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Power, Voice and Subjectivity in Literature for Young Readers.

By: Nikolajeva, Maria.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Children''s Literature and Culture: Publisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2009Edition: 1.Description: 1 online resource (232 p.).ISBN: 9780203866924.Subject(s): Children''s literature - History and criticism - Theory, etc | Children''s literature -- History and criticism -- Theory, etc | Children''s literature - Psychological aspects | Children''s literature -- Psychological aspects | Children''''s literature | Other (Philosophy) in literature | Other (Philosophy) in literature | Power (Philosophy) in literature | Power (Philosophy) in literature | Subjectivity in literature | Subjectivity in literature | Voice in literature | Voice in literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Power, Voice and Subjectivity in Literature for Young ReadersDDC classification: 809.89282 LOC classification: PN1009.A1 N565 2009Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Book Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; Series Editor's Foreword; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Why Does Pippi Sleep with Her Feet on the Pillow?; Chapter One Harry Potter and the Secrets of Children's Literature; Chapter Two Othering the Sense: Language and (Mis)communication; Chapter Three Othering the Genre: Fantasy and Realism; Chapter Four Othering the Child: George MacDonald's Fairy Tales; Chapter Five Othering the Future: Stereotypes of Dystopia; Chapter Six Othering the Setting: Orientalism and Robinsonnade; Chapter Seven Othering Gender: New Masculinities, New Femininities
Chapter Eight Othering the Voice: Crossvocalization and PerformanceChapter Nine Othering Ideology: Literature in Society's Service; Chapter Ten Othering the Species: The (Ab)use of Animals; Chapter Eleven Othering the Visual: Power Structures in Picturebooks; Chapter Twelve Othering the Reader: Identification Fallacy; Conclusion The Adult's Self-Denial; Bibliography; Index
Summary: Looking at key works from the eighteenth-century to the present, Nikolajeva explores topics such as genre, gender, crossvocalization, species, and picturebook images in order to demonstrate how a balance is maintained between the two opposite inherent goals of children's literature: to empower and to educate the child.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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PN1009.A1 N565 2009 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=446894 Available EBL446894

Book Cover; Title; Copyright; Contents; Series Editor's Foreword; Acknowledgments; Introduction: Why Does Pippi Sleep with Her Feet on the Pillow?; Chapter One Harry Potter and the Secrets of Children's Literature; Chapter Two Othering the Sense: Language and (Mis)communication; Chapter Three Othering the Genre: Fantasy and Realism; Chapter Four Othering the Child: George MacDonald's Fairy Tales; Chapter Five Othering the Future: Stereotypes of Dystopia; Chapter Six Othering the Setting: Orientalism and Robinsonnade; Chapter Seven Othering Gender: New Masculinities, New Femininities

Chapter Eight Othering the Voice: Crossvocalization and PerformanceChapter Nine Othering Ideology: Literature in Society's Service; Chapter Ten Othering the Species: The (Ab)use of Animals; Chapter Eleven Othering the Visual: Power Structures in Picturebooks; Chapter Twelve Othering the Reader: Identification Fallacy; Conclusion The Adult's Self-Denial; Bibliography; Index

Looking at key works from the eighteenth-century to the present, Nikolajeva explores topics such as genre, gender, crossvocalization, species, and picturebook images in order to demonstrate how a balance is maintained between the two opposite inherent goals of children's literature: to empower and to educate the child.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Reconfiguring the concept of normativity from queer theory and combining it with Mikhail Bakhtin's notion of carnival, Nikolajeva (Cambridge Univ., UK) attempts to develop a functional theory of children's literature. In 12 chapters stitched together from speeches and papers, she explores power relationships, especially between the implied author and the subject position of the implied reader. Her analysis depends on the term "heterology," indicating "imbalance, inequality, asymmetry between children and adults," and the ungainly coinage "aetonormativity," indicating acceptance of adult values as the norm. Discussing a variety of genres, from fantasy to picture books, Nikolajeva shows how books provide child characters with temporary freedom and power (a period of carnival), yet terminate this subversion with oppression by restoring adult rules and power (aetonormativity). The early chapters on Harry Potter, Alice, and Winnie the Pooh follow well-worn paths, but later chapters, especially those on ideology and the fallacy of reader identification, are fresh and stimulating. Nikolajeva's discussions of how narratives engage in "othering" children are marred by substantive typos and some awkwardness of expression. Nevertheless, this is a significant, provocative study of children's textual "oppression." Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. R. E. Jones University of Alberta

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Maria Nikolajeva is a Professor of Education at the University of Cambridge, UK. She is the recipient of the international Grimm Award for lifetime achievements in children's literature research.</p>

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