Black Women in New South Literature and Culture.

By: Johnson, Sherita LMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandStudies in American Popular History and Culture: Publisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2010Edition: 1Description: 1 online resource (173 p.)ISBN: 9780203867853Subject(s): African American women in literature | African American women in literature | American literature - Southern States - History and criticism | American literature -- Southern States -- History and criticism | American literature -- Southern StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Black Women in New South Literature and CultureDDC classification: 810.9/3522 | 810.99287 LOC classification: PS261 .J55 2009Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Book Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 'In the Sunny South': Reconstructing Frances Harper as Southern; 2 Conjuring a New South: Black Women Radicals in the Works of Charles Chesnutt and George Washington Cable; 3 New South, New Negro: Anna Julia Cooper's A Voice from the South; 4 'The South Is Our Home': Cultural Narratives of Place and Displacement; Epilogue: Voices, Bodies, and Texts: Making the Black Woman Visible in New South Literature and Culture; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: This book focuses on the profound impact that racism had on the literary imagination of black Americans in the South. Sherita L. Johnson argues that it is impossible to consider what the "South" and what "southernness" mean without looking at how black women have contributed to and contested any unified definition of that region.
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Book Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; 1 'In the Sunny South': Reconstructing Frances Harper as Southern; 2 Conjuring a New South: Black Women Radicals in the Works of Charles Chesnutt and George Washington Cable; 3 New South, New Negro: Anna Julia Cooper's A Voice from the South; 4 'The South Is Our Home': Cultural Narratives of Place and Displacement; Epilogue: Voices, Bodies, and Texts: Making the Black Woman Visible in New South Literature and Culture; Notes; Bibliography; Index

This book focuses on the profound impact that racism had on the literary imagination of black Americans in the South. Sherita L. Johnson argues that it is impossible to consider what the "South" and what "southernness" mean without looking at how black women have contributed to and contested any unified definition of that region.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Johnson (Univ. of Southern Mississippi) studies black women as "under-acknowledged agents of cultural change" in nonfiction and fiction by Frances Harper, Charles Chesnutt, George Washington Cable, and Anna Julia Cooper. These Progressive Era authors, including the Caucasian Cable, "challenge an oppressive regime and transform Southern cultural standards" by "deconstructing" the traditional image of the southern lady as a white woman, writes Johnson. Black women are on "the margins" of narratives by Cable and Chesnutt, but these characters do embody "disruptive 'trickster energy'" in "satirical racial dramas of the Jim Crow South." Although she emphasizes the importance of archival collections to her research, most of the texts Johnson discusses--such as Chesnutt's conjure woman stories, Cable's The Grandissimes (1880), and Cooper's A Voice from the South (1892)--are readily available in reprint editions. Her most original contribution is a short chapter on brief autobiographical pieces in which white and black women reflect on the "Negro problem" for The Independent magazine in a series that ran from 1901 to 1904. The book is marred by a sketchy index, weak editing, and dozens of proofreading errors. Summing Up: Optional. Extensive collections serving readers at all levels. J. W. Hall University of Mississippi

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Sherita L. Johnson is an Assistant Professor of English at the University of Southern Mississippi. She has published several encyclopedia articles about African American literature and culture. She served as a guest editor for a special issue of The Southern Quarterly, "'My Southern Home': The Life and Literature of 19th Century Southern Black Writers."

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