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Pastoral Elegy in Contemporary British and Irish Poetry.

By: Twiddy, Iain.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Continuum Literary Studies: Publisher: London : Bloomsbury Publishing, 2012Description: 1 online resource (305 p.).ISBN: 9781441126979.Subject(s): Elegiac poetry, English -- History and criticism | English poetry -- Irish authors -- History and criticism | Pastoral poetry, English -- History and criticismGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Pastoral Elegy in Contemporary British and Irish PoetryDDC classification: 821.9109 | 821/.9109 LOC classification: PR8781.P37 T95 2012Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Title; Copy right; Contents; Acknowledgements; Introduction: Contemporary Pastoral Elegy; Pastoral Elegy Today; The Endangered Elegy; Why Pastoral Elegy?; What Happens in a Pastoral Elegy?; Social Pastoral Elegy; Notes; 1 Inheritance and Commemoration: Memorial Landscapes in Michael Longley's Poetry; 'Betweenness' and the Nature of Memory; Pastoral Elegy and War; The Consoling Image; Pastoral Elegy and Communal Remembrance; Closed and Open Form; Notes; 2 Community Poetry 1: Pastoral Elegy in Ted Hughes's Remains of Elmet, Moortown Diary and River
Communal Forms: Eclogue, Pastoral Elegy and Reverse Pastoral ElegyRemains of Elmet; The Farmer Poet: Animal Elegy in Moortown Diary; Pastoral and Conservation: River; Notes; 3 Community Poetry 2: Pastoral Elegy in Ted Hughes's Birthday Letters; Exorcism and the Use of Communal Myth; Fate Narratives and Exoneration; Violation and Peace; Notes; 4 Leaving Home: Seamus Heaney's Parental Elegies; Maternal Pietas in 'Clearances'; From Actual to Virtual Landscapes; Paternal Elegy: Making Contact with the Father; Notes; 5 Pastoral and Aftermath: Seamus Heaney
Pastoral and Aftermath: The Virgilian ModelPastoral Elegy and Restoration; Pastoral Elegy and Artistic Responsibility; Notes; 6 'Routine Periodic Faunal Extinctions': Peter Reading's Ecological Elegies1; Ecological Elegy and Intimacy; Anti-Pastoral Elegy in C.; Environmental Degeneration; Economics and Ecology in Perduta Gente; Elegy and Ecological Ethics in Faunal; Notes; 7 Contemporary Female Poets and Pastoral Elegy; Male and Female Mourning; Women and Irish National Elegy: Boland and Ní Dhomhnaill; Varieties of Female Pastoral Elegy: Meehan and Shuttle; Notes
8 Grief Brought to Numbers: Paul Muldoon's Circular ElegiesRhyme and Shape: Elegy and Cancerous Form; Pastoral Landscape and Oedipal Navigation: 'Yarrow'; Alternative Lives: Self-Elegy; Anti-Elegy: 'The Stoic'; Notes; 9 The Ethics of Pastoral Elegy: Douglas Dunn and Christopher Reid; The Ethics of Mourning in Elegies; The Loss of the Pastoral State in Elegies; Consolation and the Verdict of Reality; Pastoral Necessity in A Scattering; The Flowering of Grief; Notes; Conclusion: The Future of Pastoral Elegy; Notes; Bibliography; Index
Summary: Defying critical suggestions that the pastoral elegy is obsolete, Iain Twiddy reveals the popularity of the form in the work of major contemporary poets Seamus Heaney, Ted Hughes and Paul Muldoon, Michael Longley, Douglas Dunn and Peter Reading. As Twiddy outlines the development of the form, he identifies its characteristics and functions. But more importantly his study accounts for the enduring appeal of the pastoral elegy, why poets look to its conventions during times of personal distress and social disharmony, and how it allows them to recover from grief, loss and destruction. Informed by
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PR8781.P37 T95 2012 (Browse shelf) http://uttyler.eblib.com/patron/FullRecord.aspx?p=894568 Available EBL894568

Title; Copy right; Contents; Acknowledgements; Introduction: Contemporary Pastoral Elegy; Pastoral Elegy Today; The Endangered Elegy; Why Pastoral Elegy?; What Happens in a Pastoral Elegy?; Social Pastoral Elegy; Notes; 1 Inheritance and Commemoration: Memorial Landscapes in Michael Longley's Poetry; 'Betweenness' and the Nature of Memory; Pastoral Elegy and War; The Consoling Image; Pastoral Elegy and Communal Remembrance; Closed and Open Form; Notes; 2 Community Poetry 1: Pastoral Elegy in Ted Hughes's Remains of Elmet, Moortown Diary and River

Communal Forms: Eclogue, Pastoral Elegy and Reverse Pastoral ElegyRemains of Elmet; The Farmer Poet: Animal Elegy in Moortown Diary; Pastoral and Conservation: River; Notes; 3 Community Poetry 2: Pastoral Elegy in Ted Hughes's Birthday Letters; Exorcism and the Use of Communal Myth; Fate Narratives and Exoneration; Violation and Peace; Notes; 4 Leaving Home: Seamus Heaney's Parental Elegies; Maternal Pietas in 'Clearances'; From Actual to Virtual Landscapes; Paternal Elegy: Making Contact with the Father; Notes; 5 Pastoral and Aftermath: Seamus Heaney

Pastoral and Aftermath: The Virgilian ModelPastoral Elegy and Restoration; Pastoral Elegy and Artistic Responsibility; Notes; 6 'Routine Periodic Faunal Extinctions': Peter Reading's Ecological Elegies1; Ecological Elegy and Intimacy; Anti-Pastoral Elegy in C.; Environmental Degeneration; Economics and Ecology in Perduta Gente; Elegy and Ecological Ethics in Faunal; Notes; 7 Contemporary Female Poets and Pastoral Elegy; Male and Female Mourning; Women and Irish National Elegy: Boland and Ní Dhomhnaill; Varieties of Female Pastoral Elegy: Meehan and Shuttle; Notes

8 Grief Brought to Numbers: Paul Muldoon's Circular ElegiesRhyme and Shape: Elegy and Cancerous Form; Pastoral Landscape and Oedipal Navigation: 'Yarrow'; Alternative Lives: Self-Elegy; Anti-Elegy: 'The Stoic'; Notes; 9 The Ethics of Pastoral Elegy: Douglas Dunn and Christopher Reid; The Ethics of Mourning in Elegies; The Loss of the Pastoral State in Elegies; Consolation and the Verdict of Reality; Pastoral Necessity in A Scattering; The Flowering of Grief; Notes; Conclusion: The Future of Pastoral Elegy; Notes; Bibliography; Index

Defying critical suggestions that the pastoral elegy is obsolete, Iain Twiddy reveals the popularity of the form in the work of major contemporary poets Seamus Heaney, Ted Hughes and Paul Muldoon, Michael Longley, Douglas Dunn and Peter Reading. As Twiddy outlines the development of the form, he identifies its characteristics and functions. But more importantly his study accounts for the enduring appeal of the pastoral elegy, why poets look to its conventions during times of personal distress and social disharmony, and how it allows them to recover from grief, loss and destruction. Informed by

Description based upon print version of record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Iain Twiddy is Associate Professor of English in the Faculty of Media and Communication at Hokkaido University, Japan.

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