readers. J. C. Kohl emerita, Dutchess Community College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Mary Luckhurst is Senior Lecturer in Modern Drama at the University of York. She is the author of Dramaturgy: A Revolution in Theatre (2006), co-author of The Drama Handbook: A Guide to Reading Plays (2002), and co-editor of Theatre and Celebrity in Britain, 1660-2000 (2005). She has also edited The Creative Writing Handbook: Techniques for New Writers (1996), On Directing: Interviews with Directors (1999) , and On Acting: Interviews with Actors (2002). She was awarded a University of York outstanding teaching award in 2006 and is also one of the Higher Education Academy's National Teaching Fellows.

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