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Decolonial Voices : Chicana and Chicano Cultural Studies in the 21st Century

By: Aldama, Arturo J.
Contributor(s): Quiñonez, Naomi.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Bloomington, IN : Indiana University Press, 2002Description: 1 online resource (428 p.).ISBN: 9780253108814.Subject(s): American literature | Decolonization | Mexican American arts | Mexican Americans | Mexican Americans - Intellectual life | PostcolonialismGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Decolonial Voices : Chicana and Chicano Cultural Studies in the 21st CenturyDDC classification: 305.86872073 LOC classification: E184.M5 D34 2002ebOnline resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; Foreword; Acknowledgments; Introduction: ¡Peligro! Subversive Subjects: Chicana and Chicano Cultural Studies in the 21st Century; 1. Millennial Anxieties: Borders,Violence,and the Struggle for Chicana and Chicano Subjectivity; 2. Writing on the Social Body: Dresses and Body Ornamentation in Contemporary Chicana Art; 3. New Iconographies: Film Culture in Chicano Cultural Production; 4. Penalizing Chicano/A Bodies in Edward J.Olmos''s American Me; 5. Biopower, Reproduction, and the Migrant Woman''s Body; 6. Anzaldúa''s Frontera: Inscribing Gynetics
7. Re(Riting) the Chicana Postcolonial: From Traitor to 21st Century Interpreter8. How the Border Lies: Some Historical Reflections; 9. See How I Am ReceivedŽ: Nationalism, Race, and Gender in Who Would Have Thought It?; 10. Engendering Re/Solutions: The (Feminist) Legacy of Estela Portillo Trambley; 11. Unir los Lazos: Braiding Chicana and Mexicana Subjectivities; 12. Borders, Feminism, and Spirituality: Movements in Chicana Aesthetic Revisioning; 13. Border/Transformative Pedagogies at the End of the Millennium: Chicana/o Cultural Studies and Education; 14. On the Bad Edge of La Frontera
15. Here Is Something You Can''t Understand ...Ž: Chicano Rap and the Critique of Globalization16. A Sifting of Centuries: Afro-Chicano Interaction and Popular Musical Culture in California, 1960 …2000; 17. Narratives of Undocumented Mexican Immigration as Chicana/o Acts of Intellectual and Political Responsibility; 18. Teki Lenguas del Yollotzín (Cut Tongues from the Heart): Colonialism, Borders, and the Politics of Space; 19. The Alamo, Slavery, and the Politics of Memory; 20. Color Coded: Reflections at the Millennium; Contributors; Index
Summary: The interdisciplinary essays in Decolonial Voices discuss racialized, subaltern, feminist, and diasporic identities and the aesthetic politics of hybrid and mestiza/o cultural productions. This collection represents several key directions in the field: First, it charts how subaltern cultural productions of the US/ Mexico borderlands speak to the intersections of "local," "hemispheric," and "globalized" power relations of the border imaginary. Second, it recovers the Mexican women''s and Chicana literary and cultural heritages that have been ignored by Euro-American canons and patriarchal exclusionary practices. It also expands the field in postnationalist directions by creating an interethnic, comparative, and transnational dialogue between Chicana and Chicano, African American, Mexican feminist, and U.S. Native American cultural vocabularies. Contributors include Norma Alarcón, Arturo J. Aldama, Frederick Luis Aldama, Cordelia Chávez Candelaria, Alejandra Elenes, Ramón Garcia, María Herrera-Sobek, Patricia Penn Hilden, Gaye T. M. Johnson, Alberto Ledesma, Pancho McFarland, Amelia María de la Luz Montes, Laura Elisa Pérez, Naomi Quiñonez, Sarah Ramirez, Rolando J. Romero, Delberto Dario Ruiz, Vicki Ruiz, José David Saldívar, Anna Sandoval, and Jonathan Xavier Inda.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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E184.M5 D34 2002eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=129788 Available EBL129788
Browsing UT Tyler Online Shelves , Shelving location: Online Close shelf browser
E184.M5 C383 2007 Amá, your story is mine : E184.M5 C438 2017 Sounds of crossing : E184.M5 C446 2014 The Chicano Movement : E184.M5 D34 2002eb Decolonial Voices : E184.M5 F65 2014 Mexicans in the making of America / E184.M5 .G344 2014 Making Aztlán : E184.M5 G3746 2016 Literature as history :

