Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Processes of Community Change and Social Action.

By: Omoto, Allen M.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Claremont Symposium on Applied Social Psychology Series: Publisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2014Description: 1 online resource (385 p.).ISBN: 9781410612984.Subject(s): Civil society | Political socialization | Social action | VoluntarismGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Processes of Community Change and Social ActionDDC classification: 302.14 | 302/.14 | 303.4 LOC classification: HN49.V64C58 2005ebOnline resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright Page; Table of Contents; Preface; Understanding Social Change: Introduction to the Volume; 1. Some Things Social Surveys Don't Tell Us About Volunteering; 2. Feeling Good by Doing Good: Health Consequences of Social Service; 3. Public Health, Race, and the AIDS Movement: The Profile and Consequences of Latino Gay Men's Community Involvement; 4. Becoming (and Remaining) a Community Volunteer: Does Personality Matter?; 5. Psychological Sense of Community: Conceptual Issues and Connections to Volunteerism-Related Activism
6. A Benefit-and-Cost Approach to Understanding Social Participation and Volunteerism in Multilevel Organizations7. Social Capital in Democratic Transition: Civil Society in South Africa; 8. Social Participation and Social Trust in Adolescence: The Importance of Heterogeneous Encounters; 9. Designing Interventions to Promote Civic Engagement; About the Contributors; Name Index; Subject Index
Summary: This volume--an outgrowth of the annual meeting of the Claremont Symposium on Applied Social Psychology--focuses on examples of social change and community action, and the processes at work in creating change. The presenters engaged each other and the audience in thinking about how best to create and sustain social change. This volume represents a product of their cumulative insight, research results, and perspectives, including chapters from each of the symposium presenters, as well as a few selected chapters from other noted scholars. Taken as a whole, the volume is highly accessible and pre
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HN49.V64C58 2005 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=237102 Available EBL237102

Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright Page; Table of Contents; Preface; Understanding Social Change: Introduction to the Volume; 1. Some Things Social Surveys Don't Tell Us About Volunteering; 2. Feeling Good by Doing Good: Health Consequences of Social Service; 3. Public Health, Race, and the AIDS Movement: The Profile and Consequences of Latino Gay Men's Community Involvement; 4. Becoming (and Remaining) a Community Volunteer: Does Personality Matter?; 5. Psychological Sense of Community: Conceptual Issues and Connections to Volunteerism-Related Activism

6. A Benefit-and-Cost Approach to Understanding Social Participation and Volunteerism in Multilevel Organizations7. Social Capital in Democratic Transition: Civil Society in South Africa; 8. Social Participation and Social Trust in Adolescence: The Importance of Heterogeneous Encounters; 9. Designing Interventions to Promote Civic Engagement; About the Contributors; Name Index; Subject Index

This volume--an outgrowth of the annual meeting of the Claremont Symposium on Applied Social Psychology--focuses on examples of social change and community action, and the processes at work in creating change. The presenters engaged each other and the audience in thinking about how best to create and sustain social change. This volume represents a product of their cumulative insight, research results, and perspectives, including chapters from each of the symposium presenters, as well as a few selected chapters from other noted scholars. Taken as a whole, the volume is highly accessible and pre

Description based upon print version of record.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.