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Feminist Generations : The Persistence of the Radical Women''s Movement

By: Whittier, Nancy.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Women In The Political Economy: Publisher: Philadelphia : Temple University Press, 2010Description: 1 online resource (320 p.).ISBN: 9781439905357.Subject(s): Feminism -- United States | Radicalism -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Feminist Generations : The Persistence of the Radical Women''s MovementDDC classification: 305.42 | 305.42/0973 | 305.420973 LOC classification: HQ1154HQ1154 .W49 1995HQ1154.W49HQ1154.W49 1995Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1: Radical Feminism in Columbus, Ohio; 2: The Evolution of Radical Feminist Identity; 3: Changers and the Changed: Radical Feminists in the Reagan Years; 4: Keeping the Faith: Working for Social Change; 5: United We Stand: The Impact of the Women''s Movement on Other Social Movements; 6: Feminists in the "Postfeminist" Age: The Women''s Movement in the I980s; 7: The Next Wave; Conclusion: The Persistence and Transformation of Social Movements; Appendix: Women''s Movement Organizations and Dates, Columbus, Ohio; Notes; Index
Summary: The radical feminist movement has undergone significant transformation over the past four decades-from the direct action of the 1960s and 1970s to the backlash against feminism in the 1980s and 1990s. Drawing on organizational documents and interviews with both veterans of the women''s movement and younger feminists in Columbus, Ohio, Nancy Whittier traces the changing definitions of feminism as the movement has evolved. She documents subtle variations in feminist identity and analyzes the striking differences, conflicts, and cooperation between longtime and recent activists.The collective stories of the women-many of them lesbians and lesbian feminists whom the author shows to be central to the women''s movement and radical feminism-illustrate that contemporary radical feminism is very much alive. It is sustained through protests, direct action, feminist bookstores, rape crisis centers, and cultural activities like music festivals and writers workshops, which Whittier argues are integral-and political-aspects of the movement''s survival.Her analysis includes discussions of a variety of both liberal and radical organizations, including the Women''s Action Collective, Women Against Rape, Fan the Flames Bookstore, the Ohio ERA Task Force, and NOW. Unlike many studies of feminist organizing, her study also considers the difference between Columbus, a Midwest, medium-sized city, and feminist activities in major cities like New York, San Francisco, and Chicago, as well as the roles of radical feminists in the development of women''s studies departments and other social movements like AIDS education and self-help.In the series Women in the Political Economy, edited by Ronnie J. Steinberg. 
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HQ1154 | HQ1154 .W49 1995 | HQ1154.W49 | HQ1154.W49 1995 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=557362 Available EBL557362

Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1: Radical Feminism in Columbus, Ohio; 2: The Evolution of Radical Feminist Identity; 3: Changers and the Changed: Radical Feminists in the Reagan Years; 4: Keeping the Faith: Working for Social Change; 5: United We Stand: The Impact of the Women''s Movement on Other Social Movements; 6: Feminists in the "Postfeminist" Age: The Women''s Movement in the I980s; 7: The Next Wave; Conclusion: The Persistence and Transformation of Social Movements; Appendix: Women''s Movement Organizations and Dates, Columbus, Ohio; Notes; Index

The radical feminist movement has undergone significant transformation over the past four decades-from the direct action of the 1960s and 1970s to the backlash against feminism in the 1980s and 1990s. Drawing on organizational documents and interviews with both veterans of the women''s movement and younger feminists in Columbus, Ohio, Nancy Whittier traces the changing definitions of feminism as the movement has evolved. She documents subtle variations in feminist identity and analyzes the striking differences, conflicts, and cooperation between longtime and recent activists.The collective stories of the women-many of them lesbians and lesbian feminists whom the author shows to be central to the women''s movement and radical feminism-illustrate that contemporary radical feminism is very much alive. It is sustained through protests, direct action, feminist bookstores, rape crisis centers, and cultural activities like music festivals and writers workshops, which Whittier argues are integral-and political-aspects of the movement''s survival.Her analysis includes discussions of a variety of both liberal and radical organizations, including the Women''s Action Collective, Women Against Rape, Fan the Flames Bookstore, the Ohio ERA Task Force, and NOW. Unlike many studies of feminist organizing, her study also considers the difference between Columbus, a Midwest, medium-sized city, and feminist activities in major cities like New York, San Francisco, and Chicago, as well as the roles of radical feminists in the development of women''s studies departments and other social movements like AIDS education and self-help.In the series Women in the Political Economy, edited by Ronnie J. Steinberg. 

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Like many other university communities in the late 1960s and early '70s, Columbus, Ohio, was a hotbed of political and cultural activism. A resurgent women's movement--especially its radical feminist element--flourished in that environment. Whittier located and talked with 34 women who were the "core" of the radical feminist community in Columbus. Her informants' descriptions of their work in the movement, accounts of organizational success and failure, portraits of other activists, and recollections of debates, fights, and splits provide the basis of her reconstruction of their collective history. Whittier argues that these self-portraits reveal key differences in the collective identities and aims of women who entered the movement at different times. Using the "generational perspectives" of successive cohorts of activists, she theorizes about transformation and persistence in insurgent ideology and the continuation of social movements even through periods when activism and resources decline. The analysis of intracohort tensions is particularly interesting because almost two-thirds of her informants are lesbians. This intelligent and well-written book is highly recommended for its significant contribution to women's studies and social movements. All levels.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Nancy Whittier is Assistant Professor of Sociology at Smith College.<br>

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