Louisiana Culture from the Colonial Era to Katrina.

By: Lowe, JohnMaterial type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on DemandSouthern Literary Studies: Publisher: Baton Rouge : LSU Press, 2008Edition: 1Description: 1 online resource (340 p.)ISBN: 9780807134856Subject(s): American literature - Louisiana - History and criticism | American literature --Louisiana --History and criticism | Louisiana - Civilization | Louisiana - Ethnic relations | Louisiana - Intellectual life | Louisiana - Social life and customs | Louisiana --Civilization | Louisiana --Ethnic relations | Louisiana --Intellectual life | Louisiana --Social life and customsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Louisiana Culture from the Colonial Era to KatrinaDDC classification: 305.8009763 LOC classification: F369.L884 2008Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; INTRODUCTION: Creole Cultures and National Identity after Katrina; PART 1 INDIAN, FRENCH, SPANISH, AFRICAN, GERMAN: THE EARLY ORIGINS OF A UNIQUE CULTURE; The Beginnings of Louisiana Literature: The French Domination of 1682-1763; Louisiana-the New Egypt: Charles Sealsfield's Report from the 1820s; Slavery in French Louisiana: From Gallic Colony to American Territory; PART 2 THE CREOLE CONTROVERSY; Creole Cultures and the Process of Creolization: With Special Attention to Louisiana; One-Drop Rules: Self-Identity and the Women in the Trial of Toucoutou
PART 3 LOUISIANA LITERATURE: THE TRADITION AND THREE CONTEMPORARY WRITERSLouisiana and the American Literary Tradition; The Carnival Voices of A Confederacy of Dunces; Ellen Gilchrist's False Eden: The New Orleans Stories of In the Land of Dreamy Dreams; Intimacy and/in Distance: The Poetry of Pinkie Gordon Lane; PART 4 LOUISIANA MYTHOLOGIES, FROM THE KINGFISH TO THE PECULIAR FASCINATION WITH THE DEAD; The Kingfish as Trickster Hero: Huey Long in Louisiana Culture; I Want to Die in New Orleans; PART 5 MUSIC THAT SOOTHES THE SOUL
Hollers, Blue Notes, and Brass Sounds: Diverse Musical and Cultural Influences on Jazz in LouisianaOne More Last Chance: Ritual and the Jazz Funeral; CONCLUSION: Hearing Sappho in New Orleans; Contributors; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z
Summary: In 1803, President Thomas Jefferson acquired 828,000 square miles of French territory in what became known as the Louisiana Purchase. Although today Louisiana makes up only a small portion of this immense territory, this exceptional state embraces a larger-than-life history and a cultural blend unlike any other in the nation. Louisiana Culture from the Colonial Era to Katrina, a collection of fourteen essays compiled and edited by John Lowe, captures all of the flavor and richness of the state''s heritage, illuminating how Louisiana, despite its differences from the rest of the United States, is a microcosm of key national concerns -- including regionalism, race, politics, immigration, global connections, folklore, musical traditions, ethnicity, and hybridity. Divided into five parts, the volume opens with an examination of Louisiana''s origins, with pieces on Native Americans, French and German explorers, and slavery. Two very different but complementary essays follow with investigations into the ongoing attempts to define Creoles and creolization. No collection on Louisiana would be complete without attention to its remarkable literary traditions, and several contributors offer tantalizing readings of some of the Pelican State''s most distinguished writers -- a dazzling array of artists any state would be proud to claim. The volume also includes pieces on a couple of eccentric mythologies distinct to Louisiana and explorations of Louisiana''s unique musical heritage.Throughout, the international slate of contributors explores the idea of place, particularly the concept of Louisiana as the center of the Caribbean wheel, where Cajuns, Creoles, Cubans, Haitians, Jamaicans, and others are part of a New World configuration, connected by their linguistic identity, landscape and climate, religion, and French and Spanish heritage. A poignant conclusion considers the devastating impact of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita and what the storms mean for Louisiana''s cultural future. A rich portrait of Louisiana culture, this volume stands as a reminder of why that culture must be preserved.
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F369.L884 2008 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=483267 Available EBL483267

Cover; Contents; ACKNOWLEDGMENTS; INTRODUCTION: Creole Cultures and National Identity after Katrina; PART 1 INDIAN, FRENCH, SPANISH, AFRICAN, GERMAN: THE EARLY ORIGINS OF A UNIQUE CULTURE; The Beginnings of Louisiana Literature: The French Domination of 1682-1763; Louisiana-the New Egypt: Charles Sealsfield's Report from the 1820s; Slavery in French Louisiana: From Gallic Colony to American Territory; PART 2 THE CREOLE CONTROVERSY; Creole Cultures and the Process of Creolization: With Special Attention to Louisiana; One-Drop Rules: Self-Identity and the Women in the Trial of Toucoutou

PART 3 LOUISIANA LITERATURE: THE TRADITION AND THREE CONTEMPORARY WRITERSLouisiana and the American Literary Tradition; The Carnival Voices of A Confederacy of Dunces; Ellen Gilchrist's False Eden: The New Orleans Stories of In the Land of Dreamy Dreams; Intimacy and/in Distance: The Poetry of Pinkie Gordon Lane; PART 4 LOUISIANA MYTHOLOGIES, FROM THE KINGFISH TO THE PECULIAR FASCINATION WITH THE DEAD; The Kingfish as Trickster Hero: Huey Long in Louisiana Culture; I Want to Die in New Orleans; PART 5 MUSIC THAT SOOTHES THE SOUL

Hollers, Blue Notes, and Brass Sounds: Diverse Musical and Cultural Influences on Jazz in LouisianaOne More Last Chance: Ritual and the Jazz Funeral; CONCLUSION: Hearing Sappho in New Orleans; Contributors; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; Y; Z

In 1803, President Thomas Jefferson acquired 828,000 square miles of French territory in what became known as the Louisiana Purchase. Although today Louisiana makes up only a small portion of this immense territory, this exceptional state embraces a larger-than-life history and a cultural blend unlike any other in the nation. Louisiana Culture from the Colonial Era to Katrina, a collection of fourteen essays compiled and edited by John Lowe, captures all of the flavor and richness of the state''s heritage, illuminating how Louisiana, despite its differences from the rest of the United States, is a microcosm of key national concerns -- including regionalism, race, politics, immigration, global connections, folklore, musical traditions, ethnicity, and hybridity. Divided into five parts, the volume opens with an examination of Louisiana''s origins, with pieces on Native Americans, French and German explorers, and slavery. Two very different but complementary essays follow with investigations into the ongoing attempts to define Creoles and creolization. No collection on Louisiana would be complete without attention to its remarkable literary traditions, and several contributors offer tantalizing readings of some of the Pelican State''s most distinguished writers -- a dazzling array of artists any state would be proud to claim. The volume also includes pieces on a couple of eccentric mythologies distinct to Louisiana and explorations of Louisiana''s unique musical heritage.Throughout, the international slate of contributors explores the idea of place, particularly the concept of Louisiana as the center of the Caribbean wheel, where Cajuns, Creoles, Cubans, Haitians, Jamaicans, and others are part of a New World configuration, connected by their linguistic identity, landscape and climate, religion, and French and Spanish heritage. A poignant conclusion considers the devastating impact of Hurricanes Katrina and Rita and what the storms mean for Louisiana''s cultural future. A rich portrait of Louisiana culture, this volume stands as a reminder of why that culture must be preserved.

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