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Oglala Women : Myth, Ritual, and Reality

By: Powers, Marla N.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Women in Culture and Society: Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2010Description: 1 online resource (275 p.).ISBN: 9780226677507.Subject(s): Indian women -- South Dakota | Indians of North America -- South Dakota -- Social life and customs | Oglala Indians -- Social life and customs | Oglala womenGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Oglala Women : Myth, Ritual, and RealityDDC classification: 305.48897 | 305.4889752 | 305.8/97 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; List of Illustrations; Series Editor''s Foreword; Preface; Introduction; The Past; The Present; Notes; References; Index
Summary: Based on interviews and life histories collected over more than twenty-five years of study on the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota, Marla N. Powers conveys what it means to be an Oglala woman. Despite the myth of the Euramerican that sees Oglala women as inferior to men, and the Lakota myth that seems them as superior, in reality, Powers argues, the roles of male and female emerge as complementary. In fact, she claims, Oglala women have been better able to adapt to the dominant white culture and provide much of the stability and continuity of modern tribal life. This rich ethnographic portrait considers the complete context of Oglala life-religion, economics, medicine, politics, old age-and is enhanced by numerous modern and historical photographs."It is a happy event when a fine scholarly work is rendered accessible to the general reader, especially so when none of the complexity of the subject matter is sacrificed. Oglala Women is a long overdue revisionary ethnography of Native American culture."-Penny Skillman, San Francisco Chronicle Review"Marla N. Powers''s fine study introduced me to Oglala women ''portrayed from the perspectives of Indians,'' to women who did not pity themselves and want no pity from others. . . . A brave, thorough, and stimulating book."-Melody Graulich, Women''s Review of Books"Powers''s new book is an intricate weaving . . . and her synthesis brings all of these pieces into a well-integrated and insightful whole, one which sheds new light on the importance of women and how they have adapted to the circumstances of the last century."-Elizabeth S. Grobsmith, Nebraska History
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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E99 | E99.O3 P67 2010 | E99.O3P67 1986 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=488105 Available EBL488105

Contents; List of Illustrations; Series Editor''s Foreword; Preface; Introduction; The Past; The Present; Notes; References; Index

Based on interviews and life histories collected over more than twenty-five years of study on the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota, Marla N. Powers conveys what it means to be an Oglala woman. Despite the myth of the Euramerican that sees Oglala women as inferior to men, and the Lakota myth that seems them as superior, in reality, Powers argues, the roles of male and female emerge as complementary. In fact, she claims, Oglala women have been better able to adapt to the dominant white culture and provide much of the stability and continuity of modern tribal life. This rich ethnographic portrait considers the complete context of Oglala life-religion, economics, medicine, politics, old age-and is enhanced by numerous modern and historical photographs."It is a happy event when a fine scholarly work is rendered accessible to the general reader, especially so when none of the complexity of the subject matter is sacrificed. Oglala Women is a long overdue revisionary ethnography of Native American culture."-Penny Skillman, San Francisco Chronicle Review"Marla N. Powers''s fine study introduced me to Oglala women ''portrayed from the perspectives of Indians,'' to women who did not pity themselves and want no pity from others. . . . A brave, thorough, and stimulating book."-Melody Graulich, Women''s Review of Books"Powers''s new book is an intricate weaving . . . and her synthesis brings all of these pieces into a well-integrated and insightful whole, one which sheds new light on the importance of women and how they have adapted to the circumstances of the last century."-Elizabeth S. Grobsmith, Nebraska History

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Intensive life history interviews with Oglala Lakota women aged 16 to 96 living on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in South Dakota show Oglala women to be not subordinate to males but complementary. Beginning with ideological and cosmological bases for Lakota male and female behavior, the author analyzes the roles of female deities as creators, teachers, and bringers of fortune. Women are, in Oglala belief if not reality, complementary in their roles with men. Traditional life is contrasted with that of the modern federalized reservation tribe. Excellent cultural history for college students. Allen C. Turner, Sociology, Anthropology & Social Work Dept., Idaho State Univ., Pocatello (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Powers (Rutgers) describes traditional and contemporary roles of Oglala women within the contexts of ``myth, ritual, and reality'' on the Pine Ridge reservation, South Dakota. With knowledge drawn from life histories and gained from more than 25 years of study, the author provides rich ethnographic and historical detail that should help correct the Euroamerican stereotype of Lakota women as drudges in a male-dominated society (compare with The Hidden Half: Studies of Plains Indian Women ed. by Patricia Albers and Beatrice Medicine, CH, Jul '83). Throughout the stages of her life cycle-both in the old buffalo culture and within the newer reservation lifeway-an Oglala woman's roles complemented and supported those of men. But it is the women who have been most successful in adapting to changing economic and social environments, while preserving their Lakota heritage. This is a fine and valuable book that provides new insights and contributes to anthropological understanding of the Oglala. Appropriate illustrations; comprehensive bibliography. There are few typographical errors. Appropriate for university collections.-D.C. Taylor, University of Montana

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Marla N. Powers is professor of anthropology at Seton Hall University. She is also a visiting research associate of the Institute for Research on Women and an associate member of the graduate faculty in anthropology at Rutgers University.

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