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Knowledgeable Women : Structuralism and the Reproduction of Elites

By: Delamont, Sara.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2002Edition: 1.Description: 1 online resource (337 p.).ISBN: 9780203207499.Subject(s): Educational sociology | Elite (Social sciences) | Structuralism | WomenGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Knowledgeable Women : Structuralism and the Reproduction of ElitesDDC classification: 306.43 | 370.19 | 370.19345 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; KNOWLEDGEABLE WOMEN: Structuralism and the Reproduction of Elites; Copyright; Contents; Preface and acknowledgements; Part I Introductory themes; 1 Introduction: towards a structuralist sociology of education; 2 Cultural capital and muted groups: the theoretical perspective of the volume; 3 Lessons from St Luke's: women and cultural reproduction; Part II: The mountains of inertia and prejudice: A structuralist discussion of the period 1845-1944; 4 Chaperons, gloves, and cycling in skirts: strategies against pollution in women's education; 5 Classics, chemistry, and cultural capital
6 Domesticity or Delilahism? The debates over womanliness and educationPart III Exploring structuralist sociology of education: A critique of sociological accounts for the period 1945-88; 7 A country fit for heroines? Schooling and teaching 1945-88; 8 Excluded from the elite? Women and top jobs 1945-85; 9 Mobile or nubile? Social stratification, mobility, marriage, and education; 10 Professions and powerlessness: the inadequacy of the sociology and the chauvinism of the professionals; Part IV Conclusions; 11 The old middle class strikes back
Appendix 1: The impact of feminism in the sociology of educationAppendix 2: A note on the history of education; Appendix 3: Direct-grant and independent schools aided by the IFASES 1955-63; Bibliography; Author Index; Subject Index
Summary: In this book, the author traces the history of education and the elites it produces. It is a structuralist and feminist challenge to the sociology of education and presents non-sexist, structuralist and fully sociological ideas.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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LC191.D445 | LC191.D445 1989eb (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=168752 Available EBL168752

Cover; KNOWLEDGEABLE WOMEN: Structuralism and the Reproduction of Elites; Copyright; Contents; Preface and acknowledgements; Part I Introductory themes; 1 Introduction: towards a structuralist sociology of education; 2 Cultural capital and muted groups: the theoretical perspective of the volume; 3 Lessons from St Luke's: women and cultural reproduction; Part II: The mountains of inertia and prejudice: A structuralist discussion of the period 1845-1944; 4 Chaperons, gloves, and cycling in skirts: strategies against pollution in women's education; 5 Classics, chemistry, and cultural capital

6 Domesticity or Delilahism? The debates over womanliness and educationPart III Exploring structuralist sociology of education: A critique of sociological accounts for the period 1945-88; 7 A country fit for heroines? Schooling and teaching 1945-88; 8 Excluded from the elite? Women and top jobs 1945-85; 9 Mobile or nubile? Social stratification, mobility, marriage, and education; 10 Professions and powerlessness: the inadequacy of the sociology and the chauvinism of the professionals; Part IV Conclusions; 11 The old middle class strikes back

Appendix 1: The impact of feminism in the sociology of educationAppendix 2: A note on the history of education; Appendix 3: Direct-grant and independent schools aided by the IFASES 1955-63; Bibliography; Author Index; Subject Index

In this book, the author traces the history of education and the elites it produces. It is a structuralist and feminist challenge to the sociology of education and presents non-sexist, structuralist and fully sociological ideas.

Description based upon print version of record.

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CHOICE Review

Delamont, researchng the theories of the sociology of education in the US and the UK since 1950, finds that educational sociologists, for the most part, have not come to grips with the structural bases of class and gender in relation to the education of women. Using a "group and grid" theory developed by Mary Douglas, the author reports on her study of an elite girls' school in Scotland to show how subculture membership (group) and the control (grid) exercised by the group affect the educational careers of women, and therefore their subsequent social roles. Caught in a structural bind of male "norming," educational feminists have used various strategies to marshal the acceptance of women into the educational main stream. The message is that the educational impact of class and gender, which varies among social strata, has not been sufficiently studied at all levels. Delamont suggests that although middle-class women are making progress in the development of that "cultural capital" which has traditionally supported the elite in their educational advancement, the present situation in Britain seems designed to "limit the power, and ignore the expertise of the new middle class and especially the liberal profession." Although commercial and entrepreneurial careers are attracting the best male graduates, these careers are not yet deemed appropriate for women who, therefore, take professional studies but, because they remain in the lower rungs of the professions, fail to gain power or influence. For graduate students and faculty.-B. B. Cassara, University of the District of Columbia

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