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The Age of Garvey : How a Jamaican Activist Created a Mass Movement and Changed Global Black Politics

By: Ewing, Adam.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.America in the World: Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (319 p.).ISBN: 9781400852444.Subject(s): African diaspora | Garvey, Marcus, 1887-1940 -- Influence | Garvey, Marcus, 1887-1940 | HISTORY / Africa / General | HISTORY / Caribbean & West Indies / General | HISTORY / United States / 20th Century | POLITICAL SCIENCE / Colonialism & Post-Colonialism | POLITICAL SCIENCE / General | SOCIAL SCIENCE / Ethnic Studies / African American Studies | Universal Negro Improvement Association -- HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Age of Garvey : How a Jamaican Activist Created a Mass Movement and Changed Global Black PoliticsDDC classification: 305.896 | 305.896/073 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title; Copyright; Dedication; CONTENTS; Acknowledgments; INTRODUCTION; Part One: The Rise and Fall of Marcus Garvey; CHAPTER ONE: The Education of Marcus Mosiah Garvey; CHAPTER TWO: The Center Cannot Hold; CHAPTER THREE: Africa for the Africans!; CHAPTER FOUR: "The Silent Work That Must Be Done"; Part Two: The Age of Garvey; CHAPTER FIVE: The Tide of Preparation; CHAPTER SIX: Broadcast on the Winds; CHAPTER SEVEN: The Visible Horizon; CHAPTER EIGHT: Muigwithania (The Reconciler); AFTERWORD; Abbreviations; Notes; Index
Summary: Jamaican activist Marcus Garvey (1887-1940) organized the Universal Negro Improvement Association in Harlem in 1917. By the early 1920s, his program of African liberation and racial uplift had attracted millions of supporters, both in the United States and abroad. The Age of Garvey presents an expansive global history of the movement that came to be known as Garveyism. Offering a groundbreaking new interpretation of global black politics between the First and Second World Wars, Adam Ewing charts Garveyism's emergence, its remarkable global transmission, and its influence in the responses amon
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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E185.97.G3 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1689366 Available EBL1689366
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E185.97.D73 W167 2014 W.E.B. Du Bois on Race and Culture. E185.97.F39 K54 2015 She can bring us home : E185.97.F717 W563 2002 A gentleman of color : E185.97.G3 The Age of Garvey : E185.97.G3 The age of Garvey : E185.97.G3 -- .E95 2014 The Age of Garvey : E185.97.G3 -- .H37 2007 The Rise and Fall of the Garvey Movement in the Urban South, 1918–1942.

Cover; Title; Copyright; Dedication; CONTENTS; Acknowledgments; INTRODUCTION; Part One: The Rise and Fall of Marcus Garvey; CHAPTER ONE: The Education of Marcus Mosiah Garvey; CHAPTER TWO: The Center Cannot Hold; CHAPTER THREE: Africa for the Africans!; CHAPTER FOUR: "The Silent Work That Must Be Done"; Part Two: The Age of Garvey; CHAPTER FIVE: The Tide of Preparation; CHAPTER SIX: Broadcast on the Winds; CHAPTER SEVEN: The Visible Horizon; CHAPTER EIGHT: Muigwithania (The Reconciler); AFTERWORD; Abbreviations; Notes; Index

Jamaican activist Marcus Garvey (1887-1940) organized the Universal Negro Improvement Association in Harlem in 1917. By the early 1920s, his program of African liberation and racial uplift had attracted millions of supporters, both in the United States and abroad. The Age of Garvey presents an expansive global history of the movement that came to be known as Garveyism. Offering a groundbreaking new interpretation of global black politics between the First and Second World Wars, Adam Ewing charts Garveyism's emergence, its remarkable global transmission, and its influence in the responses amon

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Adam Ewing is assistant professor of African American studies at Virginia Commonwealth University.

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