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Women Workers And Technological Change In Europe In The Nineteenth And twentieth century.

By: De Groot, Gertjan.
Contributor(s): Schrover, Marlou.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2005Description: 1 online resource (225 p.).ISBN: 9780203991084.Subject(s): Employees | Sexual division of labor | Women | Women--Employment--Europe--HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Women Workers And Technological Change In Europe In The Nineteenth And twentieth centuryDDC classification: 305.43 | 331.4/094 LOC classification: HD6134.W65HD6134.W654 1995ebOnline resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Front Cover; Women Workers and Technological Change in Europe in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries; Copyright Page; Contents; Chapter 1. General Introduction: Gertjan de Groot Marlou Schrover; Chapter 2. Frames of Reference: Skill, Gender and New Technology in the Hosiery Industry: Harriet Bradley; Chapter 3. The Creation of a Gendered Division of Labour in the Danish Textile Industry: Marianne Rostgård; Chapter 4. Foreign Technology and the Gender Division of Labour in a Dutch Cotton Spinning Mill: Gertjan de Groot
Chapter 5. ''The Mysteries of the Typewriter'': Technology and Gender in the British Civil Service, 1870-1914: Meta ZimmeckChapter 6. 'A Revolution in the Workplace'? Women's Work in Munitions Factories and Technological Change 1914-1918: Deborah Thom; Chapter 7. Gender and Technological Change in the North Staffordshire Pottery Industry: Jacqueline Sarsby; Chapter 8. Periodization and the Engendering of Technology: ThePottery of Gustavsberg, Sweden, 1880-1980: Ulla Wikander; Chapter 9. Creating Gender: Technology and Femininity in the Swedish Dairy Industry: Lena Sommestad
Chapter 10. Cooking up Women's Work: Women Workers in the Dutch Food Industries 1889-1960: Marlou SchroverNotes on Contributors; Index
Summary: Traces the origins of the segregation between women''s and men''s work in the 19th and 20th century. It rejects the idea that women were mainly employed as unskilled labour, asserting that women''s skills were required but that historical records and social definitions of "skill" have denied this.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HD6134.W65 | HD6134.W654 1995eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=238692 Available EBL238692

Front Cover; Women Workers and Technological Change in Europe in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries; Copyright Page; Contents; Chapter 1. General Introduction: Gertjan de Groot Marlou Schrover; Chapter 2. Frames of Reference: Skill, Gender and New Technology in the Hosiery Industry: Harriet Bradley; Chapter 3. The Creation of a Gendered Division of Labour in the Danish Textile Industry: Marianne Rostgård; Chapter 4. Foreign Technology and the Gender Division of Labour in a Dutch Cotton Spinning Mill: Gertjan de Groot

Chapter 5. ''The Mysteries of the Typewriter'': Technology and Gender in the British Civil Service, 1870-1914: Meta ZimmeckChapter 6. 'A Revolution in the Workplace'? Women's Work in Munitions Factories and Technological Change 1914-1918: Deborah Thom; Chapter 7. Gender and Technological Change in the North Staffordshire Pottery Industry: Jacqueline Sarsby; Chapter 8. Periodization and the Engendering of Technology: ThePottery of Gustavsberg, Sweden, 1880-1980: Ulla Wikander; Chapter 9. Creating Gender: Technology and Femininity in the Swedish Dairy Industry: Lena Sommestad

Chapter 10. Cooking up Women's Work: Women Workers in the Dutch Food Industries 1889-1960: Marlou SchroverNotes on Contributors; Index

Traces the origins of the segregation between women''s and men''s work in the 19th and 20th century. It rejects the idea that women were mainly employed as unskilled labour, asserting that women''s skills were required but that historical records and social definitions of "skill" have denied this.

Description based upon print version of record.

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