Normal view MARC view ISBD view

The Qualities of a Citizen : Women, Immigration, and Citizenship, 1870-1965

By: Gardner, Martha.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2009Description: 1 online resource (279 p.).ISBN: 9781400826575.Subject(s): Citizenship -- United States -- History | Emigration and immigration law -- United States -- History | Social role -- United States -- History | United States -- Emigration and immigration -- Government policy -- History | Women immigrants -- Government policy -- United States -- HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Qualities of a Citizen : Women, Immigration, and Citizenship, 1870-1965DDC classification: 305.420973 | 325.73 | 325.73/082 LOC classification: JV6602 .G37 2009Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; In the Shadow of the Law; PART I: Wives, Mothers, and Maids; PART II: Citizens, Residents, and Non-Americans; PART III: Marriage, Family, and the Law; Conclusion: Regulating Belonging; A Brief Guide to Archival Sources; Acknowledgments; Index
Summary: The Qualities of a Citizen traces the application of U.S. immigration and naturalization law to women from the 1870s to the late 1960s. Like no other book before, it explores how racialized, gendered, and historical anxieties shaped our current understandings of the histories of immigrant women. The book takes us from the first federal immigration restrictions against Asian prostitutes in the 1870s to the immigration "reform" measures of the late 1960s. Throughout this period, topics such as morality, family, marriage, poverty, and nationality structured historical debates over women''s immigration and citizenship. At the border, women immigrants, immigration officials, social service providers, and federal judges argued the grounds on which women would be included within the nation. As interview transcripts and court documents reveal, when, where, and how women were welcomed into the country depended on their racial status, their roles in the family, and their work skills. Gender and race mattered. The book emphasizes the comparative nature of racial ideologies in which the inclusion of one group often came with the exclusion of another. It explores how U.S. officials insisted on the link between race and gender in understanding America''s peculiar brand of nationalism. It also serves as a social history of the law, detailing women''s experiences and strategies, successes and failures, to belong to the nation.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
JV6602 .G37 2009 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=457801 Available EBL457801

Contents; In the Shadow of the Law; PART I: Wives, Mothers, and Maids; PART II: Citizens, Residents, and Non-Americans; PART III: Marriage, Family, and the Law; Conclusion: Regulating Belonging; A Brief Guide to Archival Sources; Acknowledgments; Index

The Qualities of a Citizen traces the application of U.S. immigration and naturalization law to women from the 1870s to the late 1960s. Like no other book before, it explores how racialized, gendered, and historical anxieties shaped our current understandings of the histories of immigrant women. The book takes us from the first federal immigration restrictions against Asian prostitutes in the 1870s to the immigration "reform" measures of the late 1960s. Throughout this period, topics such as morality, family, marriage, poverty, and nationality structured historical debates over women''s immigration and citizenship. At the border, women immigrants, immigration officials, social service providers, and federal judges argued the grounds on which women would be included within the nation. As interview transcripts and court documents reveal, when, where, and how women were welcomed into the country depended on their racial status, their roles in the family, and their work skills. Gender and race mattered. The book emphasizes the comparative nature of racial ideologies in which the inclusion of one group often came with the exclusion of another. It explores how U.S. officials insisted on the link between race and gender in understanding America''s peculiar brand of nationalism. It also serves as a social history of the law, detailing women''s experiences and strategies, successes and failures, to belong to the nation.

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Martha Gardner is Assistant Professor of History at DePaul University.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.