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The war that never ends : new perspectives on the Vietnam War / edited by David L. Anderson and John Ernst.

Contributor(s): Anderson, David L | Ernst, John.
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Lexington : The University Press of Kentucky, 2014Description: 1 online resource (378 p.).ISBN: 9780813145617; 0813145619.Subject(s): Vietnam War, 1961-1975 | Vietnam War, 1961-1975 -- United States | United States -- History -- 1945- | Vietnam -- History -- 1945-1975Additional physical formats: Print version:: The War That Never Ends : New Perspectives on the Vietnam WarDDC classification: 959.704/3 LOC classification: DS557.7 | .A675 2014Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. Summary: More than three decades after the final withdrawal of American troops from Southeast Asia, the legacy of the Vietnam War continues to influence political, military, and cultural discourse. Journalists, politicians, scholars, pundits, and others have used the conflict to analyze each of America's subsequent military engagements. Many Americans have observed that Vietnam-era terms such as ""cut and run,"" ""quagmire,"" and ""hearts and minds"" are ubiquitous once again as comparisons between U.S. involvement in Iraq and in Vietnam seem increasingly appropriate.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
DS557.7 .A675 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt6wrrsx Available ocn875097128

Description based upon print version of record.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

More than three decades after the final withdrawal of American troops from Southeast Asia, the legacy of the Vietnam War continues to influence political, military, and cultural discourse. Journalists, politicians, scholars, pundits, and others have used the conflict to analyze each of America's subsequent military engagements. Many Americans have observed that Vietnam-era terms such as ""cut and run,"" ""quagmire,"" and ""hearts and minds"" are ubiquitous once again as comparisons between U.S. involvement in Iraq and in Vietnam seem increasingly appropriate.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This important collection of essays deals with opposition during the war in Vietnam, ranging from Buddhist resistance to the Diem regime, to dissent within the US military to US involvement in an Asian war, to the antiwar movement in the US and mounting criticism of the war in the Senate. There are also notable chapters on the life of the combat infantryman; whether Ho was a Confucian or a Marxist; the Vietnamese women of the revolution; LBJ's search for allies in the war; an analysis of Diem's rule; an evaluation of the relationship between the media and the war in Southeast Asia; and an assessment of US policy by a North Vietnamese scholar. The work ends with George Herring (to whom the essays are dedicated) trying to answer why this war "never seems to go away." The Vietnam War challenged both the belief in "American exceptionalism" and the concept of "American invincibility." Throughout the book, there are numerous references to and comparisons with the present war in Iraq. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. W. T. Lindley Union University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> David L. Anderson is professor of history in the Division of Social, Behavioral, and Global Studies at California State University, Monterey Bay, and past president of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations. His publications include The Vietnam War and Shadow on the White House .</p> <p> John Ernst is professor of history at Morehead State University and the author of Forging a Fateful Alliance .</p>

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