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The American New Woman Revisited : A Reader, 1894-1930

By: Patterson, Martha.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New Brunswick, NJ : Rutgers University Press, 2008Description: 1 online resource (358 p.).ISBN: 9780813544946.Subject(s): Feminism - United States - History | Minority women - United States - History | Women - United States - History | Women | Women''s rights - United States - HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The American New Woman Revisited : A Reader, 1894-1930DDC classification: 305.48/800973 | 305.48800973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Part 1: Defining the New Woman in the Periodical Press; "The New Aspect of the Woman Question," Sarah Grand; "The New Woman," Ouida; "The Campaign Girl," Kate Masterson; "Here Is the New Woman"; "Bloomers at the Bar"; "The New-Woman Santa Claus"; "The New Negro Woman," Mrs. Booker T. Washington; "Woman in Another New Role"; "The New Woman": An Address by Emma Goldman before the Liberal Progressive Society
"Women in the Territories: Some of Their Achievements in Fields of Energy Generally Filled By Men-Typical Examples, Including a Mining Speculator and a Cowboy""The 'New Woman' Got the Drop on Him"; "The Negro Woman-Social and Moral Decadence," Eleanor Tayleur; "Bicycle Number"; "Ise Gwine ter Give You Gals What Straddle," Edward Kemble; "St. Valentine's Number," Charles Dana Gibson; "The Flapper," H.L. Mencken; "The New Negro Woman"; "A Bit of Life," Russell; Part II: Women's Suffrage and Political Participation; "The New Woman of the New South," Josephine K. Henry
"Foibles of the New Woman," Ella W.Winston"In the Public Eye"; "Suffragette [to the Bearded Lady]: How Do You Manage It?" Augustus Smith Daggy; "Women's Rights: and the Duties of Both Men and Women," Theodore Roosevelt; "Movie of a Woman on Election Day"; "Squaws Demand 'Rights': Penobscot Indian Women Want Vote: Privilege in Tribal Elections"; "The New Woman: What She Wanted and What She Got," Frederick L. Collins; "La Mujer Nueva" [The New Woman], Clotilde Betances Jaeger; Part III: Temperance, Social Purity, and Maternalism; "At Home with the Editor," Edward Bok
"The New Woman," Rev. Ella E. Bartlett"The New Woman," Lillian W. Betts; "Miss Willard on the 'New Woman' "; "The Chinese Woman in America," Sui Seen Far [Edith Eaton]; "The New Woman," Elizabeth Cady Stanton; "The New Womanhood," Charlotte Perkins Gilman; "Alte und Neue Frauen" [Of Old and New Women], Frau Anna; Part IV: The Women's Club Movement and Women's Education; "Women's Department," Edited by Pauline E. Hopkins; "A Girl's College Life," Lavinia Hart; "The Typical Woman of the New South," Julia Magruder
"Rough Sketches: A Study of the Features of the New Negro Woman," John H. Adams Jr."The Modern Indian Girl"; "Lo! The New Indian. Mohawk Belle"; "The Sacrifice"; "Professional Training"; Part V: Work and the Labor Movement; "The New Woman"; "The New Woman and Her Ways: The Woman Farmer," Maude Radford Warren; "Debemos Trabajar" [We Must Work], Astrea; "New Jobs for New Women," Virginia Roderick; "A New Woman?" Dorothy Weil; "The Negro Woman Teacher and the Negro Student," Elise Johnson McDougald; "Pin-Money Slaves," Poppy Cannon; Part VI: World War I and Its Aftermath
Cover of Hearst's Magazine
Summary: Bringing together a diverse range of essays from the periodical press of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Martha H. Patterson shows how the New Woman differed according to region, class, politics, race, ethnicity, and historical circumstance. In addition to the New Woman's prevailing incarnations, she appears here as a gun-wielding heroine, imperialist symbol, assimilationist icon, entrepreneur, socialist, anarchist, thief, vamp, and eugenicist. Together, these readings redefine our understanding of the New Woman and her cultural impact.
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HQ1410.A44 2008 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=358313 Available EBL358313

Contents; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Part 1: Defining the New Woman in the Periodical Press; "The New Aspect of the Woman Question," Sarah Grand; "The New Woman," Ouida; "The Campaign Girl," Kate Masterson; "Here Is the New Woman"; "Bloomers at the Bar"; "The New-Woman Santa Claus"; "The New Negro Woman," Mrs. Booker T. Washington; "Woman in Another New Role"; "The New Woman": An Address by Emma Goldman before the Liberal Progressive Society

