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Memory Is Another Country : Women of the Vietnamese Diaspora

By: NGUYEN, NATHALIE HUYNH CHAU.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Non-Series: Publisher: Westport : ABC-CLIO, 2009Description: 1 online resource (227 p.).ISBN: 9780313360282.Subject(s): Australia -- Ethnic relations | Memory -- Social aspects | Vietnam -- History -- 1975- | Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- Personal narratives, Vietnamese | Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- Social aspects | Vietnamese -- Australia -- Interviews | Vietnamese diaspora | Women -- Vietnam -- Biography | Women -- Vietnam -- Social conditions | Women immigrants -- Social conditionsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Memory Is Another Country : Women of the Vietnamese DiasporaDDC classification: 305.48/895922 | 305.48895922 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; List of Illustrations; Preface and Acknowledgments; Introduction; Chapter 1. Lost Photographs; Chapter 2. Sisters and Memories; Chapter 3. Women in Uniform; Chapter 4. Fragments of War; Chapter 5. Love across Cultures; Chapter 6. Return Journeys; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: The act of remembering is a means of bringing the past alive, and an imaginative way of dealing with loss. It has been the subject of much recent scholarship, and is of particular relevance at a time of widespread transnational migration. For refugees, memory acquires a particular power and poignancy, since the country that they remember is now lost to them. The memories of Vietnamese refugees have been molded by their experience of diaspora, and many guard these memories with silence, a silence that relates not only to the departure from Vietnam and the exodus itself, but also to the impact of loss and grief on individual family members. In one of the twentieth century''s major diasporas, more than two million Vietnamese left their country after the end of the Vietnam War in 1975. They settled in countries as diverse as Norway and Israel and established large, thriving communities in the United States, Australia, Canada, and France. Vietnamese women played a major part in this migration.||
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
DS559.913 .N46 2009 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=539644 Available EBL539644

Cover; Contents; List of Illustrations; Preface and Acknowledgments; Introduction; Chapter 1. Lost Photographs; Chapter 2. Sisters and Memories; Chapter 3. Women in Uniform; Chapter 4. Fragments of War; Chapter 5. Love across Cultures; Chapter 6. Return Journeys; Conclusion; Notes; Bibliography; Index

The act of remembering is a means of bringing the past alive, and an imaginative way of dealing with loss. It has been the subject of much recent scholarship, and is of particular relevance at a time of widespread transnational migration. For refugees, memory acquires a particular power and poignancy, since the country that they remember is now lost to them. The memories of Vietnamese refugees have been molded by their experience of diaspora, and many guard these memories with silence, a silence that relates not only to the departure from Vietnam and the exodus itself, but also to the impact of loss and grief on individual family members. In one of the twentieth century''s major diasporas, more than two million Vietnamese left their country after the end of the Vietnam War in 1975. They settled in countries as diverse as Norway and Israel and established large, thriving communities in the United States, Australia, Canada, and France. Vietnamese women played a major part in this migration.||

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Univ. of Melbourne professor Nguyen uses interviews with 42 Vietnamese women in Australia to better understand the exodus of 2 million Vietnamese refugees following North Vietnam's conquest of South Vietnam in 1975. Political science dominated the first scholarship on this topic. Then came verbatim oral histories. Nguyen makes a brilliant contribution to the third wave of scholarship by examining how memory and narrative shape the intrapersonal meaning of traumatic events. Her focus on women is valuable because they are often the custodians of stories. Women also create counter-stories, such as those of Vietnamese female veterans that problematize conventional historical accounts. While sensitive to the Holocaust and its literature, Nguyen breaks new ground in the study of trauma narratives by analyzing elements specific to Vietnamese culture. These cultural factors include geographic imagery, Buddhism, sibling bonds, and national pride. Nguyen also reveals the influence of cross-cultural intermarriage on Vietnamese women's stories of loss and grief. Finally, the author persuasively argues that trauma narratives unfold within a global diaspora comprising Vietnamese communities in the US, Canada, Australia, France, and other countries. Twenty-two photographs of the women add a deep poignancy to this pathbreaking book. Summing Up: Essential. All levels/libraries. J. Hein University of Wisconsin--Eau Claire

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Nathalie Huynh Chau Nguyen holds an ARC Australian Research Fellowship at the Australian Centre, School of Historical Studies, University of Melbourne. She was shortlisted for the 2007 NSW Premier's Literary Award for Voyage of Hope: Vietnamese Australian Women's Narratives (2005).</p>

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