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Plural Sovereignties and Contemporary Indigenous Literature.

By: Christie, Stuart.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2009Description: 1 online resource (295 p.).ISBN: 9780230620759.Subject(s): American literature - Indian authors - History and criticism | American literature --Indian authors --History and criticism | Identity (Psychology) in literature | Identity (Psychology) in literature | Imperialism in literature | Imperialism in literature | Indians in literature | Indians in literature | Indians of North America - Intellectual life | Indians of North America --Intellectual life | Racially mixed people - Canada - Intellectual life | Racially mixed people - United States - Intellectual life | Racially mixed people --Canada --Intellectual life | Racially mixed people in literature | Racially mixed people in literature | Racially mixed people --United States --Intellectual lifeGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Plural Sovereignties and Contemporary Indigenous LiteratureDDC classification: 810.9/897 | 810.9897 LOC classification: PS153.I52C49 2009Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Figures; Cover Image; Preface and Acknowledgments; Introduction: Plural Sovereignties and Indigenous Literary Formation; Part I: Representations; One: Blood Legacies: Pathology and Power in Works by Sherman Alexie and A. A. Carr; Two: National Captivity Narratives in Welch, Silko, and Armstrong; Three: Trickster''s Gamble: Capitalizing Indigenous Discourse in Vizenor''s The Heirs of Columbus and Erdrich''s The Bingo Palace; Part II: Futures; Four: Recovering Sovereignty in Louis Owens''s Dark River
Five: Indigenous Wormholes: Reading Plural Sovereignties in Works by Thomas KingConclusion; Notes; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W
Summary: Offering close readings of novels by Sherman Alexie to Leslie Marmon Silko, this book documents the reinvention of Anglo-European nationality in the interests of sustaining the indigenous traditions that long-preceded colonization.
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PS153.I52C49 2009 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=485331 Available EBL485331

Cover; Contents; Figures; Cover Image; Preface and Acknowledgments; Introduction: Plural Sovereignties and Indigenous Literary Formation; Part I: Representations; One: Blood Legacies: Pathology and Power in Works by Sherman Alexie and A. A. Carr; Two: National Captivity Narratives in Welch, Silko, and Armstrong; Three: Trickster''s Gamble: Capitalizing Indigenous Discourse in Vizenor''s The Heirs of Columbus and Erdrich''s The Bingo Palace; Part II: Futures; Four: Recovering Sovereignty in Louis Owens''s Dark River

Five: Indigenous Wormholes: Reading Plural Sovereignties in Works by Thomas KingConclusion; Notes; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W

Offering close readings of novels by Sherman Alexie to Leslie Marmon Silko, this book documents the reinvention of Anglo-European nationality in the interests of sustaining the indigenous traditions that long-preceded colonization.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Christie (Hong Kong Baptist Univ.) offers fresh but informed theory regarding indigenous identities and applies that theory in close critical readings of selected contemporary indigenous writers such as Sherman Alexie (Indian Killer), A. A. Carr (Eye Killers), James Welch (The Heartsong of Charging Elk), Leslie Marmon Silko (Gardens in the Dunes), Jeanette Armstrong (Slash), Gerald Vizenor (The Heirs of Columbus), Louise Erdrich (The Bingo Palace), Louis Owens (Dark River), and Thomas King (Medicine River, Truth and Bright Water). Working with "resources in Indian and Native law, the sociology of indigenous communities, and cultural studies," the author exposes the relationship between the colonizing pressures of white settlers to view the Native communities as one sovereign whole and the contending pressures within Native communities to argue for the rights of plural and independent indigenous sovereignties. Christie also explores the role of the "nonsovereign academic" whose work often involves a "misappropriation of sovereign discourse." He focuses especially on language and the differences between writers who understand the Native mother tongue and "the colonizer's knowledge that is merely acquired using a second language." On the question of plural sovereignties, Christie argues for the lived experience found in Native literatures. Summing Up: Recommended. Researchers and faculty. B. M. McNeal Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania

Author notes provided by Syndetics

STUART CHRISTIE is Associate Professor of English at Hong Kong Baptist University.

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