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Multicultural Issues in Literacy Research and Practice.

By: Willis, Arlette Ingram.
Contributor(s): Garcia, Georgia Earnest | Barrera, Rosalinda B | Harris, Violet J.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Hoboken : Taylor and Francis, 2014Description: 1 online resource (553 p.).ISBN: 9781410606945.Subject(s): Literacy | Multicultural education | Social aspectsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Multicultural Issues in Literacy Research and PracticeDDC classification: 370.117 LOC classification: LC151Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright Page; Table of Contents; Preface; Introduction: Giving Voice to Multicultural Literacy Research and Practice; 1. Finding Esmerelda's Shoes: A Case Study of a Young Bilingual Child's Responses to Literature; Methods; Context of the Study; Materials and Procedures; Analysis; Results; High Structure: Limited Importations; Intertextual Links; Meaningful Prose: High Importations; Responses Across the Text; Conclusion; Reader-Shaped Responses; Language-Driven Responses; All Narratives Are Not the Same; Importance to Educators; References; Works Cited
2. Examining Children's Biliteracy in the ClassroomSignificance of Biliteracy; Theoretical Framework; Methods; The Teacher; The Students; Daniel: A Bilingual Second Grader Becoming Biliterate; The Teacher's Mediational Role; Daniel's View of His Literacy Abilities; Reading in English; Daniel's Writing Development in Two Languages; Closing Remarks; References; 3. Headwoman's Blues: Small Group Reading and the Interactions of Culture, Gender, and Ability; Themes in the Literature on Grouping and Literacy; Theoretical Framework; The Blues Idiom and the Crossroads
Break, Improvisation, and AffirmationMethod; The Setting; Framework for Data Collection and Analysis; The Headwoman and Cultural Weaving; Unit Instruction; "Crossing" and the Interaction of Multiple Variables; Headwoman's Blues; Headwoman: An Introduction; Mei: Improvising into a Headwoman; Affirmation and New Understanding; Discussion; Conclusion; References; 4. Fostering Collaboration Between Home and School Through Curriculum Development: Perspectives of Three Appalachian Children; Theoretical Framework; Method; Research Context; Methodological Stance; Data Collection and Analysis
InterpretationsNatalie; Jeremy; Christy; Discussion; Children as Avid Collectors of Cultural Treasures; Family Members as Knowledgeable Elders; Curriculum as a Cross-Spatial Experience; Curriculum as a Temporal Link to the Past; Curriculum as Generator of Ancestral Pride; Curriculum as Sustaining an Optimistic, If Guarded, Sense of the Future; Conclusion; References; 5. Telling the People's Stories: Literacy Practices and Processes in a Navajo Community School; Multiculturalism in a Diné Context; The Social History of Literacy Learning at Rough Rock
Reenvisioning Children's Literacy PotentialsCurriculum Development as a Social Transaction; The Literacy Continuum; What Difference does this Make?; References; 6. Multicultural Views of Literacy Learning and Teaching; Method; Results; Parents' Perceptions of Literacy Learning Interview Schedule; Open-Ended Question; Method; Upton Elementary School; Oakville School; Bottomland School; Conclusion; Postscript; References; 7. Spanish in Latino Picture Storybooks in English: Its Use and Textual Effects; Theoretical Framework; The Nature of Literary Bilingualism; The Author As Cultural Translator
Method
Summary: This volume brings together researchers and participants from diverse groups, reflecting the different ways in which the field of multicultural literacies has been interpreted. A common theme across the chapters is attention to the ways in which elements of difference--race, ethnicity, gender, class, and language--create dynamic tensions that influence students'' literacy experiences and achievement. The hope of the editors is that readers will build on the experiences and findings presented so that the field of multicultural literacies will have a greater impact of literacy research, policy,
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
LC151 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=356321 Available EBL356321

