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Living the Revolution : Italian Women''s Resistance and Radicalism in New York City, 1880-1945

By: Guglielmo, Jennifer.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, 2010Description: 1 online resource (417 p.).ISBN: 9780807898222.Subject(s): Italian American women -- Political activity -- New York (State) -- New York -- History | Italians -- Political activity -- New York (State) -- New York --History | Radicalism -- New York (State) -- New York -- History | Women immigrants -- Political activity -- New York (State) -- New York -- History | Women in the labor movement -- New York (State) -- New York -- History | Working class women -- Political activity -- New York (State) -- New York -- HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Living the Revolution : Italian Women''s Resistance and Radicalism in New York City, 1880-1945DDC classification: 320.53082/097471 | 320.53082097471 LOC classification: HQ1439.N6 G84 2010Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Introduction; 1 Women's Cultures of Resistance in Southern Italy; 2 La Sartina (The Seamstress) Becomes a Transnational Labor Migrant; 3 The Racialization of Southern Italian Women; 4 Surviving the Shock of Arrival and Everyday Resistance; 5 Anarchist Feminists and the Radical Subculture; 6 The 1909-1919 Strike Wave and the Birth of Industrial Unionism; 7 Red Scare, the Lure of Fascism, and Diasporic Resistance; 8 Community Organizing in a Racial Hall of Mirrors; Conclusions; Notes; Bibliography; Acknowledgments; Index
Summary: Italians were the largest group of immigrants to the United States at the turn of the twentieth century, and hundreds of thousands led and participated in some of the period''s most volatile labor strikes. Yet until now, Italian women''s political activism and cultures of resistance have been largely invisible. In Living the Revolution, Jennifer Guglielmo brings to life the Italian working-class women who helped shape the vibrant, transnational, radical political culture that expanded into the emerging industrial union movement. Guglielmo imaginatively documents the activism of two generations of New York and New Jersey women who worked in the needle and textile trades. She explores the complex and distinctive ways immigrant women and their American-born daughters drew on Italian traditions of protest to form new urban female networks of everyday resistance and political activism. And she shows how their commitment to revolutionary and transnational social movements diminished as they became white working-class Americans. The rise of fascism, the Red Scare, and the deprivations of the Great Depression led many to embrace nationalism and racism, ironically to try to meet the same desires for economic justice and dignity that had inspired their enthusiasm for anarchism, socialism, and communism.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HQ1439.N6 G84 2010 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=565692 Available EBL565692

Contents; Introduction; 1 Women's Cultures of Resistance in Southern Italy; 2 La Sartina (The Seamstress) Becomes a Transnational Labor Migrant; 3 The Racialization of Southern Italian Women; 4 Surviving the Shock of Arrival and Everyday Resistance; 5 Anarchist Feminists and the Radical Subculture; 6 The 1909-1919 Strike Wave and the Birth of Industrial Unionism; 7 Red Scare, the Lure of Fascism, and Diasporic Resistance; 8 Community Organizing in a Racial Hall of Mirrors; Conclusions; Notes; Bibliography; Acknowledgments; Index

Italians were the largest group of immigrants to the United States at the turn of the twentieth century, and hundreds of thousands led and participated in some of the period''s most volatile labor strikes. Yet until now, Italian women''s political activism and cultures of resistance have been largely invisible. In Living the Revolution, Jennifer Guglielmo brings to life the Italian working-class women who helped shape the vibrant, transnational, radical political culture that expanded into the emerging industrial union movement. Guglielmo imaginatively documents the activism of two generations of New York and New Jersey women who worked in the needle and textile trades. She explores the complex and distinctive ways immigrant women and their American-born daughters drew on Italian traditions of protest to form new urban female networks of everyday resistance and political activism. And she shows how their commitment to revolutionary and transnational social movements diminished as they became white working-class Americans. The rise of fascism, the Red Scare, and the deprivations of the Great Depression led many to embrace nationalism and racism, ironically to try to meet the same desires for economic justice and dignity that had inspired their enthusiasm for anarchism, socialism, and communism.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Behind this brilliantly researched book is a belief in "the transformative power of a good story"--a special gift in a historian. Guglielmo's daunting research takes Italian American women back three generations through their Lower Manhattan/Northern New Jersey/East Harlem foremothers. The author reassembles a scattered record of inspiring, often visionary, workplace and community struggles--from anarchism to union activism to community organizing--into a kind of epic of passionate claims on social justice and equality joined across ethnic and racial lines. But her powerful narrative (which extends previous work on the Italian American project of "whiteness") turns tragic as it reveals through the voices of those who experienced them the forces that, combined with the wider US pressure to assimilate, subdued or repressed each insurgency: the criminalizing of anarchism, the co-optation of the union movement, the rise of fascism, the destruction of mixed-race working-class communities by urban renewal. Guglielmo understands what Italian Americans thought they gained in this process, but she also illuminates and animates what they lost, particularly as women. Or almost lost. Readers sense that in the context of the history we make as well as inherit, regret can be transformative too. Beautifully edited, sourced, and indexed. An extraordinary book. Summing Up: Essential. All levels/libraries. F. Alaya emerita, Ramapo College of New Jersey

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