Contents; Foreword; Acknowledgments; Introduction: ¡Peligro! Subversive Subjects: Chicana and Chicano Cultural Studies in the 21st Century; 1. Millennial Anxieties: Borders,Violence,and the Struggle for Chicana and Chicano Subjectivity; 2. Writing on the Social Body: Dresses and Body Ornamentation in Contemporary Chicana Art; 3. New Iconographies: Film Culture in Chicano Cultural Production; 4. Penalizing Chicano/A Bodies in Edward J.Olmos''s American Me; 5. Biopower, Reproduction, and the Migrant Woman''s Body; 6. Anzaldúa''s Frontera: Inscribing Gynetics

7. Re(Riting) the Chicana Postcolonial: From Traitor to 21st Century Interpreter8. How the Border Lies: Some Historical Reflections; 9. See How I Am ReceivedŽ: Nationalism, Race, and Gender in Who Would Have Thought It?; 10. Engendering Re/Solutions: The (Feminist) Legacy of Estela Portillo Trambley; 11. Unir los Lazos: Braiding Chicana and Mexicana Subjectivities; 12. Borders, Feminism, and Spirituality: Movements in Chicana Aesthetic Revisioning; 13. Border/Transformative Pedagogies at the End of the Millennium: Chicana/o Cultural Studies and Education; 14. On the Bad Edge of La Frontera

15. Here Is Something You Can''t Understand ...Ž: Chicano Rap and the Critique of Globalization16. A Sifting of Centuries: Afro-Chicano Interaction and Popular Musical Culture in California, 1960 …2000; 17. Narratives of Undocumented Mexican Immigration as Chicana/o Acts of Intellectual and Political Responsibility; 18. Teki Lenguas del Yollotzín (Cut Tongues from the Heart): Colonialism, Borders, and the Politics of Space; 19. The Alamo, Slavery, and the Politics of Memory; 20. Color Coded: Reflections at the Millennium; Contributors; Index

The interdisciplinary essays in Decolonial Voices discuss racialized, subaltern, feminist, and diasporic identities and the aesthetic politics of hybrid and mestiza/o cultural productions. This collection represents several key directions in the field: First, it charts how subaltern cultural productions of the US/ Mexico borderlands speak to the intersections of "local," "hemispheric," and "globalized" power relations of the border imaginary. Second, it recovers the Mexican women''s and Chicana literary and cultural heritages that have been ignored by Euro-American canons and patriarchal exclusionary practices. It also expands the field in postnationalist directions by creating an interethnic, comparative, and transnational dialogue between Chicana and Chicano, African American, Mexican feminist, and U.S. Native American cultural vocabularies. Contributors include Norma Alarcón, Arturo J. Aldama, Frederick Luis Aldama, Cordelia Chávez Candelaria, Alejandra Elenes, Ramón Garcia, María Herrera-Sobek, Patricia Penn Hilden, Gaye T. M. Johnson, Alberto Ledesma, Pancho McFarland, Amelia María de la Luz Montes, Laura Elisa Pérez, Naomi Quiñonez, Sarah Ramirez, Rolando J. Romero, Delberto Dario Ruiz, Vicki Ruiz, José David Saldívar, Anna Sandoval, and Jonathan Xavier Inda.

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Aldama (Arizona State Univ.) and Qui^D nones (California State Univ., Fullerton) have assembled a remarkable range of essays on topics ranging from dresses and body art, film, popular music (including Chicano rap), and literary works to race, nationalism, and gender. The situation of undocumented workers gets full attention. The collection is especially strong on Chicana issues, redressing the male-centered atmosphere of the early Chicano movement. The level of the writing is high, though a few of the essays are sodden with jargon. The editors provide no overall bibliography, but most of the essays have lengthy bibliographies of their own. The index is unusually detailed, which is very helpful with a wide-ranging collection like this one. The use of illustrations where needed, as in the treatment of film and body art, is a bonus. This essential work cuts across disciplinary boundaries and illuminates many aspects of contemporary Chicana/o life. The work closest to it in spirit is Criticism in the Borderlands, ed. by Hector Calderon and Jose David Saldivar (CH, Jun'92), though Decolonial Voices gives more attention to popular culture. All collections. B. Almon University of Alberta

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Arturo J. Aldama is Associate Professor in the Department of Chicana/o Studies at Arizona State University. He is the author of Disrupting Savagism:Intersecting Chicana/o, Mexicana/o and Native American Struggles for Representation and several articles on Chicana/o and Native American cultural, literary and filmic studies. He is also Director elect for the Chicana and Chicano literary studies executive committee of the Modern Language Association.</p> <p>Naomi Quiñonez is Assistant Professor in the Department of Chicana/o Studies at Cal State Fullerton. She is a widely anthologized poet and the author of Hummingbird Dreams/ Sueño de Colibri; The Smoking Mirror (1998); the editor of Invocation L.A.: Urban Multicultural Poetry. Her scholarly work appears in several anthologies and special issues of top refereed journals.</p>

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