Cover; Half Title; Title Page; Copyright Page; Table of Contents; Preface; Introduction: Giving Voice to Multicultural Literacy Research and Practice; 1. Finding Esmerelda's Shoes: A Case Study of a Young Bilingual Child's Responses to Literature; Methods; Context of the Study; Materials and Procedures; Analysis; Results; High Structure: Limited Importations; Intertextual Links; Meaningful Prose: High Importations; Responses Across the Text; Conclusion; Reader-Shaped Responses; Language-Driven Responses; All Narratives Are Not the Same; Importance to Educators; References; Works Cited

2. Examining Children's Biliteracy in the ClassroomSignificance of Biliteracy; Theoretical Framework; Methods; The Teacher; The Students; Daniel: A Bilingual Second Grader Becoming Biliterate; The Teacher's Mediational Role; Daniel's View of His Literacy Abilities; Reading in English; Daniel's Writing Development in Two Languages; Closing Remarks; References; 3. Headwoman's Blues: Small Group Reading and the Interactions of Culture, Gender, and Ability; Themes in the Literature on Grouping and Literacy; Theoretical Framework; The Blues Idiom and the Crossroads

Break, Improvisation, and AffirmationMethod; The Setting; Framework for Data Collection and Analysis; The Headwoman and Cultural Weaving; Unit Instruction; "Crossing" and the Interaction of Multiple Variables; Headwoman's Blues; Headwoman: An Introduction; Mei: Improvising into a Headwoman; Affirmation and New Understanding; Discussion; Conclusion; References; 4. Fostering Collaboration Between Home and School Through Curriculum Development: Perspectives of Three Appalachian Children; Theoretical Framework; Method; Research Context; Methodological Stance; Data Collection and Analysis

InterpretationsNatalie; Jeremy; Christy; Discussion; Children as Avid Collectors of Cultural Treasures; Family Members as Knowledgeable Elders; Curriculum as a Cross-Spatial Experience; Curriculum as a Temporal Link to the Past; Curriculum as Generator of Ancestral Pride; Curriculum as Sustaining an Optimistic, If Guarded, Sense of the Future; Conclusion; References; 5. Telling the People's Stories: Literacy Practices and Processes in a Navajo Community School; Multiculturalism in a Diné Context; The Social History of Literacy Learning at Rough Rock

Reenvisioning Children's Literacy PotentialsCurriculum Development as a Social Transaction; The Literacy Continuum; What Difference does this Make?; References; 6. Multicultural Views of Literacy Learning and Teaching; Method; Results; Parents' Perceptions of Literacy Learning Interview Schedule; Open-Ended Question; Method; Upton Elementary School; Oakville School; Bottomland School; Conclusion; Postscript; References; 7. Spanish in Latino Picture Storybooks in English: Its Use and Textual Effects; Theoretical Framework; The Nature of Literary Bilingualism; The Author As Cultural Translator

Method

This volume brings together researchers and participants from diverse groups, reflecting the different ways in which the field of multicultural literacies has been interpreted. A common theme across the chapters is attention to the ways in which elements of difference--race, ethnicity, gender, class, and language--create dynamic tensions that influence students'' literacy experiences and achievement. The hope of the editors is that readers will build on the experiences and findings presented so that the field of multicultural literacies will have a greater impact of literacy research, policy,

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Willis examines "multicultural issues in literacy research and practice." The volume consists of 12 research studies of literacy and biliteracy for "at-risk" students, including studies of Appalachian, Navajo, African American, and Latino children. Each study reviews pertinent research, presents the methods and findings of a study, and discusses its implications. Different cultural attitudes and approaches toward literacy are examined. In the first case study, Eurydice Bauer concludes that "realistic fiction that is personally relevant may be particularly desirable to foster meaningful engagement with books." In their essay, Gunderson and Anderson point out that "in many countries, books are the absolute source of knowledge, wisdom, and truth," and Rueda and Garcia note the pervasiveness of "recitation teaching" for "at-risk students" that is "highly routinized and/or scripted" and unresponsive to the needs of these students. Overall the papers emphasize the importance of teachers reflecting individually and collectively with regard to their practices and responsiveness to the specific needs of their students. ^BSumming Up: Recommended. Graduate students and researchers and faculty. J. A. Reyhner Northern Arizona University

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