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African Women and Apartheid : Migration and Settlement in South Africa

By: Lee, Rebekah.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: London : I.B.Tauris, 2009Edition: 1.Description: 1 online resource (297 p.).ISBN: 9780857710093.Subject(s): Apartheid -- South Africa | Women -- South Africa -- Social conditions -- 20th centuryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: African Women and Apartheid : Migration and Settlement in South AfricaDDC classification: 305.488968 LOC classification: HQ1800.5Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Abbreviations; Illustrations; Acknowledgements; Introduction: Location, Method, Meaning; 1. Mapping Cape Town''s Historical and Political Geography, 1948-200; 2. Structure and Strategy in African Households; 3. Home Improvement, Self Improvement: Renovations and the Reconstruction of ''Home''; 4. Hearth and Home: Energy Resourcing and Consumption in an Urban Environment; 5. ''Beloved'' Unions? Associational Life in Town; 6. ''Moving'' Memories: Urbanizing Identities; Conclusion; Appendix; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: In this compelling study, Rebekah Lee explores the process and consequences of settlement through the everyday lives and testimonies of three generations of African women in Cape Town during the apartheid (1948-94) and post-apartheid periods. How did African women experience apartheid? How did they create a sense of belonging in a city that actively denied and resisted their presence? Through detailed analyses of women''s management of domestic economies, their participation in township social organizations, their home renovation priorities and patterns of energy use, this study evokes a larger history of gendered and generational struggles over identity, place and belonging. It provides a deeper and more nuanced understanding of African women in apartheid and post-apartheid society, and of urbanization in South Africa. Drawing together scholarship and new methodologies from anthropology, history, human geography and development studies, African Women and Apartheid will be valuable to anyone with interests in South Africa, gender, urbanization, the African family, oral history and memory.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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HQ1800.5 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=676881 Available EBL676881

Cover; Contents; Abbreviations; Illustrations; Acknowledgements; Introduction: Location, Method, Meaning; 1. Mapping Cape Town''s Historical and Political Geography, 1948-200; 2. Structure and Strategy in African Households; 3. Home Improvement, Self Improvement: Renovations and the Reconstruction of ''Home''; 4. Hearth and Home: Energy Resourcing and Consumption in an Urban Environment; 5. ''Beloved'' Unions? Associational Life in Town; 6. ''Moving'' Memories: Urbanizing Identities; Conclusion; Appendix; Notes; Bibliography; Index

In this compelling study, Rebekah Lee explores the process and consequences of settlement through the everyday lives and testimonies of three generations of African women in Cape Town during the apartheid (1948-94) and post-apartheid periods. How did African women experience apartheid? How did they create a sense of belonging in a city that actively denied and resisted their presence? Through detailed analyses of women''s management of domestic economies, their participation in township social organizations, their home renovation priorities and patterns of energy use, this study evokes a larger history of gendered and generational struggles over identity, place and belonging. It provides a deeper and more nuanced understanding of African women in apartheid and post-apartheid society, and of urbanization in South Africa. Drawing together scholarship and new methodologies from anthropology, history, human geography and development studies, African Women and Apartheid will be valuable to anyone with interests in South Africa, gender, urbanization, the African family, oral history and memory.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Using archival and oral evidence, including the life histories of three generations of African women, Lee (Goldsmiths College, Univ. of London) constructs a social and cultural history of African women in Cape Town, South Africa, from 1948 to 2000. Chronicling women's success in establishing urban homes in the face of massive resistance by the apartheid state, the author traces women's movements from rural areas into multiracial informal settlements in Cape Town and finally into government-run African townships on the city's outskirts. She details the establishment of multigenerational matriarchal households with women as the main providers, as men increasingly absented themselves from domestic life. Exploring women's survival strategies, political involvement, and religious, economic, and civic associations, Lee shows how women shaped their environments and how their experiences changed over time. This fascinating account, punctuated with rich interview excerpts, deepens understanding of women's experiences of apartheid and its aftermath. Its significance would have been even greater had Lee broadened her oral database, which included only six multigenerational families. Summing Up: Recommended. Academic libraries, scholars, and graduate students. E. S. Schmidt Loyola University Maryland

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