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A History of European Women''s Work : 1700 to the Present

By: Simonton, Deborah.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2002Edition: 1.Description: 1 online resource (343 p.).ISBN: 9780203007006.Subject(s): Home economics | Housewives | Rural women | Women | Women - Employment - Europe - History | Women domestics | Women farmersGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: A History of European Women''s Work : 1700 to the PresentDDC classification: 305.43094 | 331.4/094 LOC classification: HD6134.S54 1998ebOnline resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Front Cover; A History of European Women's Work; Copyright Page; Contents; Illustrations; Acknowledgements; 1. Introduction; Part I: The eighteenth century, c. 1700-90; 2. Women, household and farm; The idea of woman in society and economy; Domestic responsibilities; Household, life cycle and female upbringing; Women as farm workers; Gender and the tasks of the field; 3. Making, selling, serving; The verlagsystem and proto-industry; Women and rural industry; Women in towns: the guild model; Apprenticeship; Urban women and family working; Masterless women: life cycle and independence
Woman as worker4. Location, skill and status; Domesticity, time and place; Gender and skill; Part II: The nineteenth century, c. 1790-1880; 5. Domesticity, the invention of housework, and domestic service; Domesticity; Housework; Context and chronology of domestic service; Who were the domestic servants?; The experience of domestic service; Living-out servants; 6. Rural women-farmhouse and agriculture; Periods and trends; Field work and its organization; Dairying; Fishing; Women's skills and gender differences; 7. Industry, commerce and public service; Women and industrial change
Technology, skill and genderHandicrafts, homeworking and sweating; Businesswomen and public service; 8. Continuity and change: gender, skill and status; Woman as worker; Domestic roles, family issues and women's work; The family wage; Gender, skill and craft traditions; Part III: The twentieth century, c. 1880-1980; 9. Home and work; The shape of work; The meaning of the wars; Domesticity and beyond: redefining women, wives and mothers; Life cycle: 'birds of passage'; Housework; Domestic service; 10. Continuities in country and town; Agriculture and rural women; Homework and sweated trades
Manufacturing and 'new industries'11. New work: white blouses in the tertiary sector; The tertiary sector and 'white blouse' work; Change in the tertiary sector; Women as workers; The work experience; Skill, status and segregation; 12. Conclusion: gender, skill and status; Gendering the workplace; gendering the worker; Gendering skill; Gendering technology; Gendering control; The woman worker; the working woman; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: First Published in 1998. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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HD6134.S54 1998eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=169515 Available EBL169515

Front Cover; A History of European Women's Work; Copyright Page; Contents; Illustrations; Acknowledgements; 1. Introduction; Part I: The eighteenth century, c. 1700-90; 2. Women, household and farm; The idea of woman in society and economy; Domestic responsibilities; Household, life cycle and female upbringing; Women as farm workers; Gender and the tasks of the field; 3. Making, selling, serving; The verlagsystem and proto-industry; Women and rural industry; Women in towns: the guild model; Apprenticeship; Urban women and family working; Masterless women: life cycle and independence

Woman as worker4. Location, skill and status; Domesticity, time and place; Gender and skill; Part II: The nineteenth century, c. 1790-1880; 5. Domesticity, the invention of housework, and domestic service; Domesticity; Housework; Context and chronology of domestic service; Who were the domestic servants?; The experience of domestic service; Living-out servants; 6. Rural women-farmhouse and agriculture; Periods and trends; Field work and its organization; Dairying; Fishing; Women's skills and gender differences; 7. Industry, commerce and public service; Women and industrial change

Technology, skill and genderHandicrafts, homeworking and sweating; Businesswomen and public service; 8. Continuity and change: gender, skill and status; Woman as worker; Domestic roles, family issues and women's work; The family wage; Gender, skill and craft traditions; Part III: The twentieth century, c. 1880-1980; 9. Home and work; The shape of work; The meaning of the wars; Domesticity and beyond: redefining women, wives and mothers; Life cycle: 'birds of passage'; Housework; Domestic service; 10. Continuities in country and town; Agriculture and rural women; Homework and sweated trades

Manufacturing and 'new industries'11. New work: white blouses in the tertiary sector; The tertiary sector and 'white blouse' work; Change in the tertiary sector; Women as workers; The work experience; Skill, status and segregation; 12. Conclusion: gender, skill and status; Gendering the workplace; gendering the worker; Gendering skill; Gendering technology; Gendering control; The woman worker; the working woman; Notes; Bibliography; Index

First Published in 1998. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Simonton has put together a useful general history aimed primarily at the college classroom. Starting with the premise that women have always worked, she traces a path from 18th-century preindustrial agricultural workers through the transformations of industrial capitalism, the early factories, the urban servants, the glorification of domesticity, and finally to the entry of women into white collar, professional, and service employment in the 20th century. Several themes unify the analysis: although women have always worked, often at backbreaking labor, their work has been separated by gender, influenced by the persistent ideology that sees women as fragile, better at work connected to the domestic sphere, good at repetitive labor, and unable to master high-status skills. Indeed, a second theme revolves around the definition of skill. Women have traditionally been denied entrance into the skilled work granted to men, and even when trained, their work has been defined as unskilled, needing male supervision. The argument about the persistence of domestic ideology is well made, but it might have been even stronger if more attention had been paid to the work/family nexus and how male-dominated institutions such as banks, education, and most critically, state governments, maintained and reinforced the male dominance of the workplace. All levels. J. Wishnia; SUNY at Stony Brook

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