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Hard Choices : How Women Decide About Work, Career and Motherhood

By: Gerson, Kathleen.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.California Series on Social Choice and Political Economy: Publisher: Berkeley : University of California Press, 1986Description: 1 online resource (333 p.).ISBN: 9780520908130.Subject(s): Family size - United States - History | Family size -- United States -- History | Mothers - Employment - United States - History | Mothers -- Employment -- United States -- History | Mothers - United States - Social conditions | Mothers -- United States -- Social conditions | Women - Employment - United States - History | Women -- Employment -- United States -- History | Women - United States - Psychology | Women -- United States -- Psychology | Women - United States - Social conditions | Women -- United States -- Social conditionsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Hard Choices : How Women Decide About Work, Career and MotherhoodDDC classification: 305.4 LOC classification: HQ1420 .G47 1986HQ1420.G4Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; List of Figures; List of Tables; Preface; Acknowledgments; 1 Women''s Work and Family Decisions: The "Subtle Revolution" in Historical Perspective; Changing Work and Family Patterns; Cohorts and Social Change; Alternative Paths in Adult Development; 2 Explaining Women''s Behavior: A Theoretical Overview; The Structural Coercion Approach; The Voluntarist Approach; A Developmental Approach; 3 Baselines; Childhood Socialization; Starting Points; Ambivalence and Change; 4 Veering Away from Domesticity; Rising Work Aspirations and Family Ambivalence; Conclusion
5 Veering Toward DomesticityDeclining Work Aspirations and the Home as a Haven; Comparing Domestic and Nondomestic Groups; Stability and Change in Adulthood; Conclusion; 6 Homemaking Versus Childlessness; The Persistence of Domestic Patterns; Nondomestic Responses; Choosing to Stay Childless; 7 Combining Work and Motherhood; Reluctant Motherhood; Childlessness Versus Reluctant Motherhood; Domestic Versus Nondomestic Responses; 8 The Changing Contours of Women''s Place; Development, Choice, and Structured Alternatives; The Limits of Socialization, Personality, and Dominance Models
Work and Family Structures in TransitionConclusion; 9 The Politics of Parenthood; The Limits of Change and the Conflict Among Women; Gender Equality, Social Policy, and the Role of the State; Appendix A: Tables; Appendix B: Methodology; Appendix C: Sample Characteristics; Appendix D: Interview Schedule; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z
Summary: How do women choose between work and family commitments? And what are the causes, limits, and consequences of the "subtle revolution" in women''s choices over the 1960s and 1970s? To answer these questions, Kathleen Gerson analyzes the experiences of a carefully selected group of middle-class and working-class women who were young adults in the 1970s. Their informative life histories reveal the emerging social forces in American society that have led today''s women to face several difficult choices.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HQ1420 .G47 1986 | HQ1420.G4 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=470841 Available EBL470841

Contents; List of Figures; List of Tables; Preface; Acknowledgments; 1 Women''s Work and Family Decisions: The "Subtle Revolution" in Historical Perspective; Changing Work and Family Patterns; Cohorts and Social Change; Alternative Paths in Adult Development; 2 Explaining Women''s Behavior: A Theoretical Overview; The Structural Coercion Approach; The Voluntarist Approach; A Developmental Approach; 3 Baselines; Childhood Socialization; Starting Points; Ambivalence and Change; 4 Veering Away from Domesticity; Rising Work Aspirations and Family Ambivalence; Conclusion

5 Veering Toward DomesticityDeclining Work Aspirations and the Home as a Haven; Comparing Domestic and Nondomestic Groups; Stability and Change in Adulthood; Conclusion; 6 Homemaking Versus Childlessness; The Persistence of Domestic Patterns; Nondomestic Responses; Choosing to Stay Childless; 7 Combining Work and Motherhood; Reluctant Motherhood; Childlessness Versus Reluctant Motherhood; Domestic Versus Nondomestic Responses; 8 The Changing Contours of Women''s Place; Development, Choice, and Structured Alternatives; The Limits of Socialization, Personality, and Dominance Models

Work and Family Structures in TransitionConclusion; 9 The Politics of Parenthood; The Limits of Change and the Conflict Among Women; Gender Equality, Social Policy, and the Role of the State; Appendix A: Tables; Appendix B: Methodology; Appendix C: Sample Characteristics; Appendix D: Interview Schedule; Bibliography; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z

How do women choose between work and family commitments? And what are the causes, limits, and consequences of the "subtle revolution" in women''s choices over the 1960s and 1970s? To answer these questions, Kathleen Gerson analyzes the experiences of a carefully selected group of middle-class and working-class women who were young adults in the 1970s. Their informative life histories reveal the emerging social forces in American society that have led today''s women to face several difficult choices.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Gerson reports on her doctoral study (1978-79) in which 72 white women between the ages of 27 and 37 were interviewed concerning family and work decisions. The women chosen for the study were randomly selected from two sources: lists of recent enrollees at a community college in a working-class community and lists of alumnae of a large four-year university in the San Francisco Bay Area. The study attempts to trace the process behind three major choices facing American women: 1) marriage, motherhood, and homemaking; 2) work, career, and childlessness; and 3) work, career, and motherhood. The study predicts that in the future there will be an increasing preference for childlessness or one child, coupled with a high degree of employment commitment among women. The author claims that women who combine work and motherhood represent a ``silent revolution'' in our society. She concludes with policy recommendations that she believes will enhance women's lives. Gerson's findings are presented in tables and excerpts from tape-recorded interviews. The book contains appendixes of demographic tables, methodological rationale, sample characteristics, and interview schedules. Although the subject matter is of great interest and importance, the appeal of this book is diminished somewhat by the repetitive and ponderous style in which it is written. Graduate level.-S. Reinharz, Brandeis University

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