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Becoming an Engineer in Public Universities : Pathways for Women and Minorities

By: Borman, Kathryn M.
Contributor(s): Halperin, Rhoda H | Tyson, Will.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Palgrave Studies in Urban Education: Publisher: New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010Description: 1 online resource (224 p.).ISBN: 9780230106826.Subject(s): College dropouts --United States --Prevention | Minority college students --Florida --Case studies | Women engineering students --Florida --Case studiesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Becoming an Engineer in Public Universities : Pathways for Women and MinoritiesDDC classification: 378.16913 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; List of Figures; Acknowledgments; Series Editors' Foreword; One: Introduction: The Scarcity of Scientists and Engineers, a Hidden Crisis in the United States; Two: Producing STEM Graduates in Florida: Understanding the Florida Context; Three: To Stay or to Switch? Why Students Leave Engineering Programs; Four: Pedagogy and Preparation: Learning to be an Engineer; Five: Program Climate: Engineering Social and Academic Fit; Six: Program Culture: How Departmental Values Facilitate Program Efficacy
Seven: Making the Transition: The Two-to Four-Year Institution Transfer ExperienceEight: Voices from the Field: Strategies for Enhancing Engineering Programs; References; List of Contributors; Index
Summary: Based on research conducted in a three year, mixed-method, multi-site National Science Foundation, Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Talent Expansion Program Project, this book offers a comprehensive look into how engineering department culture and climate impacts the successful retention of female and minority college students.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
T74.F6B43 2010 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=623797 Available EBL623797

Cover; Contents; List of Figures; Acknowledgments; Series Editors' Foreword; One: Introduction: The Scarcity of Scientists and Engineers, a Hidden Crisis in the United States; Two: Producing STEM Graduates in Florida: Understanding the Florida Context; Three: To Stay or to Switch? Why Students Leave Engineering Programs; Four: Pedagogy and Preparation: Learning to be an Engineer; Five: Program Climate: Engineering Social and Academic Fit; Six: Program Culture: How Departmental Values Facilitate Program Efficacy

Seven: Making the Transition: The Two-to Four-Year Institution Transfer ExperienceEight: Voices from the Field: Strategies for Enhancing Engineering Programs; References; List of Contributors; Index

Based on research conducted in a three year, mixed-method, multi-site National Science Foundation, Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Talent Expansion Program Project, this book offers a comprehensive look into how engineering department culture and climate impacts the successful retention of female and minority college students.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This work is based on a three-year, National Science Foundation-sponsored study of the culture and climate of engineering education at two- and four-year public universities in Florida. Thirteen researchers use sociological and anthropological methods to investigate the limitations and potentialities of higher education for giving women and members of minority groups increased access to engineering study. Theoretically grounded in "political economy, practice theory, and person-environment fit," the researchers used mixed methods to collect data from administrators, faculty, and students. Although two to three contributors coauthor each chapter, the authorial voice is consistent throughout. Through an analysis of culture, climate, and curriculum at four universities, the early chapters illustrate obstacles students face and strategies for addressing barriers. Chapter 3 contextualizes obstacles in a discussion of "switchers," students who transfer out of engineering programs, and chapter 4 focuses on retention, values, student support, and social networks. The study illustrates the experiences of women and members of minority groups who experience the engineering climate differently than their white, male counterparts do. Chapter 7 addresses various college pathways, including the transition from community college to four-year institution. Editors and contributors make policy recommendations throughout the volume. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. W. K. Bauchspies Georgia Institute of Technology

Author notes provided by Syndetics

KATHRYN M. BOORMAN is Professor of Anthropology and lead researcher at the Alliance for Applied Research in Anthropology and Education in the Department of Anthropology at the University of South Florida, USA. <br> <br> WILL TYSON is Assistant Professor of Sociology and senior research associate at the Alliance for Applied Research in Anthropology and Education in the Department of Anthropology at the University of South Florida, USA. <br> <br> RHODA HALPERIN is a Fellow of the Society for Applied Anthropology and was most recently Professor of Anthropology at Montclair State University and Professor Emerita in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Cincinnati, USA.<br>

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