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Live Wire : Women and Brotherhood in the Electrical Industry

By: Moccio, Fran.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Philadelphia : Temple University Press, 2009Description: 1 online resource (285 p.).ISBN: 9781592137398.Subject(s): Building trades -- Employees -- Labor unions -- United States | Building trades - Employees - Labor unions - United States | Electric industry workers -- Labor unions -- United States | Electric industry workers - Labor unions - United States | International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers | International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers. Local no. 3 (New York, N.Y.) | Sex discrimination against women - United States | Sex discrimination against women -- United StatesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Live Wire : Women and Brotherhood in the Electrical IndustryDDC classification: 331.4 | 331.4/862130973 | 331.8812139124082 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Introduction: Getting Wired; Acknowledgments; 1. Brotherhood: The History; 2. A Closer Look at Local 3; 3. The Struggle to Become Electricians; 4. On the Electrical Construction Work Site: The Sexual Charge; 5. Race for the Brotherhood: The Ironies of Integration; 6. A Club of Her Own; Conclusion: Getting Women Down to the Job Site; Appendix A; Appendix B; Appendix C; Appendix D; Notes; Selected References; Glossary; Index
Summary: In Live Wire, Francine Moccio brings to life forty years of public policy reform and advocacy that have failed to eliminate restricted opportunities for women in highly paid, skilled blue-collar jobs. Breaking barriers into a male-only occupation and trade, women electricians have found career opportunities in nontraditional work. Yet their efforts to achieve gender equality have also collided with the prejudice and fraternal values of brotherhood and factors that have ultimately derailed women''s full inclusion.By drawing instructive comparisons of women's entrance into the electricians' trade and its union with those of black and other minority men, Moccio's in-depth case study brings new insights into the ways in which divisions at work along the lines of race, gender, and economic background enhance and/or inhibit inclusion. Incorporating research based on extensive primary, secondary, and archival resources, Live Wire contributes a much-needed examination of how sex segregation is reproduced in blue-collar occupations, while also scrutinizing the complex interactions of work, unions, leisure, and family life.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HD6515 | HD6515.E32I58 2009 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=449827 Available EBL449827

Contents; Introduction: Getting Wired; Acknowledgments; 1. Brotherhood: The History; 2. A Closer Look at Local 3; 3. The Struggle to Become Electricians; 4. On the Electrical Construction Work Site: The Sexual Charge; 5. Race for the Brotherhood: The Ironies of Integration; 6. A Club of Her Own; Conclusion: Getting Women Down to the Job Site; Appendix A; Appendix B; Appendix C; Appendix D; Notes; Selected References; Glossary; Index

In Live Wire, Francine Moccio brings to life forty years of public policy reform and advocacy that have failed to eliminate restricted opportunities for women in highly paid, skilled blue-collar jobs. Breaking barriers into a male-only occupation and trade, women electricians have found career opportunities in nontraditional work. Yet their efforts to achieve gender equality have also collided with the prejudice and fraternal values of brotherhood and factors that have ultimately derailed women''s full inclusion.By drawing instructive comparisons of women's entrance into the electricians' trade and its union with those of black and other minority men, Moccio's in-depth case study brings new insights into the ways in which divisions at work along the lines of race, gender, and economic background enhance and/or inhibit inclusion. Incorporating research based on extensive primary, secondary, and archival resources, Live Wire contributes a much-needed examination of how sex segregation is reproduced in blue-collar occupations, while also scrutinizing the complex interactions of work, unions, leisure, and family life.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Moccio (Cornell Univ.) examines why there are so few women electricians, and why their male coworkers harass and haze those women in the trade. Women represent only 2 percent of the building trades after 30 years of trying to increase their representation. This volume provides an in-depth view of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers and the Electrical Contractors' Association. The union is divided into locals, based on location, and then into divisions, based on specific occupations or trades. Divisions have social clubs organized by gender, ethnic, or religious lines. For her study, Moccio interviewed women workers in Local 3, based in New York City. She describes entry into the union and apprentice programs, and reports on how women are treated differently and worse than men. For example, a woman absent from work would be fired while a man in the same circumstances would be warned, and women are given more dangerous jobs than men, e.g., jobs on skyscraper construction. Moccio examines reasons for this unequal treatment and how the male work culture and patriarchal and paternalistic attitudes continue to hinder women's inclusion in skilled trade occupations. Summing Up: Highly recommended. General readers, all levels of undergraduate and graduate students, faculty, professionals. E. P. Hoffman emeritus, Western Michigan University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Francine A. Moccio is Director of the Institute for Women and Work, ILR School at Cornell University.</p>

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