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Sexuality and Its Queer Discontents in Middle English Literature.

By: Pugh, Tison.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.The New Middle Ages: Publisher: New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2008Description: 1 online resource (233 p.).ISBN: 9780230610521.Subject(s): English literature - Middle English, 1100-1500 - History and criticism | English literature | Gender identity in literature | Heterosexuality in literature | Homosexuality in literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Sexuality and Its Queer Discontents in Middle English LiteratureDDC classification: 820.9/35380902 | 820.9001 LOC classification: PR275.G44P84 2008Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; 1 Introduction: Sexuality and Its Queer Discontents in Middle English Literature; 2 Abandoning Desires, Desiring Readers, and the Divinely Queer Triangle of Pearl; 3 Queering Harry Bailly: Gendered Carnival, Social Ideologies, and Masculinity under Duress in the Canterbury Tales; 4 "He nedes moot unto the pley assente": Queer Fidelities and Contractual Hermaphroditism in Chaucer's Clerk's Tale; 5 From Boys to Men to Hermaphrodites to Eunuchs: Queer Formations of Romance Masculinity and the Hagiographic Death Drive in Amis and Amiloun
6 Queer Castration, Patriarchal Privilege, and the Comic Phallus in Eger and Grime7 Conclusion: Compulsory Queerness and the Pleasures of Medievalism; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: This book exposes the ways in which ostensibly normative sexualities depend upon queerness to shore up their claims of privilege. Through readings of such classic texts as The Canterbury Tales and Eger and Grime, Tison Pugh explains how sexual normativity can often be claimed only after queerness has been rejected.
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PR275.G44P84 2008 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=370443 Available EBL370443

Cover; Contents; Acknowledgments; 1 Introduction: Sexuality and Its Queer Discontents in Middle English Literature; 2 Abandoning Desires, Desiring Readers, and the Divinely Queer Triangle of Pearl; 3 Queering Harry Bailly: Gendered Carnival, Social Ideologies, and Masculinity under Duress in the Canterbury Tales; 4 "He nedes moot unto the pley assente": Queer Fidelities and Contractual Hermaphroditism in Chaucer's Clerk's Tale; 5 From Boys to Men to Hermaphrodites to Eunuchs: Queer Formations of Romance Masculinity and the Hagiographic Death Drive in Amis and Amiloun

6 Queer Castration, Patriarchal Privilege, and the Comic Phallus in Eger and Grime7 Conclusion: Compulsory Queerness and the Pleasures of Medievalism; Notes; Bibliography; Index

This book exposes the ways in which ostensibly normative sexualities depend upon queerness to shore up their claims of privilege. Through readings of such classic texts as The Canterbury Tales and Eger and Grime, Tison Pugh explains how sexual normativity can often be claimed only after queerness has been rejected.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Whether this study of Middle English queerness is valuable depends on one's tolerance for the language of psychoanalysis, because this is an homage to Freud. Pugh (Univ. of Central Florida) channels his energy into men "who have queerness thrust upon 'em" during an age lacking a sophisticated sexual vocabulary and concepts of normative sexuality. The author begins with an investigation of the queerness exposed in the Pearl dream vision through the competition between God and the dreamer for the love of the dreamer's deceased daughter. Pugh devotes two chapters to Canterbury Tales: he ponders Harry Bailly's ability to queer the pilgrims through his own overbearing masculinity, and he looks at Griselda, the queering agent of "The Clerk's Tale," who manipulates her husband into a model of paternal masculinity. Pugh follows with analyses of homosocial brotherhood in Amis and Amiloun and Eger and Grime, in which homosocial oaths become the queering structure of the romances. Pugh ends with a look at the queerness-constructing medievalists in the academy. This is a book for specialists in medieval studies. Summing Up: Optional. Graduate students through faculty. J. Pruitt University of Wisconsin--Rock County

Author notes provided by Syndetics

TISON PUGH is Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of English, as well as a Distinguished Researcher in the College of Arts and Humanities, at the University of Central Florida, USA.

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