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So much to lose : John F. Kennedy and American policy in Laos / William J. Rust.

By: Rust, William J.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Studies in conflict, diplomacy, and peace: Publisher: Lexington : The University Press of Kentucky, 2014Description: 1 online resource (377 p.).ISBN: 9780813144788; 0813144787; 9780813144771; 0813144779.Subject(s): United States -- Foreign relations -- Laos | Laos -- Foreign relations -- United States | United States -- Foreign relations -- 1961-1963 | Kennedy, John F. (John Fitzgerald), 1917-1963Additional physical formats: Print version:: So Much to Lose : John F. Kennedy and American Policy in LaosDDC classification: 327.730594090 | 327.730594090/46 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Front cover; Copyright; Contents; Maps; Abbreviations; Introduction; 1. We Cannot Enforce What We Would Like; 2. A Wide Measure of Discretion; 3. Less Precise Language Than We Desire; 4. A Disagreeable, Hard, and Dangerous Fact; 5. A Severe Loss of Face; 6. A Very Hazardous Course; 7. A Colossal Booby Trap; 8. We Do Not Havethe Power of Decision; Photo Illustrations; 9. Tenuous at Best; 10. A Piece of War; 11. We're Going to Have to Take Some Action; Epilogue; Acknowledgments; Appendix 1; Appendix 2; Appendix 3; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: Before U.S. combat units were deployed to Vietnam, presidents Eisenhower and Kennedy strove to defeat a communist-led insurgency in Laos. This impoverished, landlocked Southeast Asian kingdom was geopolitically significant because it bordered more powerful communist and anticommunist nations. The Ho Chi Minh Trail, which traversed the country, was also a critical route for North Vietnamese infiltration into South Vietnam.In So Much to Lose: John F. Kennedy and American Policy in Laos, William J. Rust continues his definitive examination of U.S.-Lao relations during the Cold War, prov.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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E183.8.L3 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt6wrrpg Available ocn875820692

Description based upon print version of record.

Front cover; Copyright; Contents; Maps; Abbreviations; Introduction; 1. We Cannot Enforce What We Would Like; 2. A Wide Measure of Discretion; 3. Less Precise Language Than We Desire; 4. A Disagreeable, Hard, and Dangerous Fact; 5. A Severe Loss of Face; 6. A Very Hazardous Course; 7. A Colossal Booby Trap; 8. We Do Not Havethe Power of Decision; Photo Illustrations; 9. Tenuous at Best; 10. A Piece of War; 11. We're Going to Have to Take Some Action; Epilogue; Acknowledgments; Appendix 1; Appendix 2; Appendix 3; Notes; Bibliography; Index

Before U.S. combat units were deployed to Vietnam, presidents Eisenhower and Kennedy strove to defeat a communist-led insurgency in Laos. This impoverished, landlocked Southeast Asian kingdom was geopolitically significant because it bordered more powerful communist and anticommunist nations. The Ho Chi Minh Trail, which traversed the country, was also a critical route for North Vietnamese infiltration into South Vietnam.In So Much to Lose: John F. Kennedy and American Policy in Laos, William J. Rust continues his definitive examination of U.S.-Lao relations during the Cold War, prov.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Former journalist, now professional historian, researcher, and writer Rust's sequel to Before the Quagmire: American Intervention in Laos, 1954-1961 (CH, Nov'12, 50-1679) is another excellent book that propels him into the first rank of scholars of the sparsely covered Laos theater in the Southeast Asian conflict. Drawing on meticulous archival research, the author details the diplomatic, intelligence, and military activities that led to the 1962 Geneva Accords, the breakdown of the agreement, and the implications for the wars in Vietnam and Laos. Making sense of the complex flow of players, events, and negotiations in Laos is challenging, and the subject can be a bit overwhelming for more casual readers, but Rust handles the task deftly. Equally good is the treatment of the policy debates within the Kennedy administration. Ultimately, Kennedy's policy in Laos failed; this had a major impact on the war that Lyndon Johnson inherited and expanded. This fine study, an important addition to the superb "Studies in Conflict, Diplomacy, and Peace" series, in conjunction with the Rust's earlier volume, establishes him alongside Timothy Castle and Arthur Dommen as one of the best students of the war in Laos. --Joe P. Dunn, Converse College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> William J. Rust , a former journalist and communications consultant, is the author of Kennedy in Vietnam: American Vietnam Policy, 1960--1963 and Before the Quagmire: American Intervention in Laos, 1954--1961 .</p>

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