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A Family Venture : Men and Women on the Southern Frontier

By: Cashin, Joan E.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 1992Description: 1 online resource (217 p.).ISBN: 9781601296955.Subject(s): Frontier and pioneer life | Migration, Internal | Plantation life | Plantation life - Southern States - History - 19th century | Plantation ownersGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: A Family Venture : Men and Women on the Southern FrontierDDC classification: 975/.03 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Introduction; 1. The Ties of Nature: The Planter Family in the Seaboard; 2. In Search of Manly Independence: The Migration Decision; 3. A New World: Journey and Settlement; 4. A Little More of This World''s Goods: Family, Kinship, and Economics; 5. To Live Like Fighting Cocks: Independence, Sex Roles, and Slavery; Conclusion; A Note on the Tables; Tables; Notes; Index
Summary: This social history examines the westward migration of US farming families from the southern seaboard in the years before the American Civil War.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F213 .C34 1991eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=270854 Available EBL270854

Contents; Introduction; 1. The Ties of Nature: The Planter Family in the Seaboard; 2. In Search of Manly Independence: The Migration Decision; 3. A New World: Journey and Settlement; 4. A Little More of This World''s Goods: Family, Kinship, and Economics; 5. To Live Like Fighting Cocks: Independence, Sex Roles, and Slavery; Conclusion; A Note on the Tables; Tables; Notes; Index

This social history examines the westward migration of US farming families from the southern seaboard in the years before the American Civil War.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

A beautifully written statistical study of planter families and slaves who migrated from the southern seaboard states to the new southwest between 1810 and 1860. Cashin's analysis is based on the identifiable roles and needs of each group. She draws specific and general conclusions about how the adventure influenced those who participated. The southern tidewater family was patriarchial, elastic, and included members of a modified, extended nuclear family. Black slaves were treated paternalistically; it was not unusual for planters to think in terms of their "black and white family." In the process of moving, planter men developed a new set of values emphasizing individualism, competition, and risk-taking that included excessive drinking, gambling, dueling, and promiscuous sex with slave women. Planter women despaired the loss of seaboard family relationships that had been so crucial to them and their children. Long distances, loneliness, illness, and the lack of communication worked to weaken the kinfolk network. The new southwest broke up slave families, black kinfolk relations, and the planters' sense of "black and white" familial relations. Photos, tables, notes. For college, university, and public libraries.-J. D. Born Jr., Wichita State University

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