"Women in the Territories: Some of Their Achievements in Fields of Energy Generally Filled By Men-Typical Examples, Including a Mining Speculator and a Cowboy""The 'New Woman' Got the Drop on Him"; "The Negro Woman-Social and Moral Decadence," Eleanor Tayleur; "Bicycle Number"; "Ise Gwine ter Give You Gals What Straddle," Edward Kemble; "St. Valentine's Number," Charles Dana Gibson; "The Flapper," H.L. Mencken; "The New Negro Woman"; "A Bit of Life," Russell; Part II: Women's Suffrage and Political Participation; "The New Woman of the New South," Josephine K. Henry

"Foibles of the New Woman," Ella W.Winston"In the Public Eye"; "Suffragette [to the Bearded Lady]: How Do You Manage It?" Augustus Smith Daggy; "Women's Rights: and the Duties of Both Men and Women," Theodore Roosevelt; "Movie of a Woman on Election Day"; "Squaws Demand 'Rights': Penobscot Indian Women Want Vote: Privilege in Tribal Elections"; "The New Woman: What She Wanted and What She Got," Frederick L. Collins; "La Mujer Nueva" [The New Woman], Clotilde Betances Jaeger; Part III: Temperance, Social Purity, and Maternalism; "At Home with the Editor," Edward Bok

"The New Woman," Rev. Ella E. Bartlett"The New Woman," Lillian W. Betts; "Miss Willard on the 'New Woman' "; "The Chinese Woman in America," Sui Seen Far [Edith Eaton]; "The New Woman," Elizabeth Cady Stanton; "The New Womanhood," Charlotte Perkins Gilman; "Alte und Neue Frauen" [Of Old and New Women], Frau Anna; Part IV: The Women's Club Movement and Women's Education; "Women's Department," Edited by Pauline E. Hopkins; "A Girl's College Life," Lavinia Hart; "The Typical Woman of the New South," Julia Magruder

"Rough Sketches: A Study of the Features of the New Negro Woman," John H. Adams Jr."The Modern Indian Girl"; "Lo! The New Indian. Mohawk Belle"; "The Sacrifice"; "Professional Training"; Part V: Work and the Labor Movement; "The New Woman"; "The New Woman and Her Ways: The Woman Farmer," Maude Radford Warren; "Debemos Trabajar" [We Must Work], Astrea; "New Jobs for New Women," Virginia Roderick; "A New Woman?" Dorothy Weil; "The Negro Woman Teacher and the Negro Student," Elise Johnson McDougald; "Pin-Money Slaves," Poppy Cannon; Part VI: World War I and Its Aftermath

Cover of Hearst's Magazine

Bringing together a diverse range of essays from the periodical press of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, Martha H. Patterson shows how the New Woman differed according to region, class, politics, race, ethnicity, and historical circumstance. In addition to the New Woman's prevailing incarnations, she appears here as a gun-wielding heroine, imperialist symbol, assimilationist icon, entrepreneur, socialist, anarchist, thief, vamp, and eugenicist. Together, these readings redefine our understanding of the New Woman and her cultural impact.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

English professor Patterson (McKendree Univ.) aggregates 74 essays, poems, articles, editorials, and images appearing in magazines and newspapers from the late-19th century through the 1920s. Her goal is to reinterpret the "evolving, fiercely contested" character and "cultural phenomenon" known as the New Woman. In an overly succinct introductory essay, Patterson makes an interesting argument that the emergence of this icon was more multifaceted than previously understood, changing over time, and interpreted to advance different agendas according to the writer's race, ethnicity, social status, and political leanings. Documents are divided into topical sections: "Defining the New Woman in the Periodical Press," "Women's Suffrage and Political Participation," "Temperance, Social Purity, and Maternalism," "The Women's Club Movement and Women's Education," "Work and the Labor Movement," "World War I and Its Aftermath," "Prohibition and Sexuality," "Consumer Culture, Leisure Culture, and Technology," and "Evolution, Birth Control, and Eugenics." However, Patterson treats these sections unevenly and provides only a very brief commentary for each document; she often misses the opportunity to anchor them to her thesis. Nevertheless, the collection presents varied manifestations of an icon that "worked to define American identity" during a dynamic era. Summing Up: Recommended. General and undergraduate collections. C. M. Kennedy Clarion University of Pennsylvania

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Martha H. Patterson is an associate professor of English at McKendree University in Illinois and the author of Beyond the Gibson Girl: Reimagining the American New Woman, 1895-1915.

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