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Women, Production, and Patriarchy in Late Medieval Cities.

By: Howell, Martha C.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Women in Culture and Society: Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2009Description: 1 online resource (303 p.).ISBN: 9780226355061.Subject(s): Employment | Europe, Northern | History | Middle Ages, 500-1500 | Women | WomenGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Women, Production, and Patriarchy in Late Medieval CitiesDDC classification: 331.4/094 | 331.4094 LOC classification: HD6134HD6134.H69HD6134.H69 1986Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Foreword; Preface; Introduction; Part 1: Women''s Work in Medieval Cities of Northern Europe; 1. A Framework for Understanding Women''s Work; 2. The Sex-Gender System and Economic Systems; Part 2: Empirical Studies: Leiden and Cologne; 3. The Socioeconomic Structure of Leiden; 4. Women''s Work in Leiden''s Market Production; 5. The Socioeconomic Structure of Cologne; 6. Women''s Work in Cologne''s Market Production; Part 3: Points of Intersection; 7. The Comparative Perspective: Lier, Douai, Frankfurt am Main; 8. Women''s Work and Social Change; Appendixes
1. Income from Leiden''s Strikerye2. Archival Sources for Leiden; 3. Population fo Leiden in 1498; Notes; Works Cited; Index
Summary: In this bold reinterpretation of Women''s changing labor status during the late medieval and early modern period, Martha C. Howell argues that women''s work was the product of the intersection of two systems, one cultural and one economic. Howell shows forcefully that patriarchal family structure, not capitalist development per se, was a decisive factor in determining women''s work. Women could enjoy high labor status if they worked within a family production unit or if their labor did not interfere with their domestic responsibilities or threaten male control of a craft or trade.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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HD6134 | HD6134.H69 | HD6134.H69 1986 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=448555 Available EBL448555

Contents; Foreword; Preface; Introduction; Part 1: Women''s Work in Medieval Cities of Northern Europe; 1. A Framework for Understanding Women''s Work; 2. The Sex-Gender System and Economic Systems; Part 2: Empirical Studies: Leiden and Cologne; 3. The Socioeconomic Structure of Leiden; 4. Women''s Work in Leiden''s Market Production; 5. The Socioeconomic Structure of Cologne; 6. Women''s Work in Cologne''s Market Production; Part 3: Points of Intersection; 7. The Comparative Perspective: Lier, Douai, Frankfurt am Main; 8. Women''s Work and Social Change; Appendixes

1. Income from Leiden''s Strikerye2. Archival Sources for Leiden; 3. Population fo Leiden in 1498; Notes; Works Cited; Index

In this bold reinterpretation of Women''s changing labor status during the late medieval and early modern period, Martha C. Howell argues that women''s work was the product of the intersection of two systems, one cultural and one economic. Howell shows forcefully that patriarchal family structure, not capitalist development per se, was a decisive factor in determining women''s work. Women could enjoy high labor status if they worked within a family production unit or if their labor did not interfere with their domestic responsibilities or threaten male control of a craft or trade.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

This important study explores the relationship between changing economic processes and gender roles in the 15th and early 16th centuries. The focus is on the heavy cloth industry in Leiden and the silk, textile, and wine trades in Cologne; and comparisons are made with women workers in Douai and Frankfurt am Main. Howell shows that women gained high-status positions in Leiden and Cologne because the family economy was directly involved in market production, and women lost those positions when political and business pressures forced economies to shift from the family production unit to individual production. A sound and thoroughly researched study primarily for academic and research libraries. Bennett D. Hill, St. Anselm's Abbey, Washington, D.C. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Howell argues in this important book that 15th- and 16th-century women, especially married and widowed, gained high-status labor positions (i.e., independent control over raw materials, supplies, and distribution) in urban market production as their activities grew out of the family or household unit of production. Howell derives evidence in support of her thesis primarily from Leiden and Cologne. Changing economic conditions, e.g., the growth of small commodity production in Leiden, and capitalism in Cologne, led to changes in the family production unit. When the political system, based upon the patriarchal structure of society, was threatened by women's economic power, women were systematically excluded from high-status economic activities. Howell concludes that women lost high-status work because the patriarchal order demanded it. High status was associated with both political and economic power, and women were excluded from the former. For these and other reasons, upper- and middle-class women who formerly held high-status jobs did not leave the family. Indirect though her evidence may be, Howell's arguments are persuasive and they provide a needed corrective to more simplistic Marxist assumptions of the determinative role of capitalism in changing women's status. One might quibble with her conclusions concerning the Northern European model of the family, where scholarly consensus has not been reached. Nevertheless, the book is highly recommended for upper-division undergraduate students and above.- C.W. Clark, St. Andrews Presbyterian College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Martha C. Howell is professor of history and director of the Institute for Research on Women and Gender at Columbia University.

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