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Ambition in America : political power and the collapse of citizenship / Jeffrey A. Becker.

By: Becker, Jeffrey A, 1968-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Lexington, Kentucky : University Press of Kentucky, 2014Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780813145068; 0813145066.Subject(s): Political participation -- Social aspects -- United States | Ambition -- Political aspects -- United States | Representative government and representation -- United States | Power (Social sciences) -- United States | Citizenship -- United States | Political culture -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Ambition in AmericaDDC classification: 306.20973 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Preface: the triumph of ambition and the collapse of citizenship? -- Introduction : the paradox of power in America -- The ambition of moral citizens : belonging and the limits of the moral community -- The ambition of interests : American constitutionalism -- The ambition of popular control : Jacksonian democracy and American populism -- The ambition to recover democratic excellence : Tocqueville and Franklin Delano Roosevelt -- To flatter and obey : the triumph of ambition -- Keeping ambition accountable : a place for political parties -- Conclusion : the collapse of modern citizenship.
Summary: Most Americans admire the determination and drive of artists, athletes, and CEOs, but they seem to despise similar ambition in their elected officials. The structure of political representation and the separation of powers detailed in the United States Constitution were intended to restrain self-interested ambition. Because not all citizens have a desire to rule, republican democracies must choose leaders from pools of ambitious candidates while trying to prevent those same people from exploiting public power to dominate the less ambitious. Ambition in America: Political Power and the Collapse.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
JK1764 .B398 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt6wrrxv Available ocn877868065

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Print version record.

Preface: the triumph of ambition and the collapse of citizenship? -- Introduction : the paradox of power in America -- The ambition of moral citizens : belonging and the limits of the moral community -- The ambition of interests : American constitutionalism -- The ambition of popular control : Jacksonian democracy and American populism -- The ambition to recover democratic excellence : Tocqueville and Franklin Delano Roosevelt -- To flatter and obey : the triumph of ambition -- Keeping ambition accountable : a place for political parties -- Conclusion : the collapse of modern citizenship.

Most Americans admire the determination and drive of artists, athletes, and CEOs, but they seem to despise similar ambition in their elected officials. The structure of political representation and the separation of powers detailed in the United States Constitution were intended to restrain self-interested ambition. Because not all citizens have a desire to rule, republican democracies must choose leaders from pools of ambitious candidates while trying to prevent those same people from exploiting public power to dominate the less ambitious. Ambition in America: Political Power and the Collapse.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Jeffrey Becke r is associate professor of political science at the University of the Pacific. He lives in Stockton, California.</p>

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