Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Behold the Black Caiman : A Chronicle of Ayoreo Life

By: Bessire, Lucas.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (325 p.).ISBN: 9780226175607.Subject(s): Moro Indians -- Economic conditions | Moro Indians -- Economic policy | Moro Indians -- Social conditionsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Behold the Black Caiman : A Chronicle of Ayoreo LifeDDC classification: 989.2004/98 | 989.200498 LOC classification: F2679F2679.2.M6 .B488 2014Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Contents; List of Illustrations; Prefatory Note; Introduction: A New World; Chapter 1. The Devil and the Fetishization of Tradition; Chapter 2. The Lost Center of the World; Chapter 3. Hunting Indians; Chapter 4. Mediating the New Human; Chapter 5. Apocalypse and the Limits of Transformation; Chapter 6. Shame and the Limits of the Subject; Chapter 7. Affliction and the Limits of Becoming; Chapter 8. The Politics of Isolation; Conclusion: Behold the Black Caiman; Acknowledgments; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: In 2004, one of the world's last bands of voluntarily isolated nomads left behind their ancestral life in the dwindling thorn forests of northern Paraguay, fleeing ranchers' bulldozers.  Behold the Black Caiman is Lucas Bessire's intimate chronicle of the journey of this small group of Ayoreo people, the terrifying new world they now face, and the precarious lives they are piecing together against the backdrop of soul-collecting missionaries, humanitarian NGOs, late liberal economic policies, and the highest deforestation rate in the world. Drawing on ten years of fieldwork, Bessire highlights
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
F2679 | F2679.2.M6 .B488 2014 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=1778801 Available EBL1778801
Browsing UT Tyler Online Shelves , Shelving location: Online Close shelf browser
F2659.N4 A368 2011 Terms of inclusion : F2659.N4 C685 2006 The Unified Black Movement in Brazil, 1978-2002. F2659.N4 D336 2014 Reimagining Black Difference and Politics in Brazil : F2679 | F2679.2.M6 .B488 2014 Behold the Black Caiman : F2687 .G9225 2012 La guerra del Paraguay : F2723 | F2723 .V4713 2001 | F2723.V4713 2001 Forgotten Conquests : F2728 .B67 2015 Tupamaros :

Contents; List of Illustrations; Prefatory Note; Introduction: A New World; Chapter 1. The Devil and the Fetishization of Tradition; Chapter 2. The Lost Center of the World; Chapter 3. Hunting Indians; Chapter 4. Mediating the New Human; Chapter 5. Apocalypse and the Limits of Transformation; Chapter 6. Shame and the Limits of the Subject; Chapter 7. Affliction and the Limits of Becoming; Chapter 8. The Politics of Isolation; Conclusion: Behold the Black Caiman; Acknowledgments; Notes; Bibliography; Index

In 2004, one of the world's last bands of voluntarily isolated nomads left behind their ancestral life in the dwindling thorn forests of northern Paraguay, fleeing ranchers' bulldozers.  Behold the Black Caiman is Lucas Bessire's intimate chronicle of the journey of this small group of Ayoreo people, the terrifying new world they now face, and the precarious lives they are piecing together against the backdrop of soul-collecting missionaries, humanitarian NGOs, late liberal economic policies, and the highest deforestation rate in the world. Drawing on ten years of fieldwork, Bessire highlights

Description based upon print version of record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Anthropologist Bessire (Oklahoma) has struggled valiantly to integrate historical records, his own close and sustained ethnographic experience, and recent (even journalistic) accounts to provide a relatively coherent picture of the experience of various groups among the Ayoreo (often glossed as "Moro") people, who have been widely characterized as "the last population to remain uncontacted" by Western civilization. His introduction to the Chaco (southern Bolivia and Paraguay) integrates ecological, sociological, folkloric, and other perspectives, and he goes far beyond description in attempting to interpret meanings and feelings in relation to a number of different theories. In his view, anthropologists are mistaken to believe that cross-cultural understanding is possible and governments to believe that a pluricultural system can actually operate. For the same reasons, Bessire contends, nongovernmental organizations rarely serve the people to whom they are assigned, and missionaries are guilty of ethnocide, not because they deliberately kill people but because "born-again Christians" are torn from their moral and intellectual as well as their historical roots. Superabundant academic jargon makes this a difficult book to read, but it provides valuable insights into major issues of ethnic identity and cultural change as well as a little-known population. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students/faculty. --Dwight B. Heath, Brown University

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.